Hypermobility exercise??

I have hyper mobility in all my joints. I had a physical therapist for my back. She told me absolutely no yoga. I also can't see chiropractors. Any idea on safe workouts??

Replies

  • DearestWinter
    DearestWinter Posts: 595 Member
    I have hypermobility too. If your PT has gotten you to the point where you're aware of your hypermobility and when your range of motion should stop even if your ligaments don't then Pilates is great. Just shop around for a studio where they really know what they're doing. (I've done Pilates classes at gyms and that is so wildly different than what I find in a Pilates studio.)

    I'm taking private lessons. I find it's really similar to PT only more hands on and very slowly incremental. It's been very helpful for me.

    And yes, no yoga. I wasn't even aware of all of the awful stuff I was doing in yoga until I starting Pilates. "Touch my toes? Absolutely! That's so easy! Why are you saying I should feel a stretch on my hamstrings?"
  • gypsyrose85
    gypsyrose85 Posts: 206 Member
    I have hypermobility too. If your PT has gotten you to the point where you're aware of your hypermobility and when your range of motion should stop even if your ligaments don't then Pilates is great. Just shop around for a studio where they really know what they're doing. (I've done Pilates classes at gyms and that is so wildly different than what I find in a Pilates studio.)

    I'm taking private lessons. I find it's really similar to PT only more hands on and very slowly incremental. It's been very helpful for me.

    And yes, no yoga. I wasn't even aware of all of the awful stuff I was doing in yoga until I starting Pilates. "Touch my toes? Absolutely! That's so easy! Why are you saying I should feel a stretch on my hamstrings?"

    Lol I know. I don't even stretch often and can lay my palms on the ground. If I ever did do stretch I would end up being a contortionist.
  • gypsyrose85
    gypsyrose85 Posts: 206 Member
    I have hypermobility too. If your PT has gotten you to the point where you're aware of your hypermobility and when your range of motion should stop even if your ligaments don't then Pilates is great. Just shop around for a studio where they really know what they're doing. (I've done Pilates classes at gyms and that is so wildly different than what I find in a Pilates studio.)

    I'm taking private lessons. I find it's really similar to PT only more hands on and very slowly incremental. It's been very helpful for me.

    And yes, no yoga. I wasn't even aware of all of the awful stuff I was doing in yoga until I starting Pilates. "Touch my toes? Absolutely! That's so easy! Why are you saying I should feel a stretch on my hamstrings?"

    Lol I know. I don't even stretch often and can lay my palms on the ground. If I ever did do stretch I would end up being a contortionist.

  • laurenpjokl
    laurenpjokl Posts: 118 Member
    Which joints are hypermobile? I have hypermobility in my shoulders, hips, and hands. I do various exercises as my physiotherapist taught me.

    I tried pilates workouts at home when I first started, but I was so weak I just got frustrated. I should really try that again. :-/

    I've found the best way to go with new strength exercises is to start with very minimal weight and to do the movement mindfully. Concentrate on using the correct muscle, no partial dislocations, no hyperextension, no "crunching". Then put the weight up slowly over time.

    Stick with low weight, high reps.

    My PT taught me that core strength is really important. Bridges and planking are good for this.
  • laurenpjokl
    laurenpjokl Posts: 118 Member
    Haha, when my GP said I had hypermobility syndrome, I thought, "Hypermobility? You've got to be kidding, I've never been able to touch my toes."

    My PT explained my hamstrings were too tight because I grew up with HM in my knees and hips, just like my traps were really tense from keeping my shoulders from falling out of their sockets.
  • danzrlove
    danzrlove Posts: 445 Member
    edited June 2016
    Hi guys I was diagnosed last week and would love some ideas. My areas are hips,knees, ankles, ribs, spine, elbow, wrists. Well I guess everything :'(@gypsyrose85
  • firef1y72
    firef1y72 Posts: 1,579 Member
    I've found weight training has been the best exercise for me. It's strengthened the muscles around the joints, reducing injuries and pain. Of course you need to know you're own limits, but my physio is really pleased with the improvements in stability.
  • danzrlove
    danzrlove Posts: 445 Member
    firef1y72 wrote: »
    I've found weight training has been the best exercise for me. It's strengthened the muscles around the joints, reducing injuries and pain. Of course you need to know you're own limits, but my physio is really pleased with the improvements in stability.

    The doctor I saw laughed at the idea of chiro and physical therapy saying I would be going for life. He said I could just do the exercises at home, but I only have a few from my chiropractor.
  • jbee27
    jbee27 Posts: 356 Member
    I've found the best way to go with new strength exercises is to start with very minimal weight and to do the movement mindfully. Concentrate on using the correct muscle, no partial dislocations, no hyperextension, no "crunching".

    Agree with the above. Even when doing planks, I have to be really aware, and make sure I'm not hyperextending my elbows.