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New public health campaign against sugar.

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  • ReaderGirl3ReaderGirl3 Member Posts: 868 Member Member Posts: 868 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    This sounds like you're saying it is inevitable...

    In some sense. I have the propensity for it. If I maintain my lifestyle and exercise level, I should hold it off. But the reality is that when I'm 80 I likely won't keep up the lifestyle and exercise regimen I do now. So, at some point I will develop diabetes. However, as diabetes is a long-term illness, it will not likely kill me before I die of something else first.

    As mentioned earlier, genetics plays a big factor in diabetes development and progression. Eating poorly and not exercising does not *cause* diabetes, at least not in the sense. But if you are genetically predisposed, and then eat poorly and don't exercise, you will develop it.

    I wonder about the whole genetics component. I realize genetics is a legitimate issue for many people (my husband deals with this and his cholesterol), but in my own experience I was told by my (former) doctor that I was genetically predisposed for type 2 diabetes. On my mother's side my great-grandfather, both grandparents and several uncles have type 2 diabetes. And back in 2012 I had a glucose number in the prediabetes range. The thing is-every single one of us were also overweight/obese. I'm the only one who actually lost the extra weight and since 2013 I've had consistent fasting glucose numbers in the 80s. So, am I actually genetically predisposed, or do my family members suffer from diabetes because of their weight? Are there cases where genetics are blamed, when it's actually a weight issue?

    Genuinely curious about this/thinking out loud here :)
    edited May 2016
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    I think being overweight is more likely to lead to T2D if you have the genetic disposition (in which case not being overweight and being active are strongly protective).

    Various members of my family have been overweight/obese, but none have had T2D. I was obese and not even insulin resistant (although to be fair I was not obese that long, and was active during part of the time I was obese, so who knows what might have happened).
  • ReaderGirl3ReaderGirl3 Member Posts: 868 Member Member Posts: 868 Member

    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    I think being overweight is more likely to lead to T2D if you have the genetic disposition (in which case not being overweight and being active are strongly protective).

    Various members of my family have been overweight/obese, but none have had T2D. I was obese and not even insulin resistant (although to be fair I was not obese that long, and was active during part of the time I was obese, so who knows what might have happened).

    Thanks, that does make sense :)
  • GamlielaGamliela Member Posts: 2,487 Member Member Posts: 2,487 Member
    I got fat from eating good fat. Homemade nut butters, olive oil, avocadoes.
    So I hope my pancreas is a happier for dat fat, no processed sugar thing.
    But still I have to do cico to get the fat I gained gone whether it was fats induced or sugar induced. :/
  • rhtexasgalrhtexasgal Member Posts: 548 Member Member Posts: 548 Member
    Breaking the soda habit was hard for me but it has now been about 4 years? I had an immediate weight loss of about 5 pounds over the course of two months just from kicking the habit. Now soda just tastes gross.

    As for this sugar campaign, I think it is a good idea. I think most parents have the best of intentions but allow "life" to interfere too much, making the lazier, easier choices. Having reminders helps a lot! I got lucky with both of my boys. One boy hates overly sweet drinks which includes soda. He will drink juice watered down - basically a shot glass of juice into a large glass of ice water - and he will drink raw cow and goats milk on occasion. My oldest son would drink soda and juice all day and all night long if we let him. I am afraid once he is out on his own, he will go hog wild for a while! However, right now, soda is perhaps a once or twice a month thing.

    My whole family sort of went along for my weight loss ride, learning to love large salads (with homemade healthier dressings), more fruit and less packaged foods. They know the whole CICO and will often question whether that large slush is worth an hours worth of running around or less food later on ... I tell my boys that they don't have to follow what I do necessarily but they do only more food. After all, they are still growing at 14 and 17 ...
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    Related to the topic of this thread (public campaigns against soda and sugary drinks), here's an article about Philadelphia's proposed soda tax: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/08/473548273/philly-wants-to-tax-soda-to-raise-money-for-schools

    And here's an argument and debate (in the comments) re the proposal. (It's a left-leaning blog, but politics aside I think the underlying issue is worth discussion: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2016/05/tax-the-rich-not-unhealthy-products.)
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Member Posts: 16,055 Member Member Posts: 16,055 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    This sounds like you're saying it is inevitable...

    In some sense. I have the propensity for it. If I maintain my lifestyle and exercise level, I should hold it off. But the reality is that when I'm 80 I likely won't keep up the lifestyle and exercise regimen I do now. So, at some point I will develop diabetes. However, as diabetes is a long-term illness, it will not likely kill me before I die of something else first.

    As mentioned earlier, genetics plays a big factor in diabetes development and progression. Eating poorly and not exercising does not *cause* diabetes, at least not in the sense. But if you are genetically predisposed, and then eat poorly and don't exercise, you will develop it.

    SO does excess sugar consumption contribute to diabetes or not? My neighbours 14yr old son drinks soda every day, eats sweets all day and adds tbs of sugar to his already sugary cereal. His doctor has warned that he WILL get diabetes if he continues like this.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,582 Member Member Posts: 2,582 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    This sounds like you're saying it is inevitable...

    In some sense. I have the propensity for it. If I maintain my lifestyle and exercise level, I should hold it off. But the reality is that when I'm 80 I likely won't keep up the lifestyle and exercise regimen I do now. So, at some point I will develop diabetes. However, as diabetes is a long-term illness, it will not likely kill me before I die of something else first.

    As mentioned earlier, genetics plays a big factor in diabetes development and progression. Eating poorly and not exercising does not *cause* diabetes, at least not in the sense. But if you are genetically predisposed, and then eat poorly and don't exercise, you will develop it.

    I wonder about the whole genetics component. I realize genetics is a legitimate issue for many people (my husband deals with this and his cholesterol), but in my own experience I was told by my (former) doctor that I was genetically predisposed for type 2 diabetes. On my mother's side my great-grandfather, both grandparents and several uncles have type 2 diabetes. And back in 2012 I had a glucose number in the prediabetes range. The thing is-every single one of us were also overweight/obese. I'm the only one who actually lost the extra weight and since 2013 I've had consistent fasting glucose numbers in the 80s. So, am I actually genetically predisposed, or do my family members suffer from diabetes because of their weight? Are there cases where genetics are blamed, when it's actually a weight issue?

    Genuinely curious about this/thinking out loud here :)
    I think that it depends on how strong the genetic defect in glucose metabolism is. No one in my immediate family has T2D, but pre-diabetes exists. My long-term blood sugar control (according to A1C and not fasting numbers) is higher than it should be, even though I'm not sedentary and have no excess body fat. So I have to be careful with what I eat, even though I'm not close to having too much body fat.

  • adremarkadremark Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member
    I wonder about the whole genetics component. I realize genetics is a legitimate issue for many people (my husband deals with this and his cholesterol), but in my own experience I was told by my (former) doctor that I was genetically predisposed for type 2 diabetes. On my mother's side my great-grandfather, both grandparents and several uncles have type 2 diabetes. And back in 2012 I had a glucose number in the prediabetes range. The thing is-every single one of us were also overweight/obese. I'm the only one who actually lost the extra weight and since 2013 I've had consistent fasting glucose numbers in the 80s. So, am I actually genetically predisposed, or do my family members suffer from diabetes because of their weight? Are there cases where genetics are blamed, when it's actually a weight issue?

    Genuinely curious about this/thinking out loud here :)

    The two issues are related. You can be obese and not have diabetes. You can be just mildly overweight and have diabetes. The issue that is confusing is that not everyone reacts the same way. And this is due to your particular genetic makeup, as well as the lifestyle you choose. So for cause and effect, *if* you are born a certain way (which you and I are), then the effect of being obese and sedentary will have a deleterious effect on you. Your family members have a genetic component, and their being overweight along with their genetics leads to diabetes. You and I have taken matters into our hands, have decided to fight what God has given us. By doing so, we are able to not develop diabetes at this point.
  • ReaderGirl3ReaderGirl3 Member Posts: 868 Member Member Posts: 868 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    I wonder about the whole genetics component. I realize genetics is a legitimate issue for many people (my husband deals with this and his cholesterol), but in my own experience I was told by my (former) doctor that I was genetically predisposed for type 2 diabetes. On my mother's side my great-grandfather, both grandparents and several uncles have type 2 diabetes. And back in 2012 I had a glucose number in the prediabetes range. The thing is-every single one of us were also overweight/obese. I'm the only one who actually lost the extra weight and since 2013 I've had consistent fasting glucose numbers in the 80s. So, am I actually genetically predisposed, or do my family members suffer from diabetes because of their weight? Are there cases where genetics are blamed, when it's actually a weight issue?

    Genuinely curious about this/thinking out loud here :)

    The two issues are related. You can be obese and not have diabetes. You can be just mildly overweight and have diabetes. The issue that is confusing is that not everyone reacts the same way. And this is due to your particular genetic makeup, as well as the lifestyle you choose. So for cause and effect, *if* you are born a certain way (which you and I are), then the effect of being obese and sedentary will have a deleterious effect on you. Your family members have a genetic component, and their being overweight along with their genetics leads to diabetes. You and I have taken matters into our hands, have decided to fight what God has given us. By doing so, we are able to not develop diabetes at this point.

    Thanks!
  • adremarkadremark Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member

    SO does excess sugar consumption contribute to diabetes or not? My neighbours 14yr old son drinks soda every day, eats sweets all day and adds tbs of sugar to his already sugary cereal. His doctor has warned that he WILL get diabetes if he continues like this.

    There are certainly people who can eat like that their whole lives and not develop diabetes. He won't know until he's in his 20s or 30s. Then, if genetically predisposed, he will develop diabetes. But honestly, why take that chance? He should just reduce the excess sugar, as it certainly is not needed nutritionally.
  • Christine_72Christine_72 Member Posts: 16,055 Member Member Posts: 16,055 Member
    adremark wrote: »

    SO does excess sugar consumption contribute to diabetes or not? My neighbours 14yr old son drinks soda every day, eats sweets all day and adds tbs of sugar to his already sugary cereal. His doctor has warned that he WILL get diabetes if he continues like this.

    There are certainly people who can eat like that their whole lives and not develop diabetes. He won't know until he's in his 20s or 30s. Then, if genetically predisposed, he will develop diabetes. But honestly, why take that chance? He should just reduce the excess sugar, as it certainly is not needed nutritionally.

    I agree, it makes my stomach turn seeing what this kid eats. He would truly have a mammoth breakdown if his mum stopped buying this stuff. He's an amped up hyper little monster. I feel bad saying that, but I avoid being around him, it's a draining experience, to say the least..
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Member Posts: 4,859 Member Member Posts: 4,859 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Related to the topic of this thread (public campaigns against soda and sugary drinks), here's an article about Philadelphia's proposed soda tax: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/08/473548273/philly-wants-to-tax-soda-to-raise-money-for-schools

    And here's an argument and debate (in the comments) re the proposal. (It's a left-leaning blog, but politics aside I think the underlying issue is worth discussion: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2016/05/tax-the-rich-not-unhealthy-products.)

    I'd have no problem with a 3 cent an ounce tax on sugary drinks if the cash went to healthcare
  • adremarkadremark Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member Member, Premium Posts: 775 Member
    I chalk that up to bad parenting... parents need to set the standards in the house. Food, exercise, video games, toys, etc.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Member Posts: 2,582 Member Member Posts: 2,582 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    I chalk that up to bad parenting... parents need to set the standards in the house. Food, exercise, video games, toys, etc.
    I fully agree to that.

  • Christine_72Christine_72 Member Posts: 16,055 Member Member Posts: 16,055 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    I chalk that up to bad parenting... parents need to set the standards in the house. Food, exercise, video games, toys, etc.

    Definitely! I have told her a thousand times to stop bringing it into the house. But she is literally scared of what he'll do. If there is such as a thing as a 'sugar addiction', this kid has got it
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Related to the topic of this thread (public campaigns against soda and sugary drinks), here's an article about Philadelphia's proposed soda tax: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2016/04/08/473548273/philly-wants-to-tax-soda-to-raise-money-for-schools

    And here's an argument and debate (in the comments) re the proposal. (It's a left-leaning blog, but politics aside I think the underlying issue is worth discussion: http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2016/05/tax-the-rich-not-unhealthy-products.)

    I'd have no problem with a 3 cent an ounce tax on sugary drinks if the cash went to healthcare

    I pretty much agree, although it's kind of perverse as it gets subsidized (corn) -- better to just get rid of the subsidy, but of course that's not happening and would have much broader effects.
  • PackerjohnPackerjohn Member Posts: 4,859 Member Member Posts: 4,859 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    I chalk that up to bad parenting... parents need to set the standards in the house. Food, exercise, video games, toys, etc.

    Yep.
  • rankinsectrankinsect Member, Premium Posts: 2,238 Member Member, Premium Posts: 2,238 Member
    adremark wrote: »
    J72FIT wrote: »
    This sounds like you're saying it is inevitable...

    In some sense. I have the propensity for it. If I maintain my lifestyle and exercise level, I should hold it off. But the reality is that when I'm 80 I likely won't keep up the lifestyle and exercise regimen I do now. So, at some point I will develop diabetes. However, as diabetes is a long-term illness, it will not likely kill me before I die of something else first.

    As mentioned earlier, genetics plays a big factor in diabetes development and progression. Eating poorly and not exercising does not *cause* diabetes, at least not in the sense. But if you are genetically predisposed, and then eat poorly and don't exercise, you will develop it.

    SO does excess sugar consumption contribute to diabetes or not? My neighbours 14yr old son drinks soda every day, eats sweets all day and adds tbs of sugar to his already sugary cereal. His doctor has warned that he WILL get diabetes if he continues like this.

    The science isn't clearly settled on that matter. Some studies find a link, although not as strong as other factors (obesity, genetics, etc.) Other studies find no link that is not explained by other factors. It's extremely hard to do studies on diet in general since in most human studies, researchers attempt to correlate self-reported dietary data with various conditions, and that dietary data itself has a huge number of correlations to all facets of lifestyle that have to be corrected for as confounding factors.

    That's why we get all the confusing array of dietary recommendations - dietary studies are fairly unreliable, and often contradict each other depending on the specific population being studied and which confounding factors the researchers specifically identified and corrected for.

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