Running pain

I'm fairly new to running and I have a question. Every time I start running I get this pain on my right side under my breast, like under my ribs. It hurts really bad when I breath and it subsides after catching my breath and running a little more. Does anybody else have this? Or no what causes this?

Replies

  • Bluepegasus
    Bluepegasus Posts: 333 Member
    Sounds like a stitch. Slow down a bit and concentrate on breathing properly, controlled deep breaths.
  • acbraswell
    acbraswell Posts: 238 Member
    Sounds like a side stitch. When I get one, I slow to a walk, raise the arm on the side of the pain and bend toward the other side, stretching out the muscle with the pain. Best way to prevent is to strengthen the core (planks, bridges, etc).

    Good luck!
  • Akilah_green
    Akilah_green Posts: 19 Member
    Thanks for the help. I will slow it down
  • acbraswell
    acbraswell Posts: 238 Member
    These pains happened to me when I first started running. It's amazing how many muscles your body uses running! They tend to go away once your body adjusts, but I do still get them every now and then.
  • beemerphile1
    beemerphile1 Posts: 1,710 Member
    Side stitches are sometimes caused by spasmic breathing. Control your breathing and breath deeply. Pick a foot and a rhythm, like breath in on every second right foot strike or fourth or whatever works for you.

    Another trick that helps some people is to press your fist into your side as you continue to run.

    What you are really feeling is cramping due to diaphragm spasms.
  • yirara
    yirara Posts: 7,352 Member
    Yes, slow down! slow down so much that you can speak two coherent sentences. Build endurance from there and only later try to get faster.
  • CrossfitOCRunner
    CrossfitOCRunner Posts: 61 Member
    what they said. also, try to regulate your breathing. slowing down will help and practice on other forms of cardio like the bike or elliptical so you can focus on breathing and your pace.
  • autumnblade75
    autumnblade75 Posts: 1,657 Member
    Side stitches are sometimes caused by spasmic breathing. Control your breathing and breath deeply. Pick a foot and a rhythm, like breath in on every second right foot strike or fourth or whatever works for you.

    Another trick that helps some people is to press your fist into your side as you continue to run.

    What you are really feeling is cramping due to diaphragm spasms.

    If you're always getting a stitch in your right side, and you're breathing with the rhythm of the same foot each time, try switching sides. If you then get a stitch in the opposite side, it might be worthwhile to breathe in an odd numbered pattern with your foot strikes. I think I read that it was recommended to breathe in for 4 counts and out for 3, but it always felt more natural for me to have a longer exhale than inhale. Either way, I can't keep cadence with my music on a 7 count, so I lead with opposite feet every few minutes - I try to switch it up every new song.
  • autumnblade75
    autumnblade75 Posts: 1,657 Member
    Side stitches are sometimes caused by spasmic breathing. Control your breathing and breath deeply. Pick a foot and a rhythm, like breath in on every second right foot strike or fourth or whatever works for you.

    Another trick that helps some people is to press your fist into your side as you continue to run.

    What you are really feeling is cramping due to diaphragm spasms.

    If you're always getting a stitch in your right side, and you're breathing with the rhythm of the same foot each time, try switching sides. If you then get a stitch in the opposite side, it might be worthwhile to breathe in an odd numbered pattern with your foot strikes. I think I read that it was recommended to breathe in for 4 counts and out for 3, but it always felt more natural for me to have a longer exhale than inhale. Either way, I can't keep cadence with my music on a 7 count, so I lead with opposite feet every few minutes - I try to switch it up every new song.
  • sarabushby
    sarabushby Posts: 651 Member
    It could be utter nonsense and work by nothing more than distraction, but a running friend once told me that to get rid of a stitch you should concentrate on stomping down hard with the opposite foot whilst continuing your run. It should go away. It might not work for you but heck it's worth a try if you find you get another.
  • Akilah_green
    Akilah_green Posts: 19 Member
    thanks for all the great advice. I'll probably go running again later and try these techniques
  • Akilah_green
    Akilah_green Posts: 19 Member
    Side stitches are sometimes caused by spasmic breathing. Control your breathing and breath deeply. Pick a foot and a rhythm, like breath in on every second right foot strike or fourth or whatever works for you.

    Another trick that helps some people is to press your fist into your side as you continue to run.

    What you are really feeling is cramping due to diaphragm spasms.

    I noticed that when it happens if I press down on the spot it feels better
  • _Waffle_
    _Waffle_ Posts: 13,051 Member
    Side stitches are sometimes caused by spasmic breathing. Control your breathing and breath deeply. Pick a foot and a rhythm, like breath in on every second right foot strike or fourth or whatever works for you.

    Another trick that helps some people is to press your fist into your side as you continue to run.

    What you are really feeling is cramping due to diaphragm spasms.

    I noticed that when it happens if I press down on the spot it feels better

    I don't know if that's placebo or Tai chi but I found the same thing to be true for me. Applying some pressure to the spot the pain is in seemed to help it dissipate faster. :+1:
  • wonko221
    wonko221 Posts: 292 Member
    While doing c25k, i found the following breathing advice really helpful:

    belly-breathing (diaphragm breathing) - on the inhale, push your belly button out, letting your lungs fully expand. on the exhale, pull your belly button back toward your spine, squeezing the lungs from the bottom, pushing the air out fully.

    timing - find your right timing. I started by inhaling slowly for four steps, and exhaling slowly for four steps. Once i got to the point where i could maintain that, i played with it a bit. I've finally settled on inhaling for three steps, and exhaling for two steps. By maintaining a regular pattern, i know that when the pattern becomes difficult, i'm pushing too hard and need to slow down a bit.

    pace - keep your pace slow enough that you can breath easily, and could carry on a conversation, or at least a couple sentences, without being breathless. In the beginning, if you CAN run more slowly, than slow down! Once you find a slow, steady pace that you can maintain, you can start to slowly increase it. Once you've found a pace that is challenging but maintainable, work on increasing your distance at that pace.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,903 Member
    If you're always getting a stitch in your right side ...

    I got one of these a couple weeks ago in what was going to be the middle of a long run, but turned out to be the end of a medium one. Didn't want to keep going when I was in pain and injure myself, so I walked home. Told my girlfriend "I got this weird pain in my chest - don't worry, not like a heart attack - when I was running, right here" and she said "You got a side stitch." Looked it up and apparently most people only ever get them on the right side.

    One thing a fellow cyclist told me was to pay attention to your breathing, and to concentrate on exhaling fully. For whatever it's worth.
  • autumnblade75
    autumnblade75 Posts: 1,657 Member
    If you're always getting a stitch in your right side ...

    I got one of these a couple weeks ago in what was going to be the middle of a long run, but turned out to be the end of a medium one. Didn't want to keep going when I was in pain and injure myself, so I walked home. Told my girlfriend "I got this weird pain in my chest - don't worry, not like a heart attack - when I was running, right here" and she said "You got a side stitch." Looked it up and apparently most people only ever get them on the right side.

    One thing a fellow cyclist told me was to pay attention to your breathing, and to concentrate on exhaling fully. For whatever it's worth.

    I get them more frequently on my right side, but I've had them on both. Usually, the left side happens after I've switched to right foot strikes on 1 and 3 instead of 2 and 4. I really hate when I get a stitch in the left side right after the right side stitch. Without a few solid minutes of recovery time, the right stitch will come right back. Haven't had that happen lately - hope to keep it that way.
  • webbz92
    webbz92 Posts: 38 Member
    I got side stitches frequently when I was getting into running shape. I felt better after I took deep breaths and breathe through the pain for a few moments. As my body adjusted to running and cardio exercise, the stitches stopped happening.