How long before you started to see results from strength training?

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Replies

  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member
    I've been strength training (free weights, leg press, assisted pull ups) and following a meal plan as advised by trainer for a good 6 weeks now. I haven't yet progressed to squat lifts and deadlifts. I've dropped body fat by 2% and I've noticed an improvement with my stamina. I guess I was expecting to see more of a change in my body. I used to quite like my natural shape and waist to hip ratio. Although I feel fitter, I feel less "shapely" now. I was just wondering how long it took before others, particularly women, could see a noticeable difference from strength training?

    You need to be more specific on your goals, training plan, and eating plan to get any useful input.

    Do you want more muscle, strength, endurance, or just show off what is underneath? You said strength training but it doesn't sound like a strength plan.

    A non-progressive lifting plan isn't much of a strength plan.

    Calories surplus or deficit makes a difference in how your body builds or doesn't build muscle.

    Update and let us know.
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    I started strength training right when I started losing weight so I have nothing to compare it to. I have a physique in mind and yes, I lost enough weight at one point where I lost my curves. BUT...then I bulked and built them back with muscle (and a little fat too). It's a process! I've been doing this for almost 2 years but I had 30-40lbs to lose first.
  • a_hounslow09
    a_hounslow09 Posts: 36 Member
    It depends on you, your body, how hard your pushing yourself, how heavy you're lifting, how much protein you're getting, etc. I can see decent results after 3 months but 6 years ago I was a pretty serious lifter so I know what to do and have the "muscle memory" for it.
  • chonji4ever
    chonji4ever Posts: 120 Member
    Major muscle building will require a calorie surplus and lots of protein instead of a deficit. There are a lot of modes of thought around how to minimize fat gains during muscle bulking, but you're going to to need to make a plan for how you'll want to cycle between bulking and cutting.

    One of the best strength building routines I've seen is the powerlifting PPL (push, pull, legs) routine. It has you only lifting 3 days per week, but that works perfectly for muscle recovery. Muscles require 4-7 days to repair from a workout, so this routine will allow you to be near 100% recovered each time you hit a muscle group. This will also allow you to increase the weight each week. You should lift 50-80% of your one rep max for every set after warming up. Do 3 sets of 4-6 reps for each exercise. When you can do more than 6 reps with a weight, then it's time to increase the weight.

    If you have communicated that your goal is to build muscle to your trainer and his advice is drastically different than the above, then it might be time to think about a different trainer that is more knowledgeable or has better communication skills.

  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    edited May 2016
    OP I remember your first post. I can see a difference in your stomach now.
  • fernadele313
    fernadele313 Posts: 51 Member
    Major muscle building will require a calorie surplus and lots of protein instead of a deficit. There are a lot of modes of thought around how to minimize fat gains during muscle bulking, but you're going to to need to make a plan for how you'll want to cycle between bulking and cutting.

    One of the best strength building routines I've seen is the powerlifting PPL (push, pull, legs) routine. It has you only lifting 3 days per week, but that works perfectly for muscle recovery. Muscles require 4-7 days to repair from a workout, so this routine will allow you to be near 100% recovered each time you hit a muscle group. This will also allow you to increase the weight each week. You should lift 50-80% of your one rep max for every set after warming up. Do 3 sets of 4-6 reps for each exercise. When you can do more than 6 reps with a weight, then it's time to increase the weight.

    If you have communicated that your goal is to build muscle to your trainer and his advice is drastically different than the above, then it might be time to think about a different trainer that is more knowledgeable or has better communication skills.

    My trainer has been a great support pushing me with my cardio endurance and meal plan. The advice I got is that I need to work on more of a "base level of fitness" before progressing to any kind of heavy lifting programme...?
  • fernadele313
    fernadele313 Posts: 51 Member
    arditarose wrote: »
    OP I remember your first post. I can see a difference in your stomach now.

    Thank you. My core feels stronger now and balance has improved. My mid section has never been my problem area. I've always carried fat on my thighs and hips. I don't want to lose my shape. I'd like to replace the fullness of my legs and hips with muscle
  • shor0814
    shor0814 Posts: 559 Member

    My trainer has been a great support pushing me with my cardio endurance and meal plan. The advice I got is that I need to work on more of a "base level of fitness" before progressing to any kind of heavy lifting programme...?

    And what objective measures are being used to determine that "base level of fitness" so you know when you are ready? If you truly want to get stronger you are going to have to increase something in your lifting program (weight, reps, sets). If you want more muscle you are going to have to eat at a surplus of some sort.

    More details are better than less.
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    arditarose wrote: »
    OP I remember your first post. I can see a difference in your stomach now.

    Thank you. My core feels stronger now and balance has improved. My mid section has never been my problem area. I've always carried fat on my thighs and hips. I don't want to lose my shape. I'd like to replace the fullness of my legs and hips with muscle

    So you have a better physique than I do but I also am very bottom heavy. If you want to make changes to your legs/physique like that you NEED to start lifting, lifting heavy, and and have a progressive overload.

    I cut down fat as low as I could, and still had fatty thighs. But at that point all of my ribs were showing so I said screw it and started a bulk, gaining weight to build muscle. Now my thighs are bigger again but they look much better. The muscle has given them better shape and the skin has tightened up.
  • fernadele313
    fernadele313 Posts: 51 Member
    arditarose wrote: »
    arditarose wrote: »
    OP I remember your first post. I can see a difference in your stomach now.

    Thank you. My core feels stronger now and balance has improved. My mid section has never been my problem area. I've always carried fat on my thighs and hips. I don't want to lose my shape. I'd like to replace the fullness of my legs and hips with muscle

    So you have a better physique than I do but I also am very bottom heavy. If you want to make changes to your legs/physique like that you NEED to start lifting, lifting heavy, and and have a progressive overload.

    I cut down fat as low as I could, and still had fatty thighs. But at that point all of my ribs were showing so I said screw it and started a bulk, gaining weight to build muscle. Now my thighs are bigger again but they look much better. The muscle has given them better shape and the skin has tightened up.

    You have a great physique!
  • fernadele313
    fernadele313 Posts: 51 Member
    Some great advice here. Thank you guys
  • BhangraPrince
    BhangraPrince Posts: 123 Member
    Before and after

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    1cz9batybm44.jpeg

    Hot diggity
  • lithezebra
    lithezebra Posts: 3,671 Member
    edited May 2016
    I stopped lifting for a while to focus on rehabbing my knee. I started seeing results when I started again, pretty fast, like maybe 4 weeks in. I felt results a lot sooner. I think I carry myself differently when I'm lifting.
  • ObsidianMist
    ObsidianMist Posts: 519 Member
    I'm 2 months in and I see slightly more definition in my shoulders, but nowhere else yet.
  • PandoraGreen721
    PandoraGreen721 Posts: 450 Member
    I have progressively added reps/sets/weight...so my changes have been slow but steady.
  • Buff_Man
    Buff_Man Posts: 622 Member
    Your body will adapt so you need to keep progressing. Either by increasing reps/sets/weights or changing the exercises. You need at least 8-12 weeks of consistent effort including diet to see real results.
  • _benjammin
    _benjammin Posts: 1,224 Member
    You should see results by getting better at doing whatever you are doing in 6 weeks. Seeing in the mirror...will depend. You look great. Find a new trainer that will help you progress with your goals.