Toning up to loose weight ..?

Hello~

So at the moment I think I have a decent amount of muscle under my fat, but I'm far from strong or toned.

What I want to do is tone up, but I was wondering if it is better to loose the weight first or can I do both simultaneously?

My current lifestyle

I've cut down calorie intake to 1500 (I use to eat ALOT haha)
But on the days I go gym, I eat an extra 300-500 cals of protein and the good fats ..

I can't stand cardio.. I can run about 10mins max before breaking down, I do the cross trainer usually as my warm up for about 10 mins, then depending on how I feel I do a full body weights session,
12-15 reps X 3 sets, per muscle group etc.
all at different weights but to their maximum.

Like for example, today;
Shoulder press, seated row, triceps extent ion, curls, bench press, plank, push-ups, deadlifts and squats.

Then the next work out session would start from the feet up with less upper body work.

Sort of like a split training but still cover full body.

Do you think, if I keep lifting weights in aims of toning up, i can loose the fat? Or should I dedicate some days to fat loss?

I'd much rather lift weights than run hahha
«1

Replies

  • scottburger104
    scottburger104 Posts: 90 Member
    Good news. You are better off lifting weights anyways. I would recommend following a reputable plan like stronglifts, or 5-3-1. You can loose some weight and work on your strength and muscle tone at the same time.
  • FitnReady74
    FitnReady74 Posts: 10 Member
    edited June 2016
    Here is a tip you probley know already.. Eat less calories. If you eat less calories than this amount ( your calorie body maintaince level) , something awesome happens. Your body realizes that it doesn’t have enough calories to burn for energy, so it burns your own stored body fat for energy instead. This is how weight loss happens. Also this is a key foundation to toning up. You have muscle just need to burn that fat off that is on top of it... All the weight lifting and gym work is more geared for bulking up muscle mass. For toning up focus on cardio work out such as running or other activities that will burn calories..Also eat proteins will help. Start by lowering your calorie count by 20% of your body weight which should typically be .05-1 pound a week. And keep up the cardio work. Before you know it you will loose weight and look toned and fit... Any other questions let me know..
  • jessef593
    jessef593 Posts: 2,280 Member
    RGv2 wrote: »
    Here is a tip you probley know already.. Eat less calories. If you eat less calories than this amount ( your calorie body maintaince level) , something awesome happens. Your body realizes that it doesn’t have enough calories to burn for energy, so it burns your own stored body fat for energy instead. This is how weight loss happens. Also this is a key foundation to toning up. You have muscle just need to burn that fat off that is hidden it... All the weight lifting, gym work out will not get you there. Better to do more cardiovascular such as running or other activities that will burn calories..Also eat proteins will help also. Start by lowering your calorie count by 20% of your body weight which should typically be 1-2 pounds a week. And keep up the cardio work. Before you know it you will loose weight and look toned and fit... Any other questions let me know..

    Can you please explain the bolded? How would the OP "not get there" lifting weights in a deficit? That's basically exactly how you get there....

    OP, here's the deal. Make sure your logging is on point so you have a modist deficit. At that point do cardio for heart health (and if you like it), and then as was said above find a reputable progressive overload lifting program.

    When we eat in a deficit we lose water, fat, AND muscle. You may be muscular under the fat, but if you eat at too steep of deficit and don't add in some progressive overload you'll lose weight but some of that will be from LBM (muscle). So, even though you've lost weight your BF% may not change much.

    Where as if you add in a progressive lifting program with your deficit (and cardio) you're working to maintain muscle so most of your weight loss comes from water and fat. It's possible that you may not lose weight as fast, but it's quite possible that you'll lose BF% faster, so what you're doing is efficiently burning the fat covering the muscles you have so you reveal them and improve your "tone".

    Thank you. I'm glad someone said real facts so that didn't have to. OP just so you know, I've lost 10lbs in 2.5 months only lifting weights, I haven't done a single minute of cardio. As long as you're in a deficit it doesn't matter how you get there. Just ensure you're lifting progressively so that you're body retains muscle mass.

  • Bob314159
    Bob314159 Posts: 1,178 Member
    I'd like to add that you need to be careful about eating 300-500 calories extra on workout days. If your workouts are mostly lifting, you won't burn that many calories and may end up going over your calorie goal.

    So true
  • cnbbnc
    cnbbnc Posts: 1,265 Member
    I'll just do a quick rundown of what I've been doing. I love weights too, and am not a huge cardio fan. I stuck to my deficit, because without that...no weight is coming off. I picked a strength training program and started doing that 3-4xs/wk. I don't love cardio but think it does have its place for overall health, so about twice a week I would walk/jog for a half hour or so.

    Doing this (primarily lifting and watching my diet...with minimal cardio) I lost 40lbs, 20 inches, and my body fat has gone from around 30% to low 20's. In the past I had always dieted and done cardio, and wound up thin but very soft/jiggly all over. This time I switched to more weights, and I got leaner and a lot more firm overall.

    So in answer to your question...yes you can drop fat and start tightening everything up with the weights and deficit. I really would choose a beginner training program because it will give you a nice outline to follow so you keep progressing. Good luck!!! :smile:
  • cgvet37
    cgvet37 Posts: 1,189 Member
    I hate cardio that is not sport related. I weight train, sometimes I'll do circuit training. You loose weight with your diet, exercise is for overall health.
  • FitnReady74
    FitnReady74 Posts: 10 Member
    edited June 2016
    RGv-2 I disagree.. I tried that route, and was not satisfied with the results. All it accomplished was wasting my time at a gym lifting weights...
    Basically..what ever works for you stick with it.. Some learn the hard way others know what works. For me I stop lifting weights and have been focused on MMA based circuit training, push ups, planks, and cardio such as running mountains. I lowered my calorie intake to hit a certain body weight i need and do cardio to burn the fat and peak my endurance.. I look great and feel fantastic. Any one recreationally lifting weights going to the gym can not do what I am doing currently. That's the difference between I and most people, they work out because they want to. I do it cause it pays the bills and I need to. Big difference..Good luck in the gym..
  • FitnReady74
    FitnReady74 Posts: 10 Member
    It comes down to what a person wants to accomplish. Also genetics is a factor in one's ability to tone/lose weight or add muscle mass. I myself have always had good muscle tone and I am natually athletic also. So my genetics helped me accomplish being able to build muscle mass or in my case tone up quicker than someone who is not..Most people are not genetically gifted and really have to work hard... spend countless hours at the gym take supplements etc.. Glad I didn't have too.... It's all natural for me. Good luck..
  • RGv2
    RGv2 Posts: 5,785 Member
    edited June 2016
    RGv-2 I disagree.. I tried that route, and was not satisfied with the results. All it accomplished was wasting my time at a gym lifting weights...
    Basically..what ever works for you stick with it.. Some learn the hard way others know what works. For me I stop lifting weights and have been focused on MMA based circuit training, push ups, planks, and cardio such as running mountains. I lowered my calorie intake to hit a certain body weight i need and do cardio to burn the fat and peak my endurance.. I look great and feel fantastic. Any one recreationally lifting weights going to the gym can not do what I am doing currently. That's the difference between I and most people, they work out because they want to. I do it cause it pays the bills and I need to. Big difference..Good luck in the gym..

    That's fine if you disagree with myself and @jessef593 but that doesn't change the science.

    What I laid out;

    Moderate Deficit + Cardio (for heart health and so you can eat moar) + a progressive overload program (to maintain muscle so you lose mainly water and fat) = the most efficient way to lower BF% while maintaining the muscle you already have. It's basic recomp 101.

    Also, the body weight stuff that you're doing can also equate to a progressive overload program, you're just going about it a different way.

    An aside: I started in the gym because I needed to and because it paid the bills / paid for college. Not sure what that has to do with anything, but since you pointed it out I figured I might as well too.

  • cgvet37
    cgvet37 Posts: 1,189 Member
    I can honestly say I have never lost weight on cardio alone. I first started lifting in High School. I watched what I ate and read every body building magazine I could find. Seeing as we did not have internet back then. I did play sports recreationally. I was very active while in the service, but I ate like *kitten* and drank a lot. Fast forward and I was diagnosed with progressive spinal arthritis. I pretty much gave up on everything. I started working with a trainer, mostly for the nutritional help, and I have had great success. I have lost 27 lbs. and roughly 6-7% body fat. I don't do much cardio either. The biggest thing that changed was my diet.
  • Sharon_C
    Sharon_C Posts: 2,133 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    I can honestly say I have never lost weight on cardio alone. I first started lifting in High School. I watched what I ate and read every body building magazine I could find. Seeing as we did not have internet back then. I did play sports recreationally. I was very active while in the service, but I ate like *kitten* and drank a lot. Fast forward and I was diagnosed with progressive spinal arthritis. I pretty much gave up on everything. I started working with a trainer, mostly for the nutritional help, and I have had great success. I have lost 27 lbs. and roughly 6-7% body fat. I don't do much cardio either. The biggest thing that changed was my diet.

    Not to hijack the OP's post but I too have arthritis in my spine. Weight lifting has been a godsend. By strengthening my core and my back (very slowly I might add) I have eliminated all of my pain.

  • cgvet37
    cgvet37 Posts: 1,189 Member
    Sharon_C wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    I can honestly say I have never lost weight on cardio alone. I first started lifting in High School. I watched what I ate and read every body building magazine I could find. Seeing as we did not have internet back then. I did play sports recreationally. I was very active while in the service, but I ate like *kitten* and drank a lot. Fast forward and I was diagnosed with progressive spinal arthritis. I pretty much gave up on everything. I started working with a trainer, mostly for the nutritional help, and I have had great success. I have lost 27 lbs. and roughly 6-7% body fat. I don't do much cardio either. The biggest thing that changed was my diet.

    Not to hijack the OP's post but I too have arthritis in my spine. Weight lifting has been a godsend. By strengthening my core and my back (very slowly I might add) I have eliminated all of my pain.

    It has helped, but I still have pain. Some days better than others.
  • BillMcKay1
    BillMcKay1 Posts: 315 Member
    I hate the term "toning up". It immediately makes me think of some poor woman at the gym doing 700 curls with a 2lb dumbbell trying to "tone" her arms.

    You don't tone up muscle. You build muscle through progressive overload training and you reveal that muscle by stripping away body fat. You don't tone them.

    OP, I'm not a huge fan of cardio either. I do a good 30min walk up and down hill every morning and lift 3x a week. There are some great programs for beginner lifters, Stronglifts is my personal fav, but starting strength or 5-3-1 are also good.

    Cardio is important for a healthy cardiovascular system but to really change the way your body looks, strength training is the only way to go.
  • FitnReady74
    FitnReady74 Posts: 10 Member
    That's great you guys keep doing what you think works best for you.. Very few have the genetics to bulk up or stay fit ( not using tone) naturally. I have the genetics so it's easy for me...Just remember to lift weights with proper form...
    Thanks for all your comments... Good luck...
  • I'm also lifting weight with minimal cardiovascular, my question is I'm 9st and eating approx 1200 calories a day and haven't lost any weight in weeks, what should my calories be, I'm 5ft 3.?
  • arditarose
    arditarose Posts: 15,575 Member
    OP, if you want a better body composition just stick to your deficit, eat high protein, and do a weight training program that has you hitting a progressive overload. I wouldn't make up your own.