what's the best type of road bike?

I'm sorta new to this topic so I'm curious what the best type of road bike is. Is it different for men than woman? What do I look for when looking for a bike?
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Replies

  • Mandygring
    Mandygring Posts: 704 Member
    All I've heard is thin tires
  • Mandygring
    Mandygring Posts: 704 Member
    Hahaha :)
  • niblue
    niblue Posts: 339 Member
    Lots of great options. I like Specialized myself but there are plenty of others like Cannondale that make good bikes. In the UK the bikes from Boardman are great value.
  • Mandygring
    Mandygring Posts: 704 Member
    I'm in US
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,277 Member
    It depends on what you want to do with it. Go to a couple of local bike shops (not a big box) and start looking around. I'm partial to Specialized but really, it's about going in and trying a few different bikes to see what fits for you personally...there is no universal "best".

    Do not get a bike from a big box store like Wal-Mart...get a real bike...you will enjoy it much more and if you enjoy it you will use it.
  • wildtxn
    wildtxn Posts: 97 Member
    The only real difference between male/female bike design is the frame design in some cases but you might not find any difference in road bikes. frame size and fitment is the only difference. You will find a few differences in the high end bike shops whether you're planning on doing triathalons, sprints, cyclocross or just riding and most differences are primarily in the angle at which your body will be situated on the bike the other will be the tire/wheel setup. You could get a hybrid that will work decently in semi-offroad situations as well as on the road, or a pure road bike. Decide what your plans are and I would suggest talking to a sales rep somewhere to find your best options. I have a high end road bike but want another just for riding to work because I don't want to leave that high end of a bike parked outside all day. Your needs will steer you in the right path with a good salesman. After that's decided, the best thing you could possibly do is get a proper fitment for the bike and get it set up for you to allow for a comfortable ride and more so to prevent injury.
  • xmichaelyx
    xmichaelyx Posts: 883 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    It depends on what you want to do with it. Go to a couple of local bike shops (not a big box) and start looking around.

    This is best advice. Go to the shops and ask questions of knowledgeable people. There are way too many variables to find the answer online.
  • queenliz99
    queenliz99 Posts: 15,317 Member
    xmichaelyx wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    It depends on what you want to do with it. Go to a couple of local bike shops (not a big box) and start looking around.

    This is best advice. Go to the shops and ask questions of knowledgeable people. There are way too many variables to find the answer online.

    Seconding this^^ Go to your local bike store!!
  • CincyNeid
    CincyNeid Posts: 1,250 Member
    It depends on what you're looking for Not all road bikes are created equally. You've got Performance, Endurance, Gravel, Cyclocross, Fixed Gear/Single Speed, and Comfort. It depends on what you want to get out of it.

    I'm going to Echo the statement of go to a LBS [Local Bike Shop] and try some out and see what you like. And don't be afraid to go to a couple different shops. Specialized, Trek, Cannondale, Jamis, Felt or another other brand fits different people differently.

    as @cwolfman13 stated I am partial to Specialized myself. I have a Pitch, which is a mountain bike, and I have a Secteur which is an endurance frame. But I'm also looking for a performance bike and their Allez doesn't really do me justice but the Cannondale CAAD12 fits me like a glove. So don't be afraid to try different brands.

    The other thing I would recommend is look at the bikes Group Set and see what replacement parts are going to cost.
  • chrismitu
    chrismitu Posts: 9 Member
    And remember to have a budget in mind. As long as the bike fits you a lot of them will be pretty good. Plenty of good riders can get awesome time/speed on a budget aluminium framed bike. The difference betwen a £500 road bike and a £2500 one is a couple of seconds on a ride and letting other people know you can afford an expendive bike.
  • AdrianChr92
    AdrianChr92 Posts: 567 Member
    A word of advice. Pure road bikes are usually the most fragile off all bikes and more expensive to maintain. I'd recommend looking into a trekking bike
  • Mandygring
    Mandygring Posts: 704 Member
    Is that a brand?
  • royboy969
    royboy969 Posts: 219 Member
    Trekk is a brand. The first thing you need to decide is what you really want to do and then how much you want to spend. If you want it for just riding than a hybrid is the route you want. Trails would be more of a mountain bike. Just road and more distance than it would be a road bike. I ride at least 20 miles a day on a hybrid. Definitely recommend going to a bike store, not a sporting goods store to talk about what direction you want to go.
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,185 Member
    edited July 2016
    Mandygring wrote: »
    I'm sorta new to this topic so I'm curious what the best type of road bike is. Is it different for men than woman? What do I look for when looking for a bike?

    The best type is the one that suits your purposes and fits you.

    What do you want to do with the road bicycle?
  • socalrunner59
    socalrunner59 Posts: 149 Member
    I currently ride a Cannondale; two bikes prior were both Treks.

    Terrain: since you specifically asked about a road bike, I assume you want to ride pavement.

    Budget--bikes range from a few hundred to thousands. So set a budget that includes cost for bike, helmet, lock

    Woman specific bike: women's bike frames are smaller than men's bikes. Women's bikes will have shorter top tubes and narrower handle bars. The overall frame size will be scaled down as well. Handle bars should be the same width as your shoulders. The handle bar drop (distance from the curved end to the top of the handle bars) on a women's bike isn't as deep to allow easier access to the gear shifters and comfortable grip for smaller hands.

    Saddle: women's bikes are outfitted with a women's saddle. Women have wider pelvis than men, so a women's saddle will be wide and short. Men saddles are narrow and long.

    My philosophy is buy the best frame you can afford. You can always upgrade your drive train (pedals, cranks, cogs, derailleur, etc) but you can't upgrade your frame without buying a new bike. This go around I bought a carbon frame. Much lighter and maneuverable that my old aluminum frames.

    If you have an REI near you, check out the free bike maintenance class.

    REI also offer an in-depth bike maintenance class to learn how to fix/replace bike components. You bring your bike to the class for hands on training. Definitely worth the money if you become an avid biker.

  • Lisa_Ookoo
    Lisa_Ookoo Posts: 134 Member
    It's better to have a moderately priced bike that fits you, than an expensive bike that doesn't fit. The fitting will include the size of the frame, the height and tilt of the seat, the width and position of the handlebars, and other variables based on your measurements and the type of riding you want to do. Good luck, have fun, try to check out a few different bike shops before you make a decision.
  • JosephGarrison6
    JosephGarrison6 Posts: 9 Member
    Real quick... local bike shop, buy something nice, pre-owned, with a comfortable seat. Get yourself something called a hybrid bike. Any name brand will do. Make sure it is the right size for you. Don't spend a ton of money until you prove to yourself that you will get a lot out of your bike. Buy a hybrid, with a comfortable seat. If you are not comfortable on it, you'll never ride it.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,894 Member
    OP, some good suggestions above. My two cents: Go to the bike shop and explain the type of riding you intend to do. Then you'll know whether a mountain bike, hybrid or a true road bike is the right tool for the job. After you know what type is needed, it is a decision based on other factors such as cost, fit and personal preference.
  • BrianSharpe
    BrianSharpe Posts: 9,206 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    It depends on what you want to do with it. Go to a couple of local bike shops (not a big box) and start looking around. I'm partial to Specialized but really, it's about going in and trying a few different bikes to see what fits for you personally...there is no universal "best".

    Do not get a bike from a big box store like Wal-Mart...get a real bike...you will enjoy it much more and if you enjoy it you will use it.

    ^^ This.....there are so many variables.

    Are you planning on racing? What's your budget (yes, you can spend $10K on a bike if you want...)?

    Probably the single most important thing is fit. Different manufacturers will have slight differences in frame geometry which can have a significant impact on riding comfort, try as many different bikes in your price range that you can. As far as quality goes you can't go wrong with Trek or Giant or Specialized or Cannondale or Felt etc etc etc

    If you're riding on fairly flat terrain the weight of the bike is less important but investing in decent wheels and tires with lower rolling resistance is worthwhile (other than improving your own physical fitness this is often one of the best upgrades to make to a bike)