Discover what's new & improved in the MyFitnessPal app!
We’re dedicated to helping you achieve your health and nutrition goals. And our newest features and updates? They do just that. Learn how we're making tracking your progress easier, faster, and more motivating than ever.

Nutritionist says my body is in starvation mode....will I ever recover?

Options
2»

Replies

  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,012 Member
    Options
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:
  • ouryve
    ouryve Posts: 572 Member
    Options
    amanymorad wrote: »
    3bambi3 wrote: »
    Yes, he is talking nonsense. No, his logic is not solid. Think about it: if you eat less than your body needs, how on earth would you GAIN weight? If starvation mode like he described was real, no one would ever die from lack of food. You gained weight because you were eating more calories than your body requires.

    What's the reasoning behind 9 meals a day? How many calories are you eating? Are you weighing your food on a scale? Also, how is he measuring changes in body composition?

    All that is required for weight loss is a calorie deficit; how you get there is entirely up to you.

    For me to go below my current metabolic rate, I will be eating less than 1190 cal a day (which is LESS than the recommended 1200 to begin with) with around 300 cal for example....so around 900 cal...how is that healthy??

    You're short, so your calorie targets are always going to be quite low <eyes husband enviously>. How fit and active are you, generally? When you don't have a lot of calories to play with, you can give yourself a little (or a lot) more simply by walking a little (or more) each day.
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,745 Member
    edited August 2016
    Options
    amanymorad wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    amanymorad wrote: »
    malibu927 wrote: »
    Dump your nutritionist. Starvation mode, as he explains it, is not a thing. Meal timing and frequency will not matter. The only thing that matters to losing weight is that you're in a calorie deficit. Log everything as accurately as possible (if you aren't using one yet, purchase a food scale to help you keep within your deficit).

    He used an InBody machine to calculate this deficit

    http://www.longevitymaxfitness.com/inbody 230 b.jpg

    what do you mean by "keep within deficit"??
    I'm very familiar with InBody scale since we have one and I use it in my gym with clients. All it shows is lean mass and fat mass % and the weight of each from your body. You can't get too much from deficit there because he only has an average of your BMR and NOT your TDEE.

    As stated, dump your nutritionist.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png


    If online BMR calculators tell me I ought to have a BMR of 1580....and the InBody said my BMR is 1185-1190........Where does that leave me ? :cold_sweat:
    It doesn't measure BMR.

    EDIT: It does give a BMR value, but whatever formula they use is inaccurate. I don't even use it with clients. I use a basic Harris/Benedict formula to calculate it with clients.
    Only true way to measure BMR is getting an indirect calorimetry done.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,745 Member
    edited August 2016
    Options
    .
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    kimny72 wrote: »
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:

    MFP won't allow me to go on less than 0.6 kgs a week, with a 1,200 calorie goal (which didn't get me anywhere when I did follow, accurately and consistently.....plateau then weight gain...even when I went as low as 800 cal)

    Yup, I'm 4.9 ft

    Thank you so much for your advice :smile:
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    LAMCDylan wrote: »
    I also suggest you work on the shame that is beneath all this. You also need to assert some boundaries with your father. Those kind of comments are damaging to people. Tell him in a respectful manner to not comment on your weight anymore. Explain how it bothers you and affects your life. Also, tell him that if he continues it will affect your relationship with him. See, I don't know how you are and whether or not you are an independent adult etc. Some people are afraid to stand up to their parents because a) they are dependent on them in some way and b) constantly seek their approval (which that part about being a stressing overachiever tells me you are).

    You can lose tons of weight but never be happy with yourself all because of the people you have in your life that fat shame you and basically criticize everything in your life. THAT is more important than losing the weight. Because, people often think that the reason for being treated poorly by others has to do with them. And that they are NOT OK just the way they are.


    Don't get me wrong...he's a GREAT dad and we have a very good relationship!! I have asked him not to comment and we've fought over it a few times...The comments have definitely been less frequent in the recent years, but old habits die hard I guess....I've learned to ignore them -to a certain level-

    Thank you for caring enough to post this though :smiley:<3
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    Options
    amanymorad wrote: »
    malibu927 wrote: »
    Dump your nutritionist. Starvation mode, as he explains it, is not a thing. Meal timing and frequency will not matter. The only thing that matters to losing weight is that you're in a calorie deficit. Log everything as accurately as possible (if you aren't using one yet, purchase a food scale to help you keep within your deficit).

    He used an InBody machine to calculate this deficit

    http://www.longevitymaxfitness.com/inbody 230 b.jpg

    what do you mean by "keep within deficit"??

    Okay, as I understand it, the InBody predicts BMR based on it's prediction of BF%, plus height and weight. If so, your BMR is "low" compared to your weight not because there's something wrong with you (let alone "starvation mode," which would make no sense), but because your BF% is higher than ideal. That's expected -- you are quite a bit overweight. (Not an insult, so was I when I started here, and it's what you want to change.)

    When I use the Katch-McArdle calculator that uses BF% and put in what I predict yours would be (based on mine when I was at a similar BMI), I get a number around 1200. When I use the scooby calculator (the ones that don't use BF% assume that yours is a healthy one), then it's quite a bit higher. The reason is that lean mass is what primarily determines BMR, not fat so much, and someone of a healthy weight at 174 lb is going to have a much higher BMR than someone who is only 4'11, even at the same weight.

    Thus, in telling you to eat as much as he is, your nutritionist is setting you up to gain. That's what's going on. I'm sorry you had to go through this, but it does mean it's not that hard to fix.
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    amanymorad wrote: »
    3bambi3 wrote: »
    amanymorad wrote: »
    3bambi3 wrote: »
    Yes, he is talking nonsense. No, his logic is not solid. Think about it: if you eat less than your body needs, how on earth would you GAIN weight? If starvation mode like he described was real, no one would ever die from lack of food. You gained weight because you were eating more calories than your body requires.

    What's the reasoning behind 9 meals a day? How many calories are you eating? Are you weighing your food on a scale? Also, how is he measuring changes in body composition?

    All that is required for weight loss is a calorie deficit; how you get there is entirely up to you.

    For me to go below my current metabolic rate, I will be eating less than 1190 cal a day (which is LESS than the recommended 1200 to begin with) with around 300 cal for example....so around 900 cal...how is that healthy??

    I think your nutritionist gave you your BMR. That is what is needed to keep you alive every day. Walking and exercise give you more calories.

    Yes!!! BMR!! how does that factor in?? when I logged into MFP it told me stick to 1200....I did that for a while, measured in gms everything I did (I cook from scratch 90% of the time I cook) and I still plateaued....Isn't it unhealthy to go below that ?? (though I did, 800 cal on averge, and still didn't lose weight)

    I am NOT underestimating my calorie intake...I made sure of that...I even factor in the spices XD

    How long is a while? if you are at 1200 per day then i would try to hit as close to that in NET calories as possible. 800 isn't enough food.

    also, 1200 is usually recommended for a 2lb a week loss, which is pretty aggressive. if your caloric intake is really that low and you aren't losing weight then i think it is time to see a doctor to rule out any medical conditions which may be affecting your ability to lose weight.

    *edited for typo

    Already checked my thyroid glands (hormones) and all seems natural...Idk what else could be causing this...
    Thank you for following the thread though <3
  • B4Rachael
    B4Rachael Posts: 155 Member
    Options
    Here is a helpful BMR/TDEE calculator created by an MFP user; use it to figure out what your daily calorie intake should be. sailrabbit.com/bmr/
  • 3bambi3
    3bambi3 Posts: 1,650 Member
    Options
    OP, would you mind opening your diary? Might give a better idea of where you can tighten up your logging.

    my home-->settings-->diary settings. It's at the bottom of the page under 'diary sharing.' Change the radio button to say 'public'
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,012 Member
    Options
    amanymorad wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:

    MFP won't allow me to go on less than 0.6 kgs a week, with a 1,200 calorie goal (which didn't get me anywhere when I did follow, accurately and consistently.....plateau then weight gain...even when I went as low as 800 cal)

    Yup, I'm 4.9 ft

    Thank you so much for your advice :smile:

    I don't think you've answered this - are you using a food scale? How often? Or are you using measuring cups and spoons?
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    ouryve wrote: »
    amanymorad wrote: »
    3bambi3 wrote: »
    Yes, he is talking nonsense. No, his logic is not solid. Think about it: if you eat less than your body needs, how on earth would you GAIN weight? If starvation mode like he described was real, no one would ever die from lack of food. You gained weight because you were eating more calories than your body requires.

    What's the reasoning behind 9 meals a day? How many calories are you eating? Are you weighing your food on a scale? Also, how is he measuring changes in body composition?

    All that is required for weight loss is a calorie deficit; how you get there is entirely up to you.

    For me to go below my current metabolic rate, I will be eating less than 1190 cal a day (which is LESS than the recommended 1200 to begin with) with around 300 cal for example....so around 900 cal...how is that healthy??

    You're short, so your calorie targets are always going to be quite low <eyes husband enviously>. How fit and active are you, generally? When you don't have a lot of calories to play with, you can give yourself a little (or a lot) more simply by walking a little (or more) each day.

    I'm really active, but not at all fit XD as in, I'm an actress (hobby) so when I have a show coming up , it's 12 hour rehearsals 7 days a week, in which we do not stand still...i also use public transportation and walk everywhere.....but when I'm at home, I'm the couch-iest couch potato you'll ever meet....I do not have an exercise schedule, because frankly, I hate exercising....I used to dance for a year with professional training for performances, but not anymore (long story).

    If I already need to consume very few calories, wouldn't exercising be counter-productive ? (other than the endorphin and feeling light and fit and blah blah blah...)
  • Jcl81
    Jcl81 Posts: 154 Member
    edited August 2016
    Options
    It should be called metabolic damage or metabolic adaptation, not starvation mode.

    It doesn't mean it's forever though.
  • VeryKatie
    VeryKatie Posts: 5,953 Member
    edited August 2016
    Options
    kimny72 wrote: »
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:

    1 lb = 0.45 kg. Still a good suggestion for weight loss/week. This post has good advice.
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,012 Member
    Options
    VeryKatie wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:

    1 lb = 0.45 kg. Still a good suggestion for weight loss/week. This post has good advice.

    Darn it, I converted backwards :angry:
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    kimny72 wrote: »
    amanymorad wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    • Enter your stats into MFP and choose a goal of one lb per week (that's 2 kgs)
    • If you don't have one, get a food scale.
    • Use the food scale for everything you eat except for liquids - this includes pre-packaged items, nut butters, yogurt, everything.
    • Log everything accurately and consistently. Eat to your calorie goal.
    • Log your exercise and eat back some of those calories

    Meal timing, types of foods, number of meals... these are all personal preference. All that matters for weight loss is eating less calories than you burn.

    If I'm doing the math correctly, you are under 5', yes? When you are that short, you just don't have as many calories to work with. You might actually want to settle on a goal of 1 kg a week for now just to make it a little easier.

    Please take a deep breath. You will not lose weight every week, even if you are perfect. You do not have to follow a bunch of "food rules" unless they make it easier for you to eat the correct amount of calories. Take care of yourself, and good luck :drinker:

    MFP won't allow me to go on less than 0.6 kgs a week, with a 1,200 calorie goal (which didn't get me anywhere when I did follow, accurately and consistently.....plateau then weight gain...even when I went as low as 800 cal)

    Yup, I'm 4.9 ft

    Thank you so much for your advice :smile:

    I don't think you've answered this - are you using a food scale? How often? Or are you using measuring cups and spoons?

    scale...always (recently)

    I didn't use to count calories before....only did it for a short while in 2015 (like a month)
  • Nikion901
    Nikion901 Posts: 2,467 Member
    edited August 2016
    Options
    Don't know about the credentials of your nutritionist, it that person is certified or not ... and a lot of advice you have been given scoffs at the advice you got from yours.

    However ... not calling it 'starvation mode' ... when I was in my early 30's I had a very low metabolism that came about from improper eating during my do's. My medical doctor advised me to stop dieting and to slowly increase my daily caloric intake even though that would cause me to gain weight. He wanted me to keep it up until I stopped gaining weight ... and that took many months, not a few weeks.

    edited to correct ... during my twenties, not during my do's ... stupid spell check/word finisher!
    get's me every time!
  • amanymorad
    amanymorad Posts: 11 Member
    Options
    Nikion901 wrote: »
    Don't know about the credentials of your nutritionist, it that person is certified or not ... and a lot of advice you have been given scoffs at the advice you got from yours.

    However ... not calling it 'starvation mode' ... when I was in my early 30's I had a very low metabolism that came about from improper eating during my do's. My medical doctor advised me to stop dieting and to slowly increase my daily caloric intake even though that would cause me to gain weight. He wanted me to keep it up until I stopped gaining weight ... and that took many months, not a few weeks.

    edited to correct ... during my twenties, not during my do's ... stupid spell check/word finisher!
    get's me every time!

    how many "months"? and then what did you do?
  • Bob314159
    Bob314159 Posts: 1,178 Member
    Options
    xsix wrote: »
    He is telling you the truth, but its not as bad as it sounds. Start eating again and keep working out .people that fast go into starvation mode all the time, and seem to be ok.

    There is no such thing as "starvation mode." An old myth (i.e. excuse) that won't go away.

    Starvation Mode: Is It A Myth? Is It Real? Is Your Body In It Right Now?

    For sure it's magic weird science