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"Newbie gains" how long does this last?

successgal1
successgal1 Posts: 996 Member
edited December 2016 in Fitness and Exercise
Ok so stats: (and a long ramble)

Female age 50
weighed in at 166.2 just now, was 165.8 2 weeks ago
Calories set for sedentary at 1200 for 1.5 loss
I weigh and/or measure all my food and shoot for 1100 figuring any errors will compensate up to 1200.
Diary is open. I usually hit close to if not nail my macros. I'm not overly tired or fatigued.
I drink lots of water.
I took my measurements a week ago.
I use a fitbit charge HR to tell me of activity, and set it on workout mode for actual workouts.
I only get 5-7 hours sleep, I try to sleep more but when I wake up I remember who was elected president and I can no longer sleep. :-/ So stressed a bit.

OK to the meat of my post. How long does water retention/stiffness from working out (having not worked out in months) last? When will my scale move in a downward direction again?

This is the part where I get discouraged in my "journey" having tried multiple times before so technical answers are appreciated since I think technically. Last time I worked out with eating back half my calories and lost 20 lbs but it took so long, was so exhausting (I probably overdid the workouts) and I lost to 167, stalled at 173 and got discouraged and fell of the wagon. I gained back up to 177 so This time I lost 10 lbs by diet alone, then picked up exercise for fitness and shape and to have a few more calories to play with. I have a vacation in March.

I weigh daily and yes I read all the forums of conflicting information. Basically I started this (again) the beginning of November and have lost 10-11 lbs. Then hit a stall and wanted to build up calorie deficit for the holiday so I picked up cycling again. I cycle every other day, 9 miles currently at 6-7mph and an hour. Not my personal best, I'm out of shape. I'm reliably informed that I probably burn about 300 calories there, even though fitbit and endomondo give me even more. I only eat back half, if that, of workout calories. So I've done this for a week now, and my legs and lower back are still stiff and water logged but not sore, they do not recover fully to releasing water in 48 hours. On the days I don't cycle I do upper body freeweights. 3,5,8 and 10 lbs depending on the muscle. This takes about 45 minutes along with side leg lifts to hit the annoying bulging hip spot that cycling doesn't.

Upper body does not get as stiff, swollen as lower body.

So, I can appreciate that maybe I'm losing more fat, and gaining/strengthening some muscles. I can certainly feel the muscles. But I'm the type of person that needs to see the scale move.

Last time I was fit and thin I was about 143, last time I was thin but not fit I was 128. So I KNOW the scale needs to move. But when will it? I've gone up from the 165 and have been stuck at the 166 for 2 weeks or so.

Just frustrated! Whats a girl gotta do to get some scale satisfaction?



«13

Replies

  • trigden1991
    trigden1991 Posts: 4,659 Member
    You have just started a new exercise programme so water retention is expected, as you acknowledged. For some it lasts days, others it lasts weeks. If you are hitting your calories consistently then you will be losing weight even if the scales don't show it.

    Keep consistent, chill out and you'll see results.
  • rileysowner
    rileysowner Posts: 7,806 Member
    What trigden said. It can take weeks, although for some it is only days. Stick to your calorie goal, and trust it is working. If it really bothers you, you may want to avoid the scale for a while since it is a very limited measure of progress. Remember the goal is fat loss, not simply weight loss.
  • successgal1
    successgal1 Posts: 996 Member
    Yeah I need people to tell me to chill more often. At least in this regard. :-)

    I weigh often because the scale is a motivator, when it moves down anyway. When it doesn't move, or goes up, I lose my motivator. That's where its easy for me to get discouraged and fall of the wagon.

    And now for the first time my DH is doing MFP with me and I have to talk HIM though all of this and its hard when I have my own issues!
  • Michael190lbs
    Michael190lbs Posts: 1,510 Member
    so you cycle about 75 min every other day that is great and I agree with your TDEE the extra 300 total ( includes BMR calories spent) calories is probably dead on. I cycle 9-11 miles in 30 min HR is just under 130 my advice would be to move faster not a lot because it took me a while to get to where I am now but to up the intensity a little every week.

    My 2 cents burn the scale use the mirror and your jeans:) Good luck
  • successgal1
    successgal1 Posts: 996 Member
    so you cycle about 75 min every other day that is great and I agree with your TDEE the extra 300 total ( includes BMR calories spent) calories is probably dead on. I cycle 9-11 miles in 30 min HR is just under 130 my advice would be to move faster not a lot because it took me a while to get to where I am now but to up the intensity a little every week.

    My 2 cents burn the scale use the mirror and your jeans:) Good luck

    Your heart rate is under 130 at a 5 minute mile? Mines averaging 165 for the hour. I wear the fitbit so I don't over enthusiasm myself into bursting something. I used to do 12 miles in 70 Minutes with an average HR of 153. Right now at about 9 miles in 60. Some miles faster then others, and depends on headwind. It can get strong and I'm just riding a one speed, upright!
  • serapel
    serapel Posts: 502 Member
    Just frustrated! Whats a girl gotta do to get some scale satisfaction?

    lol...I feel the same as you, but with me, the scale is going up and I always used to weigh around 126 lbs (5'8"). I loved being thin esp. in my 20's bc of all the waify models. Now I weigh 131.5 lbs and have been gaining 1 lb per month consistently by eating an extra 150 cals a day with my training program...I call it a "compbulk" bc my body fat percentage is not really changing.

    Keep using your scale bc if your body is getting harder and the scale is not going down...you are losing fat and gaining muscle....recomposition of your body is a wonderful thing.

    Although you may think 50 is getting up there, there have been studies that show that a women aged 50 can do some serious muscle building and it's not that different than training as a 30 year old bc you have less estrogen. Recovery time takes longer, so you have to listen to your body as you go.

    I had a pulled glute and for the month of May, I couldn't do any leg exercises; it was brutal!!! If I were 20, that glute would have repaired itself within 1-2 weeks. That's the difference as you get older.

    I'm only 5 years younger than you and I have gained 4 lbs of muscle since April (confirmed with a Tena scale) (newbie effect).

  • Leadfoot_Lewis
    Leadfoot_Lewis Posts: 1,623 Member
    Probably not a post you want to read, but here's my $.02...

    You need to stop obsessing over the scale. Period. Water weight gain is so unpredictable in women that you are going to drive yourself nuts weighing every day. Make your obsession working hard in the gym & hitting your calories and macros, not the scale, eating back your calories, etc. Let the mirror and how your clothes fit be your motivation, NOT the scale.

    Secondly it sounds like you're not lifting enough (3 lbs?) What sort of program are you running? Side leg lifts will do nothing for fat loss or a bulging hip (whatever that means). Find a good program and stick with it-one that has you lifting heavier and doing more compound lifts (squats, rows, etc.). A couple cardio sessions a week is fine.

    It's not a sprint it's a marathon. :) Be patient and work hard, you'll get there.
  • serapel
    serapel Posts: 502 Member
    Probably not a post you want to read, but here's my $.02...

    You need to stop obsessing over the scale. Period. Water weight gain is so unpredictable in women that you are going to drive yourself nuts weighing every day. Make your obsession working hard in the gym & hitting your calories and macros, not the scale, eating back your calories, etc. Let the mirror and how your clothes fit be your motivation, NOT the scale.

    Secondly it sounds like you're not lifting enough (3 lbs?) What sort of program are you running? Side leg lifts will do nothing for fat loss or a bulging hip (whatever that means). Find a good program and stick with it-one that has you lifting heavier and doing more compound lifts (squats, rows, etc.). A couple cardio sessions a week is fine.

    It's not a sprint it's a marathon. :) Be patient and work hard, you'll get there.

    I disagree here. In the beginning, she really does need to go light to allow her body to adapt to the new program and develop neuro adaptions. This phase can take about 2-3 months at 50 - going too fast can lead to injury. Body weight or low weight is best until the body has adapted and then progressive overload can begin.

    example of progression:

    Body weight glute bridge
    Feet elevated body weight glute bridge
    Shoulders and feet elevated body weight hip thrust
    Single leg shoulders elevated body weight hip thrust
    Light narrow barbell bilateral hip thrust
    Heavier narrow barbel bilateral hip thrust
    Olympic bar bilateral hip thrust
    Oympic bar plus weight bilateral hip thrust
    Progress the load until you've hit your max (I'm at 205 lbs now with olympic bar)

    another example of a squat progression:

    Body weight squat with exercise ball against the wall (with ISO hold)
    Body weight high box squat
    Body weight (lower the box as you get stronger) squat
    Parallel body weight box squat
    Parallel body weight box squat holding light weights
    Body weight goblet squat
    Goblet squat holding heavier and heavier weight
    Narrow barbell parallel squat
    Heavier narrow barbell parallel squat
    Olympic barbell parallel squat
    Olympic bar plus weights parallel squat

    - I cannot yet squat and I am still do almost parallet body weight box squats even though I'm able to hip thrust 205 lbs.

    - I highly recommend that a 50 year old woman begins to do the bar bell hip thrust progression above. This will be easy on the knees and will strengthen the posterior chain. a 50 year old woman will also see some amazing progression without damaging the joints.

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 39,832 Member
    DOMs will diminish in a week or two...

    As far as fluid retention goes, if you're using your muscles, you're always going to be retaining more fluid...which basically means you have a new base line to start with. Stop obsessing over the scale...it is just one of many tools, and frankly not the most useful tool in the tool box either...but it seems like that's all anyone cares about...some arbitrary number on a scale somehow defines them...baffles me.
  • successgal1
    successgal1 Posts: 996 Member
    Probably not a post you want to read, but here's my $.02...

    You need to stop obsessing over the scale. Period. Water weight gain is so unpredictable in women that you are going to drive yourself nuts weighing every day. Make your obsession working hard in the gym & hitting your calories and macros, not the scale, eating back your calories, etc. Let the mirror and how your clothes fit be your motivation, NOT the scale.

    Secondly it sounds like you're not lifting enough (3 lbs?) What sort of program are you running? Side leg lifts will do nothing for fat loss or a bulging hip (whatever that means). Find a good program and stick with it-one that has you lifting heavier and doing more compound lifts (squats, rows, etc.). A couple cardio sessions a week is fine.

    It's not a sprint it's a marathon. :) Be patient and work hard, you'll get there.

    Believe me I understand water retention in women. Believe me. I do all of the other things too but....

    Side leg lifts, work the muscles that run directly over the hip bone. Perhaps hip is the wrong term? The upper pelvis bulgy boney protrusion? Its where there is a pad of fat on me. Yes I know I can't spot reduce, but working that muscle(s) by doing side leg lifts reduces the bulge. Its different direction of movement then when cycling.

    3lbs is on my weakest muscles. Of which I have few to none almost to the point of atrophy in my left, outside upper arm, due to a flare up of bursitis a few months ago that made lifting my left arm to the side feel like I was lifting into the blade of a knife. It still hurts but I can work through it now. 5 lbs on the muscles that can take 5, 8 where I can and 10 where I can (bicep).

    Believe it or not I'm very non-fit in my upper body. Very very.

    Obviously as I get stronger I will up the weights. I've only done my second time through in 6 months, last night. And I'm feeling it this morning to clearly I'm doing enough.
  • serapel
    serapel Posts: 502 Member
    Probably not a post you want to read, but here's my $.02...

    You need to stop obsessing over the scale. Period. Water weight gain is so unpredictable in women that you are going to drive yourself nuts weighing every day. Make your obsession working hard in the gym & hitting your calories and macros, not the scale, eating back your calories, etc. Let the mirror and how your clothes fit be your motivation, NOT the scale.

    Secondly it sounds like you're not lifting enough (3 lbs?) What sort of program are you running? Side leg lifts will do nothing for fat loss or a bulging hip (whatever that means). Find a good program and stick with it-one that has you lifting heavier and doing more compound lifts (squats, rows, etc.). A couple cardio sessions a week is fine.

    It's not a sprint it's a marathon. :) Be patient and work hard, you'll get there.

    Believe me I understand water retention in women. Believe me. I do all of the other things too but....

    Side leg lifts, work the muscles that run directly over the hip bone. Perhaps hip is the wrong term? The upper pelvis bulgy boney protrusion? Its where there is a pad of fat on me. Yes I know I can't spot reduce, but working that muscle(s) by doing side leg lifts reduces the bulge. Its different direction of movement then when cycling.

    3lbs is on my weakest muscles. Of which I have few to none almost to the point of atrophy in my left, outside upper arm, due to a flare up of bursitis a few months ago that made lifting my left arm to the side feel like I was lifting into the blade of a knife. It still hurts but I can work through it now. 5 lbs on the muscles that can take 5, 8 where I can and 10 where I can (bicep).

    Believe it or not I'm very non-fit in my upper body. Very very.

    Obviously as I get stronger I will up the weights. I've only done my second time through in 6 months, last night. And I'm feeling it this morning to clearly I'm doing enough.

    Your routine is perfect. No worries!!! I'm 5 years younger than you, so I appreciate the middle age component of your progression ;)

    Did you see my suggestions above? Glute bridges would be great for you right now.
  • Leadfoot_Lewis
    Leadfoot_Lewis Posts: 1,623 Member
    edited December 2016
    I disagree here. In the beginning, she really does need to go light to allow her body to adapt to the new program and develop neuro adaptions. This phase can take about 2-3 months at 50 - going too fast can lead to injury. Body weight or low weight is best until the body has adapted and then progressive overload can begin.

    example of progression:

    Body weight glute bridge
    Feet elevated body weight glute bridge
    Shoulders and feet elevated body weight hip thrust
    Single leg shoulders elevated body weight hip thrust
    Light narrow barbell bilateral hip thrust
    Heavier narrow barbel bilateral hip thrust
    Olympic bar bilateral hip thrust
    Oympic bar plus weight bilateral hip thrust
    Progress the load until you've hit your max (I'm at 205 lbs now with olympic bar)

    another example of a squat progression:

    Body weight squat with exercise ball against the wall (with ISO hold)
    Body weight high box squat
    Body weight (lower the box as you get stronger) squat
    Parallel body weight box squat
    Parallel body weight box squat holding light weights
    Body weight goblet squat
    Goblet squat holding heavier and heavier weight
    Narrow barbell parallel squat
    Heavier narrow barbell parallel squat
    Olympic barbell parallel squat
    Olympic bar plus weights parallel squat

    So she needs to be lifting 3 lbs for 2-3 months for her body to "adapt"?-LOL! Injuries are mostly caused by bad form, not lifting more than 3 lbs. She needs to find a good program and keep to it, not a bunch of variations of hip bridges and and body squats.
    - I cannot yet squat and I am still do almost parallet body weight box squats even though I'm able to hip thrust 205 lbs.

    Yes, we know you can Hip Thrust 205lbs (you've mentioned it twice in your response). Irrelevant to the OP or this thread, but I would working on mobility if I was you. EVERYONE should be able to do a body weight squat to parallel. There was a thread early this week about this. I'd suggest you read my advice in that thread.
    - I highly recommend that a 50 year old woman begins to do the bar bell hip thrust progression above. This will be easy on the knees and will strengthen the posterior chain. a 50 year old woman will also see some amazing progression without damaging the joints.



    Again, how is she going to be "damaging her joints"?
  • Leadfoot_Lewis
    Leadfoot_Lewis Posts: 1,623 Member
    edited December 2016
    Believe me I understand water retention in women. Believe me. I do all of the other things too but....

    Side leg lifts, work the muscles that run directly over the hip bone. Perhaps hip is the wrong term? The upper pelvis bulgy boney protrusion? Its where there is a pad of fat on me. Yes I know I can't spot reduce, but working that muscle(s) by doing side leg lifts reduces the bulge. Its different direction of movement then when cycling.


    Compare leg lifts to an exercise like a basic parallel squat (which works all the muscles in legs) - which sounds better? You want to get the best "bang for your buck" when you're working out. I guarantee you if you start doing bodyweight squats to parallel and progress from there, it will help that area out for you.
    3lbs is on my weakest muscles. Of which I have few to none almost to the point of atrophy in my left, outside upper arm, due to a flare up of bursitis a few months ago that made lifting my left arm to the side feel like I was lifting into the blade of a knife. It still hurts but I can work through it now. 5 lbs on the muscles that can take 5, 8 where I can and 10 where I can (bicep).

    The goal is always to increase weight, as your body is very intelligent and will adapt to the stresses you put in through. So if you do 3lbs for 8 reps for a couple of weeks your body has most likely adapted to that weight. So you need to either increase the reps or increase the weight (as you long as you keep good form at a higher height).

    Also, I am dealing with a "cranky" shoulder as you are. :/ I'd suggest if something hurts, don't do it. Can you overhead press dumbbells without pain? I'd suggest that over a lateral raise that causes pain.

  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    Probably not a post you want to read, but here's my $.02...

    You need to stop obsessing over the scale. Period. Water weight gain is so unpredictable in women that you are going to drive yourself nuts weighing every day. Make your obsession working hard in the gym & hitting your calories and macros, not the scale, eating back your calories, etc. Let the mirror and how your clothes fit be your motivation, NOT the scale.

    Secondly it sounds like you're not lifting enough (3 lbs?) What sort of program are you running? Side leg lifts will do nothing for fat loss or a bulging hip (whatever that means). Find a good program and stick with it-one that has you lifting heavier and doing more compound lifts (squats, rows, etc.). A couple cardio sessions a week is fine.

    It's not a sprint it's a marathon. :) Be patient and work hard, you'll get there.

    All the lift heavy, lift heavy, lift heavy mantra around here neglects the point that people reading this advice are sometimes older women like the OP.

    Older people need to ease into lifting heavy, and if they have joint issues, it can take them a very long time to get to the point where lifting heavy is even possible.

    Starting out with bodyweight, graduating to light weights, and mastering form is very important for older individuals. Preventing injury is very important.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    Believe me I understand water retention in women. Believe me. I do all of the other things too but....

    Side leg lifts, work the muscles that run directly over the hip bone. Perhaps hip is the wrong term? The upper pelvis bulgy boney protrusion? Its where there is a pad of fat on me. Yes I know I can't spot reduce, but working that muscle(s) by doing side leg lifts reduces the bulge. Its different direction of movement then when cycling.


    Compare leg lifts to an exercise like a basic parallel squat (which works all the muscles in legs) - which sounds better? You want to get the best "bang for your buck" when you're working out. I guarantee you if you start doing bodyweight squats to parallel and progress from there, it will help that area out for you.
    3lbs is on my weakest muscles. Of which I have few to none almost to the point of atrophy in my left, outside upper arm, due to a flare up of bursitis a few months ago that made lifting my left arm to the side feel like I was lifting into the blade of a knife. It still hurts but I can work through it now. 5 lbs on the muscles that can take 5, 8 where I can and 10 where I can (bicep).

    The goal is always to increase weight, as your body is very intelligent and will adapt to the stresses you put in through. So if you do 3lbs for 8 reps for a couple of weeks your body has most likely adapted to that weight. So you need to either increase the reps or increase the weight (as you long as you keep good form at a higher height).

    Also, I am dealing with a "cranky" shoulder as you are. :/ I'd suggest if something hurts, don't do it. Can you overhead press dumbbells without pain? I'd suggest that over a lateral raise that causes pain.

    Older untrained individuals can't just go in and tear up the gym like young kids can.

    Speaking from experience here.
  • serapel
    serapel Posts: 502 Member
    I disagree here. In the beginning, she really does need to go light to allow her body to adapt to the new program and develop neuro adaptions. This phase can take about 2-3 months at 50 - going too fast can lead to injury. Body weight or low weight is best until the body has adapted and then progressive overload can begin.

    example of progression:

    Body weight glute bridge
    Feet elevated body weight glute bridge
    Shoulders and feet elevated body weight hip thrust
    Single leg shoulders elevated body weight hip thrust
    Light narrow barbell bilateral hip thrust
    Heavier narrow barbel bilateral hip thrust
    Olympic bar bilateral hip thrust
    Oympic bar plus weight bilateral hip thrust
    Progress the load until you've hit your max (I'm at 205 lbs now with olympic bar)

    another example of a squat progression:

    Body weight squat with exercise ball against the wall (with ISO hold)
    Body weight high box squat
    Body weight (lower the box as you get stronger) squat
    Parallel body weight box squat
    Parallel body weight box squat holding light weights
    Body weight goblet squat
    Goblet squat holding heavier and heavier weight
    Narrow barbell parallel squat
    Heavier narrow barbell parallel squat
    Olympic barbell parallel squat
    Olympic bar plus weights parallel squat

    So she needs to be lifting 3 lbs for 2-3 months for her body to "adapt"?-LOL! Injuries are mostly caused by bad form, not lifting more than 3 lbs. She needs to find a good program and keep to it, not a bunch of variations of hip bridges and and body squats.
    - I cannot yet squat and I am still do almost parallet body weight box squats even though I'm able to hip thrust 205 lbs.

    Yes, we know you can Hip Thrust 205lbs (you've mentioned it twice in your response). Irrelevant to the OP or this thread, but I would working on mobility if I was you. EVERYONE should be able to do a body weight squat to parallel. There was a thread early this week about this. I'd suggest you read my advice in that thread.
    - I highly recommend that a 50 year old woman begins to do the bar bell hip thrust progression above. This will be easy on the knees and will strengthen the posterior chain. a 50 year old woman will also see some amazing progression without damaging the joints.



    Again, how is she going to be "damaging her joints"?

    I'm 45 so I've been going through this myself. I've gained a lot of knowledge on my journey and I'm sharing to help this lady with the best of intentions.

    and yes I'm damn proud to bbht 205 lbs.
  • Leadfoot_Lewis
    Leadfoot_Lewis Posts: 1,623 Member

    Older untrained individuals can't just go in and tear up the gym like young kids can.

    Speaking from experience here.

    Tearing it up? Maybe. I just want to see her progress which=results. She's not made of glass. If she's smart about progressing the weights she will see results.

    FWIW-I'm not that far behind you gals in age. :) I still tear it up (and sometimes feel it the next day- :D ) I lift weights as I always have. The one thing I do differently is I spend about 15 minutes on mobility work before I even touch a weight. The difference it has made is incredible.
  • serapel
    serapel Posts: 502 Member

    Older untrained individuals can't just go in and tear up the gym like young kids can.

    Speaking from experience here.

    Tearing it up? Maybe. I just want to see her progress which=results. She's not made of glass. If she's smart about progressing the weights she will see results.

    FWIW-I'm not that far behind you gals in age. :) I still tear it up (and sometimes feel it the next day- :D ) I lift weights as I always have. The one thing I do differently is I spend about 15 minutes on mobility work before I even touch a weight. The difference it has made is incredible.

    If I followed your advice, and I wouldn't, I would injure myself trying to get there too quickly.

    At 50, slow and steady wins the race.
  • successgal1
    successgal1 Posts: 996 Member
    Thanks for the routine variation suggestions. I had to google "glute bridge" and will google some of the others later on.

    My legs are actually in fairly decent shape as I had to lug my 177 lb body around on them and actually can do deep knee bends and rising again without using assistance. I get a fairly good workout on the majority of my legs and glutes by virtue of cycling. Cycling is my cardio.

    However, things like "glute bridges" are actually part of my "pilates conditioning for weight loss" DVD which I will be using again to change things up a bit when needed. Its a wonderful routine for slimming my waist actually, though right now fat loss is needed there mostly.

    "Body weight squat with exercise ball against the wall (with ISO hold)
    Body weight high box squat
    Body weight (lower the box as you get stronger) squat"

    I can squat, though again with the cycling I think too much of that is overkill at this point given that an hour of cycling works the legs similarly. However, I did have an ANCIENT calesthetics VHS (thrift stores are awesome) that focused on Isometric exercise, and I totally lost it in a hurricane. It was super slimming when I was already around 135 it brought my waist in another inch, I went from an 8 to a 6. I looked awesome in those bodysuits under jeans that were popular in the early 2000's. I still have them as a matter of fact. So thank you for reminding me of ISO in addition to pilates.

    Another workout I like to do when I'm more fit is Cardio Sculpt with "fanny lifter" box https://www.amazon.com/Firm-Sculpting-System-Cardio-Sculpt/dp/B00008LE00 There's way too many squats in there for my liking, lol, with weights on my shoulders and the box to catch me if I need it.

    I also have an entire bookshelf of additonal DVD's and VHS tapes of some things I loved (billy blanks!) and Donna Richardson I remember being shorter, as high intensity as I wanted to go, workouts, when I was thinner. Found it on youtube the "kick and jab" portion I loved, it starts around 21:47

    I have multiple The Firm sets, seriously I have like 30? Different videos, a resistance band wall mount (made by moi) etc etc. Oh and lets not forget my old standby, Jane Fonda's Low Impact Step Aerobic workout. I bought it new in 92 and still have my steps!

    But I need fat gone. Just cycling alone raises my heart rate pretty high, I need to be more fit for half the videos I have!

    Oh and injury, the bursitis with corresponding neck problems and a bulging disc in my back is courtesy of an 18 year old driver who rear ended me at a stop light. I have some mildish, if I'm careful, pain and stiffness in my left hip from a sedentary standing job I no longer have. (thank goodness) And I'm getting to old to be interested in going too fast with working out when its calories in versus calories out will supposedly accomplish my fat loss goals. (having faith!)

    Did you know I used my resistance bands wrong last November? While having no upper body muscles I allowed the bands to overstretch my rib cage, and thats when I found out you can dislocate a rib. I did not know you could dislocate a rib. Turns out you can and I did. That. Was, Not. Fun.