Meals

1246

Replies

  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)
  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    The obese women study is irrelevant to a 19 y/o male such as the OP.

    I also provided other studies that included men.

  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

  • snickerscharlie
    snickerscharlie Posts: 8,582 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,534 Member
    edited December 2016
    Conclusion: dietary compliance is the greatest factor in reaching one's goals. The method of calorie reduction is completely irrelevant if the individual is unable/unwilling to follow the diet.

    ETA: Intermittent fasting is one method by which to reach said caloric deficit, so long as one watches their calorie consumption during their eating window. Can it work? Yes. Is it guaranteed to work? Of course not.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    That's not what I said <sigh> and you know it.

    I asked you how your studies apply to that 19 year old male. Can you please answer my question.
  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    And, I repeat. :)
  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    Instead of "opinion", please show a study that demonstrates your point. The studies I provided disqualifies your statement...ahem.."opinion".

  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Conclusion: dietary compliance is the greatest factor in reaching one's goals. The method of calorie reduction is completely irrelevant if the individual is unable/unwilling to follow the diet.

    ETA: Intermittent fasting is one method by which to reach said caloric deficit, so long as one watches their calorie consumption during their eating window. Can it work? Yes. Is it guaranteed to work? Of course not.

    Your conclusion (opinion) was disqualified in the studies I provided.
  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    Here's my publication on what a p-value of 0.4 means in this context.

    The difference between groups has no statistical significance.
    If the same people did the exact same study again with different subjects, there would be a very real chance that the IER group would NOT have higher weight loss.
    You using this statistically insignificant difference in ways as if it shows IF is better is not valid and assuming you know what p-values are about which you said you did, means you willfully misrepresent the things your links say.
    Conclusion: Your zealotry is showing.

    What????
    Is this a joke?

  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    And, I repeat. :)

    Your statement based on your opinion was disqualified in the studies I provided.
  • nutmegoreo
    nutmegoreo Posts: 15,534 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Conclusion: dietary compliance is the greatest factor in reaching one's goals. The method of calorie reduction is completely irrelevant if the individual is unable/unwilling to follow the diet.

    ETA: Intermittent fasting is one method by which to reach said caloric deficit, so long as one watches their calorie consumption during their eating window. Can it work? Yes. Is it guaranteed to work? Of course not.

    Your conclusion (opinion) was disqualified in the studies I provided.

    How so? Which study disqualified what I said?
  • snickerscharlie
    snickerscharlie Posts: 8,582 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    Instead of "opinion", please show a study that demonstrates your point. The studies I provided disqualifies your statement...ahem.."opinion".

    Please point out specifically where this is so? I'm just not seeing it.

    Let me put it another way:

    I've been using Intermittent Fasting (16:8) for almost 2 years now. Feel free to have a look at my profile page.

    In that time period, I lost 75 lbs, reached my goal weight and have been in maintenance since.

    Neither my metabolism nor I are deluded enough not to realize that had I chosen to do so, I could have easily doubled my calorie consumption within my daily 8-hour IF 'eating window,' and had that been the route I chose, I would likely be 75 lbs *over* my starting weight, instead.

    There is neither magic nor science in your mistaken belief that IF, in and of itself - without an appropriate caloric deficit being maintained through diet - has *any* direct bearing whatsoever on weight management.
  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    Instead of "opinion", please show a study that demonstrates your point. The studies I provided disqualifies your statement...ahem.."opinion".

    Please point out specifically where this is so? I'm just not seeing it.

    Let me put it another way:

    I've been using Intermittent Fasting (16:8) for almost 2 years now. Feel free to have a look at my profile page.

    In that time period, I lost 75 lbs, reached my goal weight and have been in maintenance since.

    Neither my metabolism nor I are deluded enough not to realize that had I chosen to do so, I could have easily doubled my calorie consumption within my daily 8-hour IF 'eating window,' and had that been the route I chose, I would likely be 75 lbs *over* my starting weight, instead.

    There is neither magic nor science in your mistaken belief that IF, in and of itself - without an appropriate caloric deficit being maintained through diet - has *any* direct bearing whatsoever on weight management.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    I'm not going to repeat the conclusion of the studies. Scroll up and re-read. Comparison of IF with others not doing it showed results that were favourable to IF. As in meal timing makes a difference. Simple.

  • SLLRunner
    SLLRunner Posts: 12,943 Member
    edited December 2016
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males," but did not provide weight, age, etc. How does that even apply here? In fact, the question was general with no details as to whether the OP is a "resistance-trained" male. All we know is he's 19 years old.
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    SLLRunner wrote: »
    The answer to your question is shown in the following study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27737674. This study demonstrates how "intermittent fasting", or IF, works.

    By limiting your "eating window" to a limited time span, you create a "fasting" period for the remainder of the day, which allows your body to go into efficient fat-burning.

    So, for example, in the study above, the "eating window" was within an 8-hr time period. This is also known as intermittent fasting.

    For me, it's a very effective strategy. I've noticed a huge difference if I eat within the established eating window. Also, note that there is also no reduction in food intake. Whatever food you were planning to eat that day is not reduced...just needs to be within the feeding window. I get such huge gains in weight loss for virtually little effort with intermittent fasting.

    So, yes. Meal timing is associated to weight loss effectiveness.

    I've done IF for years now but if I don't also regulate my calorie intake I gain weight. IF is not a weight loss plan in itself and you still have to be eating at the correct calorie deficit for your weight loss goals while doing it. What many people find though is that doing an eating window is a simple way to help keep calories in check. If I eat in the morning I tend to graze the rest of the day. But, when I break my fast at noon or later then I don't graze/snack and it's easier to hit my calorie targets.

    The effectiveness of intermittent fasting has to do with it's ability to improve insulin sensitivity and reboot metabolism. For example, this is shown in the following study, where those with deranged metabolisms demonstrated greater improvement of weight loss through intermittent fasting: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20921964

    Right. ;)

    Nope. Your metabolism does not need rebooting, and not everyone is insulin sensitive. Fasting is personal preference and works for some people, and not for others.

    That study you posted was done on "Thirty-four resistance-trained males." How does that even apply here?

    I posted two studies, one of men and the other women, as well as different metabolic performance levels. Demonstrates IF works along a spectrum of types.

    Nobody said it didn't work.

    It works for some people, not for everyone. And,it will only work as to weight loss if you're in a calorie deficit.

    You'll catch me intermittently fasting in a cold day in hell because that type of eating plan does not work for me when it comes to calorie control, which is the one necessary component to weight loss.

    Not sure why you responded with "nobody said it didn't work". All I did was respond to your previous concern, that one of the studies was done on resistance trained males. And all I said was I also provided another study on women with different metabolic type...demonstrating effectiveness of IF across various conditions. Your MFP profile says that your weight is creeping back. So, not sure what you mean by your strategy working for you. Just saying.

    Whoa. LOL! Feeling better about yourself now?

    To be exact, my profile says:
    I joined My Fitness Pal for support on this "getting healthier" journey. My highest weight was 220 when I was in my twenties, right after my mother passed away. When I was 40, I lost all the weight. However, weight started creeping back on over the last five years, 33 pounds to be exact, and I decided to get back on track.

    I have lost 44 pounds, been maintaining for a few years now, and I think I might be exactly where I need to be. I am n longer afraid of the bulk/cut process.
    I suppose for people who like to take digs, I should preface that first paragraph with a date. Right?

    Oh, I think you forgot to read the paragraph after that, which has been true for the last three years and is true today. ;);)

    So.....

    Your premise is that intermittent fasting works and you've posted studies which you believe back up your claim.

    I tell you nobody is saying that it DOES NOT work. What people, including me, are basically saying that (1) what works for one person may not work for another and (2) for any plan to work for weight loss you have to eat at a calorie deficit. In other words, if you are eating at a surplus on IF (or any other way of eating) you will not lose weight.

    Your studies do not apply to more than the smaller groups of people, such as those resistance training dudes. :)

    There were dudes in the obese women doing IF study I provided? Really? Where?

    That's not what I said, and you know it. ;)

    I am referring to your one male study as an example.

    So, tell me.....do you believe that intermittent fasting works for everyone? Is there some kind magic to it? Do tell. :)

    Magic? I highly doubt it.
    Scientific evidence with broad spectrum of types of subjects, however....indeed quite compelling.

    Based on the studies you provided, why do you think that IF would work for a 19 year old male? Why do you think those studies even apply to a 19 year old male who has provided no information at all?

    Not compelling at all.

    So, your conclusion is that intermittent fasting does not work for 19 year old males.

    You fail to grasp that intermittent fasting - in and of itself - has no direct bearing on weight loss, unless it helps the person remain in a caloric deficit. If this is the case it is the deficit that drives the reduction in body weight, not when the food was or wasn't consumed.

    And, I repeat. :)

    Your statement based on your opinion was disqualified in the studies I provided.

    What? What in the heck does that even mean?

    It's not an opinion that weight loss is dependent upon a calorie deficit no matter what type of eating plan one chooses, whether it be IF or grazing all day. Type of eating plan matters only to the extent that it works for the individual and gives them the desired results. That's been proven over and over.

    You throwing out studies that don't apply is what's disqualified.

  • fruttibiscotti
    fruttibiscotti Posts: 990 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Conclusion: dietary compliance is the greatest factor in reaching one's goals. The method of calorie reduction is completely irrelevant if the individual is unable/unwilling to follow the diet.

    ETA: Intermittent fasting is one method by which to reach said caloric deficit, so long as one watches their calorie consumption during their eating window. Can it work? Yes. Is it guaranteed to work? Of course not.

    Your conclusion (opinion) was disqualified in the studies I provided.

    How so? Which study disqualified what I said?

    Scroll up and read the conclusion comparison IF to other subjects. Meal timing made a difference.