measuring

what foods do i measure with spoons like 1 tsp and what foods to i weigh? when it comes to scoopers like peanut butter, jelly or hummus i always spoon them.
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Replies

  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Weigh everything.
  • humpbackgirl
    humpbackgirl Posts: 66 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
  • Troutsy
    Troutsy Posts: 275 Member
    Weigh everything.

    This. Weighing is more accurate than using cups/teaspoons. And yes liquids too. I was surprised when I weighed out jelly for the first time, but it still is a decent portion size.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    edited January 2017
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them. Make it really accurate by putting the jar/container on the scale, taring it, then take out what weight you want - whatever is on the spoon or knife is yours!

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
  • Troutsy
    Troutsy Posts: 275 Member
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,213 Member
    Weigh everything.

    This!
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,213 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)

    Place your piece of bread on the scale and make a note of its weight ... put your jelly on it. Observe the weight change. Record the weight of both the bread and the jelly.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)

    Place your piece of bread on the scale and make a note of its weight ... put your jelly on it. Observe the weight change. Record the weight of both the bread and the jelly.

    What do you do with the bit on the knife/spoon?
  • CurlyCockney
    CurlyCockney Posts: 1,394 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)

    Place your piece of bread on the scale and make a note of its weight ... put your jelly on it. Observe the weight change. Record the weight of both the bread and the jelly.

    This. Or, if you are a compulsory spoon-licker like me, put the jar on the scale and tare/zero it. Remove what you want, and weigh the jar again. The negative number is the amount you've removed (whether it reached your bread or got eaten off the spoon).
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 22,213 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)

    Place your piece of bread on the scale and make a note of its weight ... put your jelly on it. Observe the weight change. Record the weight of both the bread and the jelly.

    What do you do with the bit on the knife/spoon?

    I wipe it off on the bread.

    I only start with a little bit and keep adding dabs until I reach the amount I want.
  • livingleanlivingclean
    livingleanlivingclean Posts: 11,755 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).

    I think weighing liquids is unnecessary - you can't overfill a spoon or cup with liquid like you can with solids, it fills the space completely so isn't inaccurate like solids - there'll be little variance from one measure to another
  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).

    I think weighing liquids is unnecessary - you can't overfill a spoon or cup with liquid like you can with solids, it fills the space completely so isn't inaccurate like solids - there'll be little variance from one measure to another

    I'd need to look to find it, but there is a video out there showing the opposite and that there can be more than a difference between cups.
  • callsitlikeiseeit
    callsitlikeiseeit Posts: 8,633 Member
    solids are weighed on a scale. learn how to use it.
    liquids are measured in measuring cups or spoons.
  • Troutsy
    Troutsy Posts: 275 Member
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).

    I think weighing liquids is unnecessary - you can't overfill a spoon or cup with liquid like you can with solids, it fills the space completely so isn't inaccurate like solids - there'll be little variance from one measure to another

    I'd need to look to find it, but there is a video out there showing the opposite and that there can be more than a difference between cups.

    I posted one earlier up thread if it's the same on you're thinking of
  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    Awolturtle wrote: »
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).

    I think weighing liquids is unnecessary - you can't overfill a spoon or cup with liquid like you can with solids, it fills the space completely so isn't inaccurate like solids - there'll be little variance from one measure to another

    I'd need to look to find it, but there is a video out there showing the opposite and that there can be more than a difference between cups.

    I posted one earlier up thread if it's the same on you're thinking of

    Not that one. Someone was comparing the volume of different cups and showing a much bigger difference then I expected.
  • Troutsy
    Troutsy Posts: 275 Member
    Awolturtle wrote: »
    even liquids? (it also just seems so weird to weigh jelly lol)
    Jelly isn't liquid - but anyway, weigh it - you'll soon get used to it.
    Jelly/peanut butter/hummus/butter etc aren't liquids... Weigh them.

    Oils, milk, juice etc can be measured in spoons/cups
    But they can (and I think they should) be weighed. Just find an entry that has values for weight. 1 ml = 1 gram is accurate only for water (and a few other substances; often accurate enough for this purpose, but not correct).

    I think weighing liquids is unnecessary - you can't overfill a spoon or cup with liquid like you can with solids, it fills the space completely so isn't inaccurate like solids - there'll be little variance from one measure to another

    I'd need to look to find it, but there is a video out there showing the opposite and that there can be more than a difference between cups.

    I posted one earlier up thread if it's the same on you're thinking of

    Not that one. Someone was comparing the volume of different cups and showing a much bigger difference then I expected.

    Ah, I haven't seen that one yet.
  • kimny72
    kimny72 Posts: 16,027 Member
    OP, the in between stuff like PB, jelly, hummus, sour cream, butter, etc all goes on the scale. Put the container on the scale, tare it to zero, and then scoop until the negative number is the serving size you want.

    I don't have a scale that weighs in ml so I don't weigh liquids, like oil, salad dressing, and milk. To be safe I round those up and don't use much in the first place. It would be more accurate to weigh them, but you have to pick your battles! If I used them more often, I would get a new scale that had ml.
  • zyxst
    zyxst Posts: 9,131 Member
    I use measuring spoons for liquids and weigh most everything else. I do weigh my liquids so I know how much 1 tsp or 1 T weighs and I don't have to dirty up more dishes. I managed to find a Pyrex liquid measuring cup that's marked for mL (tsp, T, and ounces) that measures as low as 5 mL. It's a PITA to wash because it's a shot glass. :tongue:
  • MelanieCN77
    MelanieCN77 Posts: 4,053 Member
    I use cups and teaspoons as well as my scale, basically whichever is easiest. Until I have a problem stalling on weight loss I'm not going to get finicky about it, and It will probably become more important as I get closer to goal weight.