Whole30 diet

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Replies

  • capellof
    capellof Posts: 6 Member
    I'm on day nine and feeling lighter and more alert. I have terrible sugar cravings in the afternoon, but I have been able to handle them with a couple of almonds and half of a banana. I don't know, call me crazy, but it is easier to have a list of "what not to eat." and choose from a long list of meat (organic of course), veggies and fruits.
    Anyhow, wish me luck!
  • jelleigh
    jelleigh Posts: 726 Member
    Let us know what you learn at the end of the month! Good luck !
  • slyce0flife
    slyce0flife Posts: 19 Member
    Good for you guys!

    I'm only asking thought provoking questions.
    What happens after 30?
    What happens if you eliminate something that isn't necessary?
    Why not use something backed by science if using elimination diets?

    After 30 you slowly reintroduce the things you want to have,

    or alternative 2:

    11547911.jpg

    I have never met nor heard about a real life alternative 1 person.

    There are plenty of people that complete Whole30 and and go crazy. My husband and I haven't. We have both been trying out dairy and grains, we had a beer one night. Whole30 for me was about changing my relationship with food. I don't crave anything anymore and it is the first time in my life I can say that! It isn't like I am never going to have ice cream again. I just don't want to make it a part of my regular diet, because it is definitely a trigger food that does make me want to eat all the things.
  • GYATagain
    GYATagain Posts: 141 Member
    Good luck to you! You will feel amazing!! Pay close attention to how your body reacts when reintroducing any foods and you will be astounded by finding out that either somethings you thought made you feel bad, don't; and also finding out things you didn't even think about make you feel like pooh. I concur wholeheartedly to why not do the Whole30? Doing without all the "off limits" foods/drink for 30 days is certainly not going to hurt you! And something like this really gets you to "listen" to your body.
  • Hello_its_Dan
    Hello_its_Dan Posts: 406 Member
    Good for you guys!

    I'm only asking thought provoking questions.
    What happens after 30?
    What happens if you eliminate something that isn't necessary?
    Why not use something backed by science if using elimination diets?

    After 30 you slowly reintroduce the things you want to have,

    or alternative 2:

    11547911.jpg

    I have never met nor heard about a real life alternative 1 person.

    There are plenty of people that complete Whole30 and and go crazy. My husband and I haven't. We have both been trying out dairy and grains, we had a beer one night. Whole30 for me was about changing my relationship with food. I don't crave anything anymore and it is the first time in my life I can say that! It isn't like I am never going to have ice cream again. I just don't want to make it a part of my regular diet, because it is definitely a trigger food that does make me want to eat all the things.

    That's good.
    A few of the people I work with are recovering EDs where Whole30 created a massive binge/purge cycle.
    Had to break them of the "good/bad" "forbidden/allowed" mentality too.
  • slyce0flife
    slyce0flife Posts: 19 Member
    Good for you guys!

    I'm only asking thought provoking questions.
    What happens after 30?
    What happens if you eliminate something that isn't necessary?
    Why not use something backed by science if using elimination diets?

    After 30 you slowly reintroduce the things you want to have,

    or alternative 2:

    11547911.jpg

    I have never met nor heard about a real life alternative 1 person.

    There are plenty of people that complete Whole30 and and go crazy. My husband and I haven't. We have both been trying out dairy and grains, we had a beer one night. Whole30 for me was about changing my relationship with food. I don't crave anything anymore and it is the first time in my life I can say that! It isn't like I am never going to have ice cream again. I just don't want to make it a part of my regular diet, because it is definitely a trigger food that does make me want to eat all the things.

    That's good.
    A few of the people I work with are recovering EDs where Whole30 created a massive binge/purge cycle.
    Had to break them of the "good/bad" "forbidden/allowed" mentality too.

    Wow, that's scary! Luckily, neither of us have had an ED. I feel for people that have to deal with it, as I can definitely see how it can happen in today's society. We're all force fed into believing women and men should look a certain way. It is hard not being able to live up to the ridiculous standards.

    People (friends, coworkers) tell me I am off for even doing Whole30 to begin with, but I truly feel better than I ever have. I don't use food as a reward like I used to. When I'm in social situations at restaurants I now have the wherewithal to pass on something I know is going to make me feel bad later or to stop eating when I'm full instead of eating until I can barely button my pants. :p
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,972 Member
    capellof wrote: »
    Well, I was diagnosed with a lymphatic sickness and I need to boost my inmune system. I don't want to go vegan, I love meat.
    capellof wrote: »
    Follicular Lymphoma B cell :(

    This is a matter I would discuss with my oncologist, or ask him/her to refer me to a dietitian familiar with the needs of cancer patients.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    capellof wrote: »
    Well, I was diagnosed with a lymphatic sickness and I need to boost my inmune system. I don't want to go vegan, I love meat.

    I would suggest that you should be having this conversation with the physician that diagnosed you rather than a bunch of internet junkies who know nothing of your medical history or dietary needs. Maybe ask for a dietetic referral.
  • gillesse
    gillesse Posts: 66 Member
    edited February 2017
    I started it 11 days ago. It was incredibly hard in the beginning but it's been a little easier lately. I don't feel as bloated as I used to, and I feel a little happier than I used to for some reason. I don't feel as sad and depressed as I used to. I plan to do this for more than 30 days- till the end of march. Then I will start reintroducing other foods into my diet again. But so far, so good :)
  • Afura
    Afura Posts: 2,054 Member
    edited February 2017
    Two friends and I tried it. One friend was able to finish, the other fell off the bandwagon halfway through going to the 'forbidden foods'. I think I fell off after 4 or 5 days. I can't help it, I love cheese. Anywhoo, it is definitely great as a food intolerance test if you go long enough with it. One friend found out that she's gluten intolerant (she was tested afterwards, and is not celiac, but has reactions when eating wheat), the other found that him and milk do not get along.
    I was just a failure. But I still had cheese.

    The program itself does start to reintroduce foods back after the initial phases to see how your body adjusts, and it IS built for just 30 days, though it seems a popular jumping off point for paleo. If restricting those items is sustainable for you, fair enough and best of luck. :smile:
  • Alatariel75
    Alatariel75 Posts: 17,945 Member
    Afura wrote: »
    Two friends and I tried it. One friend was able to finish, the other fell off the bandwagon halfway through going to the 'forbidden foods'. I think I fell off after 4 or 5 days. I can't help it, I love cheese. Anywhoo, it is definitely great as a food intolerance test if you go long enough with it. One friend found out that she's gluten intolerant (she was tested afterwards, and is not celiac, but has reactions when eating wheat), the other found that him and milk do not get along.
    I was just a failure. But I still had cheese.

    The program itself does start to reintroduce foods back after the initial phases to see how your body adjusts, and it IS built for just 30 days, though it seems a popular jumping off point for paleo. If restricting those items is sustainable for you, fair enough and best of luck. :smile:

    And that makes you, my friend, the true winner. <3 cheese
  • jelleigh
    jelleigh Posts: 726 Member
    Good for you guys!

    I'm only asking thought provoking questions.
    What happens after 30?
    What happens if you eliminate something that isn't necessary?
    Why not use something backed by science if using elimination diets?

    After 30 you slowly reintroduce the things you want to have,

    or alternative 2:

    11547911.jpg

    I have never met nor heard about a real life alternative 1 person.

    There are plenty of people that complete Whole30 and and go crazy. My husband and I haven't. We have both been trying out dairy and grains, we had a beer one night. Whole30 for me was about changing my relationship with food. I don't crave anything anymore and it is the first time in my life I can say that! It isn't like I am never going to have ice cream again. I just don't want to make it a part of my regular diet, because it is definitely a trigger food that does make me want to eat all the things.

    That's good.
    A few of the people I work with are recovering EDs where Whole30 created a massive binge/purge cycle.
    Had to break them of the "good/bad" "forbidden/allowed" mentality too.

    Wow, that's scary! Luckily, neither of us have had an ED. I feel for people that have to deal with it, as I can definitely see how it can happen in today's society. We're all force fed into believing women and men should look a certain way. It is hard not being able to live up to the ridiculous standards.

    People (friends, coworkers) tell me I am off for even doing Whole30 to begin with, but I truly feel better than I ever have. I don't use food as a reward like I used to. When I'm in social situations at restaurants I now have the wherewithal to pass on something I know is going to make me feel bad later or to stop eating when I'm full instead of eating until I can barely button my pants. :p

    I found the same thing. It really helped me with my relationship with food and not using as a reward. And although there are foods you don't eat for 30 days, I don't feel like the program teaches you to view them as "bad" or "evil" but rather to understand how they affect you and choose when and how much you eat of them mindfully. I think it taught me balance and how to making conscious decisions about my health. Plus it taught me not to be afraid of healthy fat. I now have avocado and coconut oil in my diet and I also never buy mayo anymore now that I know to just make it with no chemicals or preservatives. Just as yummy and feels so much healthier!
  • slyce0flife
    slyce0flife Posts: 19 Member
    jelleigh wrote: »
    Good for you guys!

    I'm only asking thought provoking questions.
    What happens after 30?
    What happens if you eliminate something that isn't necessary?
    Why not use something backed by science if using elimination diets?

    After 30 you slowly reintroduce the things you want to have,

    or alternative 2:

    11547911.jpg

    I have never met nor heard about a real life alternative 1 person.

    There are plenty of people that complete Whole30 and and go crazy. My husband and I haven't. We have both been trying out dairy and grains, we had a beer one night. Whole30 for me was about changing my relationship with food. I don't crave anything anymore and it is the first time in my life I can say that! It isn't like I am never going to have ice cream again. I just don't want to make it a part of my regular diet, because it is definitely a trigger food that does make me want to eat all the things.

    That's good.
    A few of the people I work with are recovering EDs where Whole30 created a massive binge/purge cycle.
    Had to break them of the "good/bad" "forbidden/allowed" mentality too.

    Wow, that's scary! Luckily, neither of us have had an ED. I feel for people that have to deal with it, as I can definitely see how it can happen in today's society. We're all force fed into believing women and men should look a certain way. It is hard not being able to live up to the ridiculous standards.

    People (friends, coworkers) tell me I am off for even doing Whole30 to begin with, but I truly feel better than I ever have. I don't use food as a reward like I used to. When I'm in social situations at restaurants I now have the wherewithal to pass on something I know is going to make me feel bad later or to stop eating when I'm full instead of eating until I can barely button my pants. :p

    I found the same thing. It really helped me with my relationship with food and not using as a reward. And although there are foods you don't eat for 30 days, I don't feel like the program teaches you to view them as "bad" or "evil" but rather to understand how they affect you and choose when and how much you eat of them mindfully. I think it taught me balance and how to making conscious decisions about my health. Plus it taught me not to be afraid of healthy fat. I now have avocado and coconut oil in my diet and I also never buy mayo anymore now that I know to just make it with no chemicals or preservatives. Just as yummy and feels so much healthier!

    I went through a similar process but without the Whole 30, at the time I joined MFP. I admit that I read up on Paleo and "Just Eat Real Food" and "clean food", but I decided to go for the principles that I found meaningful and dump the rest. For instance, I played with the idea of stopping eating sweets for good, and never touching added sugar again, and avoid "processed food" and "chemicals". I felt I could - I can cook, and I don't need sweets - but at the same time, it felt sad and like a big jump. And then I started to think about all the "inbetween" foods: Fruit flavored yogurt, pasta sauces, waffles? Never again? What about frozen berries, I can't eat them without sugar. This is going to be miserable and restrictive. And what the kitten is processed food? Does it mean I can't eat my beloved liver paté? No, that's not a route I'll be taking. So (I didn't know then that it was what I did, but it was) I thought about what I wanted to achieve, and what I needed to do to achieve it, and decided to not worry about unnecessary things.

    What happened, was magic.

    The fear of fat, sugar and salt went away. I started eating butter and not cut off fat from meat. I even learnt to love mayo! I eat a lot more variety, and love it all. I have a craving for vegetables. I love to cook, because I make meals I want to eat. I also love food. I feel full and satisfied in a totally different way now, because I eat much better and don't worry. Maintaining a healthy weight is effortless. I still have cravings for sweets, but they are manageable; when I do give in, I eat sensible amounts and I don't feel bad afterwards.

    All of this!! I'm not going to live on Whole30 forever, but it legitimately taught me how to handle food in every day situations. I don't have to have a sweet after dinner and I don't have to drink when I am with my friends. I can have cheese, although I know how it makes my stomach feel after I eat it. Therefore I can make the cognitive choice whether feeling that way later is worth eating it. I'm still going to have chicken and waffles, because... reasons.

    I am incredibly blown away by the changes in my body composition since the beginning of the year. I'm not worried about being "skinny" I am more concerned about increasing my strength and stamina. You can't really function on crap food, so diet is really where it's at to get your body running efficiently.
  • jelleigh
    jelleigh Posts: 726 Member
    Exactly! I read so many posts on MFP of people who have such unhealthy relationships with food, and with the scale, and the advicw they are given is mostly about CICO. And of course that will help them lose weight but I don't think it helps the underlying issue of why they may have gained in the first place. In fact, I think it's better to learn WHY we crave certain food at certain times and what triggers us, before focusing on the basics of how many calories it is. I wish I could recommend that everyone (well especially people with unhealthy relationships with food which is probably most of us - that's why we ended up needing to lose weight!) try Whole 30 once . Then, take all those learning, all that appreciation for healthy whole food, all that understanding of how certain foods affects you, the healthier relationship with the scale etc , and use it to assist with a sustainable CICO lifestyle. I credit CICO for weight loss, but I credit a healthier relationship with food and the scale to Whole 30. And I don't think I could personally have been as successful had I not had both aspects.