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Anyone following a Whole Foods Plant Based diet?

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  • crzycatlady1crzycatlady1 Member Posts: 1,930 Member Member Posts: 1,930 Member
    amyereed99 wrote: »
    So all in all, I do want to know where my calories are falling, but I'm not greatly concerned with macro counting.

    I've lost around 50lbs and have been successfuly in maintenance for around 4 years now and I've never tracked/cared about macros. The only number I keep an eye on is my calorie intake. Keeping things simple works best for me :)
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    amyereed99 wrote: »
    I'm just gonna throw this out there....

    I have been professionally diagnosed as having ADD. Not counting and worrying about calorie tracking has been the most important thing for my past and current successes. When I track I am good for only so long, about 2-3 weeks, before I grow complacent with it and distracted and then comes the guilt, anxiety, and feelings of failure because I have stopped tracking.

    If counting longterm doesn't work for you, don't count longterm. I don't see what this has to do with this thread, where OP started by saying that she had successfully counted in the past but now wanted to try a different way of eating (she did not express unhappiness with counting) and where counting to make sure calories and nutrition are on track need not mean longterm counting.

    I think it's entirely possible to lose weight through other ways of tracking/being mindful besides counting, but I'm not sure how that's responsive to OP's question.
    In my example it is a mental health choice not to overstimulate and obsess which works.

    And that's great, but that's different from what I was talking about, which was telling other people that they should not count or acting as if some other method (looking at calorie density of food) was somehow far preferable to counting for someone who was already counting when in fact it seems just as fussy and burdensome or more so, and also not necessary at all.
    In regards to 80/10/10 ratios being protein deficient, I'll give this example....breastfed newborn babies, in their first year of life, grow over 300%. That's 300% body, muscle and weight growth on just 6-7% protein. Protein needs are far less than what is being pushed by the Dairy and Meat industries.

    If this is supposed to be responsive to me, you apparently didn't actually read what I said. I said 10% protein AT A DEFICIT is too low. Babies, along with all the other differences, are not at a deficit -- they are eating to gain weight. (I also think 80-10-10 is fine for someone maintaining and reasonably active, since I think total grams are what matter. I also think you need a bit more protein if on a 100% plant based diet because you need a bit of a margin of error, also not applicable for a baby who is breast fed.)

    I'd be more concerned on a raw diet, since it's harder to get in good sources of protein (like legumes) on raw. No way I'd personally switch to raw without tracking for a while, but then I'd never do raw as I think it's too hard to eat healthfully on it and don't see the point. Food being too savory seems like a problematic thing to be worrying about. (I might try WFPB at some point, and have done similar ways of eating for periods of time.)
    edited March 2017
  • stealthqstealthq Member Posts: 4,307 Member Member Posts: 4,307 Member
    amyereed99 wrote: »
    I'm just gonna throw this out there....

    I have been professionally diagnosed as having ADD. Not counting and worrying about calorie tracking has been the most important thing for my past and current successes. When I track I am good for only so long, about 2-3 weeks, before I grow complacent with it and distracted and then comes the guilt, anxiety, and feelings of failure because I have stopped tracking.

    In my example it is a mental health choice not to overstimulate and obsess which works.

    In regards to 80/10/10 ratios being protein deficient, I'll give this example....breastfed newborn babies, in their first year of life, grow over 300%. That's 300% body, muscle and weight growth on just 6-7% protein. Protein needs are far less than what is being pushed by the Dairy and Meat industries.

    Breast milk is 17% protein according to 'Constituents of human milk', United Nations University Centre (archive.unu.edu/unupress/food/8F174e/8F174E04.htm). Be sure to calculate % protein per total calories, NOT % protein per volume or you are including water in the total. % carb + % protein + % fat should equal 100%.

    In a surplus, protein is not nearly as important. In a deficit, protein is important in adults to maintain muscle mass. There are several studies that show this.
  • pomegranatecloudpomegranatecloud Member Posts: 812 Member Member Posts: 812 Member
    I don't track. I find it's easy to stick to reasonable portions and lose or maintain my weight rather than spending time obsessing about my calories and macros.
  • CharlieBeansmomTraceyCharlieBeansmomTracey Member Posts: 7,702 Member Member Posts: 7,702 Member
    I have eaten a vegan diet for nearly 10 years with tremendous improvements to my health. However, although I lost about 20 lbs, I didn't always eat clean. I had been thinking of going 100% Whole Foods Plant Based for some time. I am educated enough at this point to see the wisdom of it. I made the move in February. WOW! The most important thing that happened was that my food cravings disappeared. Now I restrict calories to my optimal range easily and I have been steadily losing weight since. I no longer have any doubt what-so-ever as to whether I will hit my goal and achieve it. It is simply a matter of patience. Of course, the other health benefits are undeniable. I expect, over time, this will become the most common way of eating for everyone. It will just take time for word to get around. The evidence is undeniable.

    nope not everyone will do a plant based diet over time,so I dont think it will become the most common way of eating. I know I wont, my health improved eating the way I always have just less of it,losing weight helped some too. my health markers improved too. there are many here who cant have a lot of plant based foods due to the fiber. clean eating also has nothing to do with weight loss it comes down to a deficit of calories. if eating that way works for you then that is great,whatever works for you and is sustainable long term.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    I've played around with plant based and eat that way most of the time (been doing so 100% during Lent, was doing so about 5 days a week before), and I do crave meat when not eating it -- I'm good having it only a couple days a week, but not eating it at all has not made me not want it, especially when I smell it cooking.

    I think if I felt an ethical commitment to not eating it it would be different, but so far I only feel an ethical desire to make certain decisions about sourcing and to have it more rarely. But I'll see how I feel after a bit more time.

    I don't find it easier to control my weight without meat or eggs or dairy (I'm mostly a whole foods person, meat or no).
  • JRSINAZJRSINAZ Member Posts: 159 Member Member Posts: 159 Member
    I am WFPB and my diary is open to friends
  • slossiaslossia Member Posts: 138 Member Member Posts: 138 Member
    I’ve been vegan for 45 years, and only gained weight once when I started to drink beer, since I’ve quit drinking about 10 years ago, I’ve never had a weight problem. I do track my macros and keep my fat very low, which probably helped me keep my calories down. I’m never hungry cause I eat till satiety. Lots of fiber. I hear nothing but complaining by family and friends who are always dieting to loose weight only to gain it back and always hungry. So I’m a believer in a plant based vegan diet because it works for me! But I always tell someone to try it for 30 days to see if it works for them. My only suggestion is if you do try it to keep your fat under 15 percent. Your protein at 1/2 gram per pound of weight and get at least 50 grams of fiber a day. I get about 60 myself.
  • chancie72chancie72 Member Posts: 270 Member Member Posts: 270 Member
    I have been WFPB since last summer. An absolute game changer for me. But I do still have to keep track of my calories or I will go over lots of days. I have found nice recipes for "healthy" desserts but many of these contain nuts or nut butters etc which can add up in calories very easily lol! plus smoothies can get quite high in calories, even oatmeal can. I do overnight oats and by time you do your add ins (fruits, milk, nuts, nutter butters, cacao, chia etc) it can easily get 1 serving of oatmeal up to 400 + calories! :)
  • deannalfisherdeannalfisher Member, Premium Posts: 5,601 Member Member, Premium Posts: 5,601 Member
    I'm vegetarian, most of my diet is vegan. I gained weight as a veggie and now I'm losing. You have to track everything, doesn't mater what your diet is. Pay attention especially to nuts and fruits, they are quite calorie dense.

    Whole fruits are low in calorie density. Only 200-400 calories per pound compared to nuts which are 2,600 calories per pound.

    Please check your facts before you post misinformation because people will use that information and end up nutrient deficient. Fruit is essential for good health.

    huh....my single 4oz banana is over 100cal - i can easily eat 2-3 of those in a day; not including other fruit - so not fruit isn't really low in calorie density...it also isn't essential for good health - you get a lot of micronutrients from it, but you can get those from other food and vitamin sources
  • gvizzle74gvizzle74 Member, Premium Posts: 121 Member Member, Premium Posts: 121 Member
    if you are eating whole plant based food you don't need to track.


    That's like saying if you're wearing a seatbelt you don't need to worry about speeding. I've met a lot of fat vegans. If you're willing to track - track.

    edited March 2018
  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 25,883 Member Member Posts: 25,883 Member
    gvizzle74 wrote: »
    if you are eating whole plant based food you don't need to track.


    That's like saying if you're wearing a seatbelt you don't need to worry about speeding. I've met a lot of fat vegans. If you're willing to track - track.

    I don't agree with the statement that those who are doing WFPB don't need to track (there are plenty of calorie dense foods available to people eating WFPB), but many who are doing WFPB distinguish it from veganism and maintain that any vegans who are overweight are simply doing it wrong and need to switch to a WFPB diet.

  • CharlieBeansmomTraceyCharlieBeansmomTracey Member Posts: 7,702 Member Member Posts: 7,702 Member
    I count calories because I am trying to lose weight. I eat plant based because it is the only ethical and by far the most healthy option available.

    for you its the only ethical and healthy option available. its not for everyone.
  • ChunkahlunkahChunkahlunkah Member Posts: 373 Member Member Posts: 373 Member
    For me, being "calorie aware" (rather than closely tracking) is enough to lose when I'm eating primarily a whole foods diet and also getting in about 3-4 hours of moderate exercise a week.

  • nowine4menowine4me Member, Premium Posts: 3,986 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,986 Member
    I switched from vegetarian to WFPB in January. I still track and log in maintenance. If I follow the “Daily Dozen”, it typically puts me at about 2,000 cals, which is perfect. I’m closer to 60% carbs following it by the book.
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