My roommate eats like a garbage disposal!

So I'm just recently back to MFP after a long hiatus in which I gained back all the weight I'd previously lost.
I'm not unfamiliar with the whole weight loss game, and I know pretty well how to eat, etc. It's just that I haven't.
But anyway- part of my issue now is my roommate eats TRASH. Like, it's bad. Junk food 24/7. And it's just so hard having all that food in the house! Not only that, but I've only just realized that probably 60% of the stuff we do together involves food in some way. And yep, you guessed it- it's junk food.
I can buy all healthy food, and not purchase crappy snacks, etc etc, but I really struggle with her food in the house and the eating patterns she and I have established in our friendship.
Also, yes, it is HER food. But we've always had a relatively loose definition of whose food is whose- unless it's something specific you bought for a recipe, or a specific snack, it's more "household" food.
HELP! Any suggestions, comments, critique, advice, etc is welcome. Except "move out." I can't afford to, also that seems kinda drastic.

also if you wanna be friends, you should add me :smile:
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Replies

  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    edited May 2017
    You could create simple rules for yourself, like having junk food only when you're doing stuff together, the more important stuff, not the random daily hangouts. For your typical daily meals buy more calorie appropriate foods and stay away from the junk at least 60 or 70% of the time (that's what works for me, your mileage may vary) unless eating an appropriate serving of it doesn't leave you hungry (I'm like that with pizza, I'm more than happy and not hungry after 2 slices). It's easier said than done, I know, but you need to learn to work with what you've got if not having junk food around is not an option.
  • strangethingsdone
    strangethingsdone Posts: 22 Member
    Focus on you, not your room mate. What she does is none of your business. You want to be successful, get yourself in the right mindset and learn to manage how to cope when your are around junk food.

    Um, yes. That's precisely what I'm asking for tips/advice on.
  • JoJosAnatomymfp
    JoJosAnatomymfp Posts: 178 Member
    Only you know what works for you. You said you did it before so get yourself back to what you were doing then that helped you.

    The reason I said focus on you is because your post focuses on everything your room mate does that's bad. Never mind what she does. She's not your focus. Good luck to you anyways
  • strangethingsdone
    strangethingsdone Posts: 22 Member
    Only you know what works for you. You said you did it before so get yourself back to what you were doing then that helped you.

    The reason I said focus on you is because your post focuses on everything your room mate does that's bad. Never mind what she does. She's not your focus. Good luck to you anyways


    Mm, that's fair. I guess I feel like when I'm not in the house I don't have as much of an issue not eating the junk, but when I'm at home I struggle. I guess it's the combination of the food being available, and not being as occupied with whatever it is I'm doing. And before, when I was successful, I lived alone. So it's an adjustment.
  • snowflake954
    snowflake954 Posts: 7,513 Member
    Look at the bright side--she won't touch your food. Just buy and eat your own stuff. If you feel that she's sabotaging by tempting you to eat high calorie food, well then, that's a different problem. Just sit down and tell her things are changing, that your doctor put you on a diet and you'll be eating differently from now on. Allow yourself to eat the other stuff once and a while and make it fit your calorie goals. If she's a good friend, she'll understand and support you.
  • Chef_Barbell
    Chef_Barbell Posts: 6,524 Member
    Do you. Worrying about what others do will not lead to success.
  • glassofroses
    glassofroses Posts: 653 Member
    If what you do together is food then gear the places/foods you eat to the healthier options. Either she'll get with the programme or you'll have to, for the sake of both of you, find new ways to hang out away from food. If she isn't willing to make any concessions, why should you? I know that sounds rough but why should one person give and give all the time only to get nothing back. It doesn't seem like a fair friendship.

    Like everyone says, focus on you, you can't be on this journey and worry about someone else too. It's too much. :heart:
  • __TMac__
    __TMac__ Posts: 1,665 Member
    I don't get the sense she wants to change her roommate. She's asking for tips on maintaining her control in a house full of tempting foods.

    I would have a hard time with this as well. Can you designate specific cupboards for your food, so you don't have to see her packages?
  • glassofroses
    glassofroses Posts: 653 Member
    TmacMMM wrote: »
    I don't get the sense she wants to change her roommate. She's asking for tips on maintaining her control in a house full of tempting foods.

    I would have a hard time with this as well. Can you designate specific cupboards for your food, so you don't have to see her packages?

    I see what you mean, but when it comes to control, like motivation, it's self driven. You can have separate cupboards but if you don't have the ability to say no to going into the other cupboard, then nothing we can say will change that. The will has to be stronger than the want. I'm not sure what advice can be given for that. Take a walk when you get the urge for bad foods?
  • pamfgil
    pamfgil Posts: 449 Member
    If you can't separate out the junk food to specific cupboards, maybe some kind of opaque containers for storage. If you can come up with some kind of hobby to keep your hands busy while you hang out it makes it easier to not eat. Also if you clean your teeth it makes anything sweet taste foul, so you can put off eating for at least 30 min until the effect wears off.
  • crakmasta
    crakmasta Posts: 16 Member
    I face the same situation at home. Between my wife and kids it's carb heaven. My best course to aid me in resisting has been drinking a lot of water and tea when I'm home. Many times, for me anyway, when I get the munchies, I'm just thirsty.
  • __TMac__
    __TMac__ Posts: 1,665 Member
    I'd also try pre-logging as much as possible. If the decision about what you're going to eat has already been made for the day, it's easier to get through it without going off the rails. Every night before bed, I check my calendar and log what I'm planning on eating the next day. (If I'm eating out, I'll choose the restaurant and check the menu.) Then all I have to do in the kitchen is make a bee-line for that specific food, weigh it out, and then leave. No need to stand there staring at the unplanned cookies. :)

    Another trick is to plan a reasonable treat each day that you really like. Then you can pass on the morning donut because you're looking forward to your evening chocolate.

    Good luck!
  • Kimo159
    Kimo159 Posts: 508 Member
    Here's a few options:
    • No more shared food in the house. She has hers and you have yours. This will make you less tempted to eat her food. I have a room mate and that's how we work it.
    • Stay busy, especially in the beginning. If you spend a lot of time outside of the house, you won't be in the house and get bored and eat foods that put you over your deficit. If you feel a craving, go for a walk, go to the library, go to the mall, whatever you want to do just go do something. (That helps me at least).
    • Come up with new activities that the two of you to do together that doesn't involve eating (or at least mostly doesn't). Ask her for her help and support as much as possible. Let her know that what she eats is her business and you aren't trying to tell her what to eat/not to eat but she might be willing to bend a bit to help you out.
    • When you feel like you're having a moment of weakness, maybe look at some photos of yourself. Take progress photos so when you start to have those moments you can see how far you've come.
    • Buy yourself some new snacks to eat while you're hanging out with her. Something low cal and high volume. Popcorn (as long as it's not loaded with butter), cut up some veggies, whatever works for your taste preference really.
    • Pre portioned amounts of calorie dense foods can be helpful for some people as well. That way you can have the foods you crave without blowing your deficit.
    • Try to minimize calories as much as possible outside of when you eat the more calorie dense food with her/at the house. Eat a lot of fruits, veggies, leans proteins. That way you'll have gotten in a lot of nutrients and left calories for more calorie dense/nutrient deficient food.

    Good luck on the weight loss journey!
  • ShrinkingViolet1982
    ShrinkingViolet1982 Posts: 919 Member
    Only you know what works for you. You said you did it before so get yourself back to what you were doing then that helped you.

    The reason I said focus on you is because your post focuses on everything your room mate does that's bad. Never mind what she does. She's not your focus. Good luck to you anyways


    Mm, that's fair. I guess I feel like when I'm not in the house I don't have as much of an issue not eating the junk, but when I'm at home I struggle. I guess it's the combination of the food being available, and not being as occupied with whatever it is I'm doing. And before, when I was successful, I lived alone. So it's an adjustment.

    You could ask for a change to how the household stuff is stored. You could ask politely (and explain why you're having trouble) for her to keep the "bad" food in her room instead of in the common area. Not stuff you would make for dinner, etc, or that needs to be refrigerated, but like Twizzlers and chips do not have to be commonly stored.
  • SoDamnHungry
    SoDamnHungry Posts: 6,999 Member
    Ninja kick the cookies off the table whenever you see them! Then she'll have to install a rule that you're not allowed to touch her food. Problem solved?
  • NewMeSM75
    NewMeSM75 Posts: 973 Member
    edited May 2017
    I don't have a room mate who eats junk food but I do have children who eats ice cream and such. Yes, I buy it for them but I also buy individual cups so that I can enjoy it also. I just allow myself to eat so much and then move on. There is always temptation. You have to either have the discipline to eat some or none. Remember what you're doing it for.

    One of my favorite treats are the 60 calories fudgecicles. You could also buy some sugar free jello cups. Something to that nature to enjoy when you want sweets. There are baked chips, rice cakes, pop corn, etc when you want salty.
  • Lounmoun
    Lounmoun Posts: 8,427 Member
    You have 2 options to change the situation if you want to keep living together:
    1. Separate your food and eating from hers. Have your own food cupboard/shelf/bin or keep food in your rooms. Put food out of sight. Label things with your names. Only eat things you purchase for yourselves. Do different activities together. Work on strict self control and doing your own thing more.
    2. Persuade your roommate to change up her diet so you match more. Persuade her to eat certain problem foods outside the home. Get her to use MFP too. Plan meals together. Shop together. Offer to shop and cook for both of you.

    #1 is probably more realistic.
  • slaite1
    slaite1 Posts: 1,309 Member
    I'd ask her to keep it in her room. Make a joke of it, be self depreciating and explain that it's completely your fault-not hers for having it. If you're close, and have a sense of humor, it shouldn't be a big deal-at least until you have a handle on your self control.

    You could also explain exactly what you said here (maybe don't call her a garbage disposal :p ). Ask if she'd be interested in eating a little better. Explain how important it is to you, and in the very least she could not offer you the food.