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Strength Training During Weightloss? - Not Young Anymore

SilentpadnaSilentpadna Member Posts: 1,305 Member Member Posts: 1,305 Member
Hi all,

I'm currently almost 3 months into my weight loss program, 54yo male, 5'11", CW 206 (SW 240). It's going well in terms of weight loss. I'm currently eating a 750-1000 deficit target, with the idea to reduce that - but that depends some on whatever fitness program I decide to do next. My goal weight, when it comes is going to be somewhere around 175 (chosen to bring my body fat percentage back into the healthy range, but knowing that number might be somewhat arbitrary). I shoot for .8 to 1g of protein per pound of LBM and for now am not worried about where fat and carbs fall.

I chose Beachbody's P90 (not the X) to get active and augment that with about 12k steps per day, because I like to be something other than sedentary and I like to have some dietary freedom. For those unfamiliar, P90 is basically a ramp up to P90X - is mostly cardio-based, but has a fair amount of resistance training. I am improving, both in reps (for pushups) and weight for the dumb bell routines. (I did the P90X 7 years ago, starting in worse shape than I am now and it is an option for the next thing...)

Thursday will be the conclusion of that program for me and I will be looking for something to do next. I am not a member of a gym, but we have a full gym at my workplace so standard weight training is an option, although honestly I prefer doing stuff at home in our basement. I have dumb bells up to 30# (I think I will need heavier ones fairly soon if I stick with the basement). I do not have a flat or adjustable bench or rack.

As a 54 year old, I have a few minor issues that many men my age have: minor arthritis in a couple of my knuckles, and some occasional minor pain in my knees. I wear a soft brace on my knee(s) when it acts up a little.

My goal is to be both strong and lean, but not large. I would not mind some more muscle mass, but not much more.

So my question to the experts here is:

Given the context above, what might be a good program for me? Especially given my age and goals.

To be honest, I worry about a program like strong lifts because of 1) my knees, and 2) lack of a 'spotter' when the weight goes up.

Any suggestions are welcome, but if you do, a solid reason why would help me most. Thanks in advance!
edited May 2017

Replies

  • InterbeingInterbeing Member Posts: 33 Member Member Posts: 33 Member
    I am a 58 yo cyclist and have incorporated a dumbbell routine into my fitness schedule, for many of the reasons you mentioned. For me it is a good compliment to my cycling and really helps to strengthen my core. In addition to the dumbbell workout, I also do planks, pushups and dips. I really do notice the difference, and it is also a great way to start out the morning. Last season I also began a swimming routine, it was a real eye opener and a really good cardio workout, I slowly worked up to 1 mile over the season and plan to do the same again this year. All of this helped my cycling and last year I was able to pedal more than 5,000 miles, with a number of PRs, both road and MTB.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,859 Member Member Posts: 8,859 Member
    Either buy a set of free weights or hit the gym.

    Do Starting Strength program. You will get strong, not big because you need to eat alot to build mass at our age.



  • FatWithFatnessFatWithFatness Member Posts: 315 Member Member Posts: 315 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Either buy a set of free weights or hit the gym.

    Do Starting Strength program. You will get strong, not big because you need to eat alot to build mass at our age.


    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Either buy a set of free weights or hit the gym.

    Do Starting Strength program. You will get strong, not big because you need to eat alot to build mass at our age.



    Definitely check out starting strength.
  • tcunbelievertcunbeliever Member Posts: 8,059 Member Member Posts: 8,059 Member
    If it were me I would probably just go straight to P90X and just modify the plyo moves so that you aren't getting injured on those.
  • jemhhjemhh Member Posts: 14,274 Member Member Posts: 14,274 Member
    You don't need a spotter if you have proper equipment (e.g., a rack or stands with safeties.)
  • mattbell007mattbell007 Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member Member, Premium Posts: 29 Member
    I'm a 54 year-old who started 5 years ago at 300+, got down to 175, and am now back up to 203. I'm looking to get back to the 180 range. (Going on a cruise just before winter sets in doesn't help for weight maintenance.) I do cycling as my main cardio, and I do Stronglifts 5x5 for strength. That program starts with very low weights on purpose. The idea is to work on form and to strengthen the supporting (control) muscles, tendons, ligaments, joints, etc. while the weight is low. As the weight goes up, you can actually improve the strength of you knees and other joints if you do use the right form. I bought a squat rack so I didn't need a spotter (I had a barbell and some weights from years ago). You can't really do Stronglifts with dumbells.

    You shouldn't worry about getting body-builder muscles. That's like taking piano lessons worried that you might become a concert pianist.

    Whether or not you do Stronglifts, I definitely recommend working up to heavy weights. Not necessarily body-builder weights, but weights you can't do more than 5 or so reps for a set. That's the weight that really builds strength. It strengthens tendons and ligaments. Lighter weights tone and firm, but don't do much for the supporting structures.

    Broken record: form is key. I found the Stronglifts program excellent, but Medhi's a bit weak on detailing proper form. For that, I got a book called "Becoming a Supple Leopard" which was written by a physical therapist. That book is a little wacky, too, but the author's ideas about form were spot on. I gave up on Stronglifts once because of low back pain, but after reading that book, I was able to start again and the low back pain didn't return as the weights got heavier. The Supple Leopard book has a large section detailing things to do to work on joint issues.
  • SilentpadnaSilentpadna Member Posts: 1,305 Member Member Posts: 1,305 Member
    Excellent suggestions folks. Thanks for the feedback. Still not sure what I'll do. I don't have the equipment I need for home stuff just yet, and my work schedule would not allow for a steady 3 days per week of strong lifts (or a variation thereof) at our gym. I may stick with cardio and increased vigor in body weight and dumb bell routines until we can afford a rack/bench/barbell etc.

    But I do think real lifting is not far into the future.
  • laurenj915laurenj915 Member Posts: 38 Member Member Posts: 38 Member
    For that, I got a book called "Becoming a Supple Leopard" which was written by a physical therapist. That book is a little wacky, too, but the author's ideas about form were spot on. I gave up on Stronglifts once because of low back pain, but after reading that book, I was able to start again and the low back pain didn't return as the weights got heavier. The Supple Leopard book has a large section detailing things to do to work on joint issues.

    Great book! I contacted the author years ago when my husband (a firefighter) was having shoulder problems and was desperate to be cleared for work. He called my husband and designed a program over the phone just because he wanted to help.

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