Lifting on slope in garage bad?

I've been doing the Stonglifts 5x5 and only recently realized there is an ever so slight slope in my garage where I'm working out. I didn't bother thinking about it until I've been reaching the heavier (for me) weight. Does anyone know if the slope will cause any problems? Like will either side end up working more, will it cause improper form, injury?
Also, would there be an optimum way to use the slope? Stand with heels at the high end or stand uphill?
It's really a very slight one, but want to avoid injury.
TIA to anyone with feedback!
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Replies

  • Paco4gsc
    Paco4gsc Posts: 119 Member
    This is just my uneducated guess, but I think the optimal way of accounting for the slope would be with heels uphill and toes downhill. The reason being that you'll naturally compensate by leaning back slight and engaging your toes to stay straight. Since most of the time people's forms deteriorate by leaning forward too much, this may help with that. I'm basing this off the fact that people will use something to elevate their heels to fix squat form. This should cover squats, OHP, rows, and DL.

    For bench press, head going uphill would be like an incline press (more upper pecs), and head going downhill would be like a decline press (more lower pecs). You could switch between the two positions to keep things balanced, or stick with the incline position since your feet will be able to keep your body from shifting along the bench if that is a possibility.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    I would strongly advice against it. Too much bad can happen.
  • CipherZero
    CipherZero Posts: 1,418 Member
    Use floor leveler in the garage and r move the slope from your workout area. Alternatively build a platform and shim it as needed.
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,842 Member
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,553 Member
    it depends- is it side to side uneven or front to back uneven?

    If you are constantly lifting side to side uneven- that's way more an issue than with an imbalance front to back.

    Being said like @SonyaCele says- my gym is also uneven- and we lift just fine- but I make it a point to not lift in the same place every day.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    Just because you or your gym mates havn't had a accident yet doesn't mean it doesn't happen elsewhere. I've heard some horrer stories of people lifting on noticable unlevel floors over the years.

    Day to day activities don't usual include squatting with 2-3 x your body weight on the back.

    OP, the suggestion with self leveler isn't a bad idea though some forms can be very brittle. Platform shimmed safely is a decent idea as well.

  • chr1sttan
    chr1sttan Posts: 22 Member
    Thanks for the responses. I grabbed a level and discovered a more level area deeper into the garage than where my weight bench is currently sitting near the entrance. I don't know why I didn't think about using a level to check, so thanks for that suggestion! I think actually leveling the floor is beyond my ability, but I will move some stuff around to arrange the weight equipment at the most level spot for now.

    Thanks all!
  • JoRocka
    JoRocka Posts: 17,553 Member
    is your garage floor just concrete?
    If so - I recommend self leveling treatments
    https://www.concretenetwork.com/overlays-resurfacing-buyers-guide/self-leveling.html
  • chr1sttan
    chr1sttan Posts: 22 Member
    @JoRocka Yep, just concrete. Thanks for the link. I'll take a look, but I'm still intimidated to try myself. I would probably cause a bigger problem!
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,842 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    Just because you or your gym mates havn't had a accident yet doesn't mean it doesn't happen elsewhere. I've heard some horrer stories of people lifting on noticable unlevel floors over the years.

    Day to day activities don't usual include squatting with 2-3 x your body weight on the back.

    OP, the suggestion with self leveler isn't a bad idea though some forms can be very brittle. Platform shimmed safely is a decent idea as well.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,256 Member
    Just thinking you may end up looking like this guy:

  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    edited June 2017
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.
    Then if he asks about perfectly level surfaces your answer would suffice. He was asking about a surface that he deemed sloped. You advice him it's okay to lift heavy on uneven surface since you do.

    First you reply...
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine.

    Then you reply...
    Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

    So which is it?

    You lift heavy and it's fine?

    Or don't squat heavy and do light acessories?
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,842 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.
    Then if he asks about perfectly level surfaces your answer would suffice. He was asking about a surface that he deemed sloped. You advice him it's okay to lift heavy on uneven surface since you do.

    First you reply...
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine.

    Then you reply...
    Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

    So which is it?

    You lift heavy and it's fine?

    Or don't squat heavy and do light acessories?

    here is my original comment

    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    and yes i squat heavy on floor that isn't level, lots of people do. And the OP said that their floor is only a very slight slope. so yeah , i personally dont think a very slight slope is an issue for someone doing SL in their garage. Very slightly un-level isn't gonna be the cause of imbalanced muscles or injury. thats my opinion, people need to use their own judgement
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,842 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.
    Then if he asks about perfectly level surfaces your answer would suffice. He was asking about a surface that he deemed sloped. You advice him it's okay to lift heavy on uneven surface since you do.

    First you reply...
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine.

    Then you reply...
    Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

    So which is it?

    You lift heavy and it's fine?

    Or don't squat heavy and do light acessories?

    And your advice to him is stay out of the gym dont touch a weight , omg run away danger danger. Go hide in the bedroom and peek out the curtains because the world is full of danger? i just read your other comments, its ok i get it. the world is a dangerous scary place. You can hide and tell everyone else to hide from the scary uneven floor dont touch that weight because you saw someone else get hurt. He asked for feedback, he got your opinion and he got mine and he got others. Let him make his own decision
  • chr1sttan
    chr1sttan Posts: 22 Member
    Lol. do appreciate both perspectives. It's hard to know what I mean by uneven or what a "slight slope" is without seeing it yourself, so I am glad to have all responses to consider. I don't want to end up injured or like the guy in @CSARdiver 's video. :D

    Also, for the record, "He" is a "she" ;)

    Thanks everyone for sharing your experience and knowledge!
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.
    Then if he asks about perfectly level surfaces your answer would suffice. He was asking about a surface that he deemed sloped. You advice him it's okay to lift heavy on uneven surface since you do.

    First you reply...
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine.

    Then you reply...
    Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

    So which is it?

    You lift heavy and it's fine?

    Or don't squat heavy and do light acessories?

    And your advice to him is stay out of the gym dont touch a weight , omg run away danger danger. Go hide in the bedroom and peek out the curtains because the world is full of danger? i just read your other comments, its ok i get it. the world is a dangerous scary place. You can hide and tell everyone else to hide from the scary uneven floor dont touch that weight because you saw someone else get hurt. He asked for feedback, he got your opinion and he got mine and he got others. Let him make his own decision

    Actually it's the advice of many lifters and coaches that are well respected in the powerlifting community as well as doctors I know of that are well versed on lifting that deal with these type of questions on a regular basis. I'm not throwing random advice to see what sticks to the wall by any means.

    Previously, I agreed that floor leveler as well as a properly shimmed platform would be a good idea. Just because your two answers contradict each other, doesn't morph my comments into...

    "hide in a bedroom" or "don't touch weights".

    Don't put words in my mouth. Heavy weights should be respected & lifting on a surface that is considered "uphill" isn't something that considered normal lifting conditions by anybody who cares about safety of others. If that is leaning on the safe side, so be it.



  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,081 Member
    chr1sttan wrote: »
    Lol. do appreciate both perspectives. It's hard to know what I mean by uneven or what a "slight slope" is without seeing it yourself, so I am glad to have all responses to consider. I don't want to end up injured or like the guy in @CSARdiver 's video. :D

    Also, for the record, "He" is a "she" ;)

    Thanks everyone for sharing your experience and knowledge!

    My apologies for the error. I generally don't pay attention to a gender unless noted specifically in a question. Glad you found an easy solution.
    Good luck with your training!
  • SonyaCele
    SonyaCele Posts: 2,842 Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    SonyaCele wrote: »
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine. If its super uneven , i'd be careful of balancing heavy loads on a really uneven floor, But if its just slightly not level i personally don't think its a big deal. We are rarely on totally level and even surfaces in the real world for our day to day activities.

    i have also heard horror stories of people lifting on perfectly level surfaces. people need to use good judgement and decide if their flooring is safe. Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.
    Then if he asks about perfectly level surfaces your answer would suffice. He was asking about a surface that he deemed sloped. You advice him it's okay to lift heavy on uneven surface since you do.

    First you reply...
    my strength and conditioning gym floor is totally uneven and we all lift heavy and work hard, and we're fine.

    Then you reply...
    Obviously don't squat heavy on an uneven floor, but for lighter weight accessory lifts most of them can be done almost anywhere on any kinda surface.

    So which is it?

    You lift heavy and it's fine?

    Or don't squat heavy and do light acessories?

    And your advice to him is stay out of the gym dont touch a weight , omg run away danger danger. Go hide in the bedroom and peek out the curtains because the world is full of danger? i just read your other comments, its ok i get it. the world is a dangerous scary place. You can hide and tell everyone else to hide from the scary uneven floor dont touch that weight because you saw someone else get hurt. He asked for feedback, he got your opinion and he got mine and he got others. Let him make his own decision

    Actually it's the advice of many lifters and coaches that are well respected in the powerlifting community as well as doctors I know of that are well versed on lifting that deal with these type of questions on a regular basis. I'm not throwing random advice to see what sticks to the wall by any means.

    Previously, I agreed that floor leveler as well as a properly shimmed platform would be a good idea. Just because your two answers contradict each other, doesn't morph my comments into...

    "hide in a bedroom" or "don't touch weights".

    Don't put words in my mouth. Heavy weights should be respected & lifting on a surface that is considered "uphill" isn't something that considered normal lifting conditions by anybody who cares about safety of others. If that is leaning on the safe side, so be it.



    how did you twist around the OP doing SL on an ever so slight slope in her garage into her power lifting dangerously heavy weights on an uphill ?
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,256 Member
    Just a thought here - many builders deliberately create a minor slope in a garage to aid water drainage. Now for lifting weights this isn't a good thing, but you should be able to set up a level space for lifting. Just get some cheap subflooring (2 4x8 sheets) and level this under your rack/lifting area. This will also protect your concrete and your weights. I set up a workout area in the basement and sprung for the cool puzzle piece rubber matting.

    Do you know the degree of the slope? Is it like 1" every 8 ft? You can find this pretty quickly using a few stakes, string, and level.
  • chr1sttan
    chr1sttan Posts: 22 Member
    Thanks! Not sure the slope but that is a great idea for setting up a level area. Appreciate it!