Cooking chicken breast with no oil

thewindandthework
thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
edited July 2017 in Recipes
I have recently started tracking my macros instead of just my calories, and finding that my fat tends to be high and my protein low. So I'm adding more meat into my life after years of eating very, very little of it. I'm a good cook, but clueless about meat.

What's your favorite way to cook skinless boneless chicken breast without any added fat?

EDIT: After several helpful comments and some consideration, I have decided to incorporate two new methods into my bag of tricks: Grilling (in a grill pan, in my case), and poaching.

Slower methods that would also work are roasting and crock pot, for those rare moments when I have some time.
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Replies

  • PWRLFTR1
    PWRLFTR1 Posts: 324 Member
    Fire up the grill
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    I can't have a real grill but I have been considering a grill pan for my stove for a while. That's a good idea!
  • RunsWithBees
    RunsWithBees Posts: 1,508 Member
    You can boil it and shred it or cut it into chunks.
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,615 Member
    edited July 2017
    crockpot? baked?

    I don't worry about going over on fat, and I use a little butter in the cast iron skillet with chicken breast, otherwise it sticks. Meh. a gram or two of fat isn't a big deal. You can use broth, just watch for sticking.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    I have been skeptical about boiling, steaming, and microwave options because there's no opportunity for Maillard, but I could probably be convinced.

    How is the flavor when they're boiled?
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    Roasted makes a lot of sense to me, and it's what I do when I'm doing food prep for multiple days, but it's too slow for a weekday dinner for me. I've never even used my crockpot because I am a spontaneous cook. I'm already pushing my patience by planning two meals a day ahead of time, I don't think I could handle all three.

    I'm not worried about a gram or two of fat, but 40 grams in a teaspoon of olive oil is enough to make a real difference. Even 20 in a half teaspoon would cut a sizable amount of cabbage or broccoli out of my dinner.
  • jordyngiulio
    jordyngiulio Posts: 157 Member
    I second the crockpot! I also love to make it on the George Foreman grill thing - it sounds lame but chicken comes out great on there.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    Thanks for your help everyone!

    I do think I'm going to obtain a grill pan, since I was wanting one even in vegetarian mode, and I'm going to experiment with poaching the chicken. I think if it's not a rolling boil it shouldn't get too tough.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    Simply not overcooking can make a big difference.

    How about poaching in a little wine and stock?
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    lol, I was already coming up with different poaching liquids. I always have wine, garlic, and a ridiculous collection of herbs and spices. Getting creative with combinations will be fun.

    Commercial stock isn't really in my toolbelt for reasons of sodium and general disappointing flavor, and I don't think I'm ready to start making my own yet, but it's definitely something to consider.
  • dklibert
    dklibert Posts: 1,196 Member
    Look up Rachael Ray's recipe for poached chicken. She used bone-in skin on chicken breast, onion, garlic, carrot, celery, bay, peppercorns, herbs, lemon. It is really a great method plus you can strain and separate the broth and fat. Then you have great chicken and broth for recipes. Takes time but a great outcome.
  • AngryViking1970
    AngryViking1970 Posts: 2,848 Member
    poach it
  • stealthq
    stealthq Posts: 4,298 Member
    Thanks for your help everyone!

    I do think I'm going to obtain a grill pan, since I was wanting one even in vegetarian mode, and I'm going to experiment with poaching the chicken. I think if it's not a rolling boil it shouldn't get too tough.

    America's Test Kitchen and Alton Brown have excellent methods for poaching.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,171 Member
    I can't have a real grill but I have been considering a grill pan for my stove for a while. That's a good idea!

    When I lived in my apartment and couldn't have a bbq grill, I had a George Foreman grill...I pretty much cooked all of my meats on that thing.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    I was just pricing a Foreman grill on Amazon and am seriously considering it.
  • wimdroid
    wimdroid Posts: 56 Member
    Tried sous-vide?
  • piperdown44
    piperdown44 Posts: 958 Member
    I think pounding them down until they are about 3/8-1/2 thick, then marinade in a zip lock or dish, and a quick grill (4-5 mins) per side is the way to go after trying quite a few methods. They come out flavorful and moist. You can either serve them as is or cut into strips to add to salad.
    I've used different marinades such as Italian dressing, buffalo sauce, teriyaki, chipotle, bbq, garlic and herb, etc.
  • BurgerLovinBulker
    BurgerLovinBulker Posts: 38 Member
    Fat isn't that bad....I generally eat chicken with a few strips of bacon, so the chicken is fried in the bacon fat.

    Grilling is a great option. So is poaching, but I can't stand the taste.

    Sous vide & a quick sear with a blow torch?
    Baked with onion, garlic, & lemon?
    Slow cooker with chipotle & a Mexican spice rub?
    Reverse seared and smoked under a hood? Or even smoked in a smoker with a chipotle BBQ sauce.

    Chicken is a great base for just about anything
  • Alatariel75
    Alatariel75 Posts: 17,945 Member
    edited July 2017
    Panda8ach wrote: »
    I use coconut oil :) Still not great but better :#

    How better? Same calories, high in saturated fat, becoming widely recognised as having been totally over-hyped in recent history...

    I personally don't like poached chicken breast. I tend to season and fry in a non-stick pan.