Why do cheap eggs make me sick?

13

Replies

  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Maybe something like this:

    VioletRojo wrote: »
    DamieBird wrote: »
    CMNVA wrote: »
    It's probably something in the feed. Eggland's Best eggs actually have a little bit lower calorie count than a regular egg based on the hens' feed.

    This is from their website:

    The unique patented diet of our hens is nutritionally superior to that fed to other hens, so Eggland's Best hens lay naturally superior eggs. Eggland's Best hens are fed a wholesome all-vegetarian, high-quality diet with no animal fat, no animal by-products, and no recycled or processed food.

    I hate that "all-vegetarian" is used as a marker for superior when it comes to eggs! If I could get them, I'd take the eggs from chickens who are out foraging for bugs over vegetarian fed any day. I'm on board with the rest of the diet, there just isn't anything better about vegetarian chickens!

    Chickens aren't supposed to be vegetarian. My eggs (who lay fabulous eggs) roam my yard at least a couple of hours every day eating all kinds of yummy bugs. I feel sorry for the vegetarian chickens.
    Me too. It's really sad if it's true, and sad if "vegetarian chickens" sells eggs (and I believe both are true). It's catering to the urban population who's never seen a live chicken. The "no processed food" is most likely BS; at any rate, "processed food" means nothing.

    So why do Egglands eggs best sell in the first place. Must be hard to sell eggs for 3.49 a dozen with 99 cent eggs right next to them. There is an answer out there.
    Read "The Undercover Economist" by Tim Harford - he explains this.
  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    edited July 2017
    girlinahat wrote: »
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.

    They are subjected to precise temperatures for precise durations which is enough to kill some bacteria but not enough to cook the eggs.
  • OliveGirl128
    OliveGirl128 Posts: 801 Member
    edited July 2017
    I pay $8 a dozen for my free range eggs.

    Dang! You could have a couple chickens for that cost :p

    Op, odd that you're having a reaction! Do you have any local options that you could try? You could look on Craigs List or check these sites out for what's in your area (assuming you're in the U.S.). I always see them at farmer's markets too, usually for $3-$4 a dozen.

    http://www.eatwild.com/

    https://www.localharvest.org/organic-farms/

  • Chef_Barbell
    Chef_Barbell Posts: 6,656 Member
    I never has a reaction to inexpensive eggs. I get them no more than a buck a dozen. I'm not paying more than that.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    girlinahat wrote: »
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.

    Our commercial eggs are pasteurized in-shell, but are definitely still raw. Standard practice in the US. We have weird and often counterproductive food laws. We aren't allowed to have raw milk, either.

    I worked really hard to avoid making this response nonpolitical, but I think I pulled it off.
  • UpEarly
    UpEarly Posts: 2,567 Member
    And the irony... Eggland's Best are actually crap-quality, factory farmed eggs, too. The company has been in trouble a few times for their farming practices and horrific treatment of their chickens. Do a bit of research on the company and you'll find out pretty fast that their not all they're cracked up to be!

  • Francl27
    Francl27 Posts: 26,373 Member
    TR0berts wrote: »
    So why do Egglands eggs best sell in the first place. Must be hard to sell eggs for 3.49 a dozen with 99 cent eggs right next to them. There is an answer out there.
    @ jenny - I know Costco would not re-package eggs and name them cage free.

    Yes, the cage free eggs are from a different farm where the chickens are allowed access outside at some point in the day. I'm not sure where Egglands come from, but they sell them in my area too so I assume they are just from a bunch of contracted farms around the country using the standard methods for egg production. They cost more because they are branded.

    Often, they're from the same farm. Just different buildings. And cage-free doesn't necessarily mean they ever go outside - just that they can roam around the building.

    EB comes from the same exact farms that just about every other egg comes from.

    I know this because my SIL works at one of New England's biggest egg farms and gets eggs as part of her compensation - she's gotten a bunch of "brands" that I've never heard of (probably certain stores' own brands), as well as EB.

    And, yes, EB eggs cost more simply for the name.

    So why do they claim to be fewer calories then?

    OP... do allergy testing. Seriously.
  • bpetrosky
    bpetrosky Posts: 3,911 Member
    The feed does seem to affect the egg quality. I visited Japan last year and stayed where I could cook my own breakfast. The eggs had the brightest, almost fluorescent, orange yolks. The texture was better when I cooked them scrambled, too. I've never found eggs like that even at the organic store near me.

    Also, sliced butter sticks were totally a thing there, but that's another post.
  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
    girlinahat wrote: »
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.

    Our commercial eggs are pasteurized in-shell, but are definitely still raw. Standard practice in the US. We have weird and often counterproductive food laws. We aren't allowed to have raw milk, either.

    I worked really hard to avoid making this response nonpolitical, but I think I pulled it off.

    thanks. I had just never heard of such a thing. Here in the UK we have a 'Lion' mark on eggs in supermarkets, which is a guarantee that the eggs have been vaccinated against salmonella. No lion mark, and you take your chances.

    I am happy to live in a country where the availability of soft, unpasteurised delicious cheese is fully endorsed (except for pregnant women).
  • Treece68
    Treece68 Posts: 780 Member
    90% of the time I have the same issue with eggs, but only when I eat them straight. If they are in something like cake I don't have an issue. I am guessing that it has something to do with me having no gallbladder? I really don't know it is always a gamble but I don't just get abdominal pain it all comes out.
  • Dnarules
    Dnarules Posts: 2,080 Member
    girlinahat wrote: »
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.

    Our commercial eggs are pasteurized in-shell, but are definitely still raw. Standard practice in the US. We have weird and often counterproductive food laws. We aren't allowed to have raw milk, either.

    I worked really hard to avoid making this response nonpolitical, but I think I pulled it off.

    Not all of our eggs are pasteurized. If it doesn't say it on the package, they ate not. I have no issue getting unpasteurized eggs in our store.
  • sarahshinks2233
    sarahshinks2233 Posts: 59 Member
    There is no way that painful one hour cramping is in my head. This has been going on for almost 10 years. Is there something to the more expensive eggs that makes them better?
    It even happens w/ boiled eggs in case anyone says it might be the cooking method. Even boiled eggs (the same way) the cheap ones cause problems.
    Maybe a better question would be do you eat Egglands best eggs and why? I bought them just b/c I had a coupon one day.

    Why were you eating something that caused this? I really would be concerned and go to the doctor, get an allergy test done.
  • nevadavis1
    nevadavis1 Posts: 339 Member
    I don't know why the difference but I got similar symptoms eating eggs growing up and when I finally got allergy tested I'm allergic. Like can't get the flu shot allergic. So I wonder if they are feeding the chickens something you're allergic too and those allergens are coming through?
  • festerw
    festerw Posts: 233 Member
    girlinahat wrote: »
    Are your nice fancy eggs unpasteurized? That's really the only difference between excellent farm fresh eggs and the mass-produced ones, other than price and the treatment of the animals.

    how do you pasteurise an egg? Surely all raw eggs are unpastuerised, otherwise they would be...cooked.

    Our commercial eggs are pasteurized in-shell, but are definitely still raw. Standard practice in the US. We have weird and often counterproductive food laws. We aren't allowed to have raw milk, either.

    I worked really hard to avoid making this response nonpolitical, but I think I pulled it off.

    This varies depending on the state you live in, I could pick up raw milk on my way home. It is illegal to sell it across state lines though.

    Also as mentioned above the only eggs that are pasteurized are ones that are labeled as such.
  • Treece68
    Treece68 Posts: 780 Member
    edited July 2017
    There is no way that painful one hour cramping is in my head. This has been going on for almost 10 years. Is there something to the more expensive eggs that makes them better?
    It even happens w/ boiled eggs in case anyone says it might be the cooking method. Even boiled eggs (the same way) the cheap ones cause problems.
    Maybe a better question would be do you eat Egglands best eggs and why? I bought them just b/c I had a coupon one day.

    Why were you eating something that caused this? I really would be concerned and go to the doctor, get an allergy test done.[/quot

    I have same issue and the answer is they are delicious the same with milk
  • snickerscharlie
    snickerscharlie Posts: 8,582 Member
    edited July 2017
    UpEarly wrote: »
    And the irony... Eggland's Best are actually crap-quality, factory farmed eggs, too. The company has been in trouble a few times for their farming practices and horrific treatment of their chickens. Do a bit of research on the company and you'll find out pretty fast that their not all they're cracked up to be!

    quru0iys3c91.jpg

    You might even say the yolk's on them.

    :)
  • Old_Cat_Lady
    Old_Cat_Lady Posts: 1,200 Member
    I did not know that if I'm allergic to eggs, I could also be allergic to the flu shot. I got the flu shot once and felt like I had a cold for a day after and I read this was common in some people.
    But if I were allergic to eggs, wouldn't I be allergic to all eggs?

    It's only the cheap ol' walmart eggs that give me the problem. Just about anything that is cage free or more expensive don't do this to me. I really am starting to think it's something in the feed. I can't find any information on what walmart egg chickens are fed. It's not about taste, it's about this pain.
  • thewindandthework
    thewindandthework Posts: 531 Member
    Thanks for the corrections, @Dnarules and @festerw ! Either I haven't been paying close enough attention in my markets (very possible), or my state demands pasteurization.