How Easy Was It For You To Lose Weight?

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Replies

  • mel2382016
    mel2382016 Posts: 13 Member
    It's been hard sometimes and easy sometimes. I have lost 105 pounds in four years. Navigating life and parties and celebrations and figuring out how to change lifelong habits and behaviors for good. That was the hard part. The scale not cooperating at times is hard. It is worth sticking with it even if you backslide now and then. If you keep trying and work on consistency it works.
  • shrcpr
    shrcpr Posts: 884 Member
    I'm 5'4" and getting from 155 to 135 was relatively easy over about a four-month period. I stayed there for quite some time because I had a lot of life happening and decided to maintain until things calmed down. I'm now down to 130 but that 5 pounds took around 3 months. I'd like to get down even more but I'm also training for a half-marathon so my fitness goals are contrary to carrying too much of a deficit.

    It's hard at this point because you have to be so accurate for such a long period of time and the deficit is so small that even one day of crazy can wipe out the deficit from your entire week or more.
  • TorStar80
    TorStar80 Posts: 252 Member
    It's pretty easy for me to lose weight, a bit more difficult to keep it off, but a lot easier with the right tools and attitudes. I had to rearrange my food environment, my eating habits, cook more, educate myself, learn to handle stress and emotions better, and simply start to think like a normal weight person.

    I think you're way ahead of the game because you're honest about what's holding you back from losing more - not eating at a calorie deficit, and not wanting to do that, and acknowledging temptations.

    If you want the rest of your weight to go away and stay away (great job on the 30 you've already lost, btw), you have to eat less, there is no way around that. The most effective approach is to want it, but in order to want it, you have to find a way to eat less that you like, because this, you'll be doing for a long, long time (the rest of your life). Exactly what that would be, is up to you to find out, but a suggestion to what you can do, is reframing:

    You can still eat good food, and eat what you like, but you have to be more ruthless in your priorities - work smarter, not harder. Plan your meals. Plan for meals you know you enjoy, line up your favorites. Base your intake on rewarding, but not too stimulating, foods. Don't bring home foods you tend to want to overeat, instead eat them at intervals, reserve them for special occasions where servings are controlled because portions are normal, or by social norms. Eating at "all you can eat" buffets are best avoided as much as possible, until you feel more relaxed around food. (Keep in mind that even though you may find eating relaxing, overeating so much that you've gotten overweight, is an indication that the way you are eating, is somehow causing you stress.)

    Exercise moderately (whatever that means to you), find an activity you enjoy, keep at it, and change it up when you don't enjoy it anymore.

    Get enough sleep and rest, too.

    Then accept that no plan is so great and perfect that you'll never feel tempted to overeat, or never find yourself having overeaten. That is perfectly OK! If you make it easier to make better choices, you will make better choices, and if you make good choices more often than bad choices, you will succeed. [/quot

    I really really love everything you said.
  • sofchak
    sofchak Posts: 862 Member
    A lot of what's been said already... driven by bad bloodwork, I knew I needed to change my diet. I also knew I didn't just want to lose weight; I wanted to be fit. Lost 30 lbs and traded photography for running as a main source of personal entertainment starting early 2016. Maintaining since November. I underestimated how much of a mental game maintenance would be... way harder to maintain than it was to lose.
  • TorStar80
    TorStar80 Posts: 252 Member
    sofchak wrote: »
    A lot of what's been said already... driven by bad bloodwork, I knew I needed to change my diet. I also knew I didn't just want to lose weight; I wanted to be fit. Lost 30 lbs and traded photography for running as a main source of personal entertainment starting early 2016. Maintaining since November. I underestimated how much of a mental game maintenance would be... way harder to maintain than it was to lose.

    Curious what you mean by mental game.. ?

  • SkimpyMrsCarter
    SkimpyMrsCarter Posts: 105 Member
    edited July 2017
    I have lost 32lbs so far, in order for me to get this far, I exercise, i cut out salt, I no longer eat pork, beef or fried foods and i count calories.l also drink plenty of water. When i get bored with my diet i indulge in things that my diet dont consist of but i dont go overboard and i still count calories and get right back on track because i am motivated by the fact that i am the only one that can do this, noone can do it for me. But it was not easy for me
  • packersfan0103
    packersfan0103 Posts: 236 Member
    It hasn't been easy at all. I don't have much support. Its not easy to get to the gym. Everytime I tell my husband I'm going to try to eat healthy he buys me something sweet knowing I have an insatiable sweet tooth and no will power what so ever.
  • pamfgil
    pamfgil Posts: 449 Member
    edited July 2017
    Don't make annoucements about what you intend to do, and throw salt or something bitter on to whatever sweet things he brings home ;)
  • packersfan0103
    packersfan0103 Posts: 236 Member
    Maybe it's a subconscious thing. He doesn't want me to lose weight so that others won't look at me. Not that I'm much to look at but he was interested. So.......
  • T1DCarnivoreRunner
    T1DCarnivoreRunner Posts: 11,462 Member
    It was very difficult for me. For the first 2+ years, I tried eating at a calorie deficit. Based on the CICO formula, I should have been losing significantly faster - about 4-5 times faster. During that time, I have several "true" plateaus where I was still eating at a deficit and just wasn't losing weight. I tried various things to end each plateau, but ultimately they ended on their own at unpredictable times. Fortunately, plateaus ended with a "whoosh" and the longest plateau was about 5-6 months, so that "whoosh" was several lbs. over only a few days time.

    After spending more than 2 years struggling, hungry, and yet still losing only 25 lbs.; I tried switching to low carb. I started at the high end - 150g per day - and gradually decreased carbs over 6 months until I was at about 20g-30g net carbs daily. I lost steadily over this time, and the CICO formula finally matched the scale and I lost almost 25 lbs. more during that 6 months. Then I stalled out at 20g-30g per day. After stalling for 6 months, I decided to go zero carb / carnivorous, which has been successful for a few months now.

    The part I continue struggling with is low calorie intake. Now that I'm down to 10 lbs. left to lose, and my RMR is 1,500 (tested in a lab); I need to exercise a lot to eat much or just not eat much. My calorie goal, before exercise, is 1,300 daily. I have a difficult time sticking with that. At this point, I'm going to stay zero carb / carnivorous because it helps keep BG stable and has proven to work better and be easier than anything else I've tried as of yet. But to get the last few lbs. of fat to go away, I'm starting to switch away from fatty meats (pork, beef) to eat more lean meats. If I get 120g-150g of protein per day from fish, chicken, and eggs; there is less fat with that and fewer calories than the same protein from pork and beef. As a result, I'm going to need to use body fat for energy rather than dietary fat. I'm hoping I can get rid of the final 10 lbs. by the end of 2017.
  • l911jnt
    l911jnt Posts: 162 Member
    Ive lost 35 lbs. Some days were days and weeks were easy and some were really really hard. I hate working out. Seriously. Ive come to a place now where I have 20 more to lose and have upped my calories like you because I feel like if I dont, I will give up. Its still slowly coming off.... veeeeeeery slowly but I will get there. Im only striving for .5 lbs a week now.
  • mmnv79
    mmnv79 Posts: 538 Member
    l911jnt wrote: »
    Ive lost 35 lbs. Some days were days and weeks were easy and some were really really hard. I hate working out. Seriously. Ive come to a place now where I have 20 more to lose and have upped my calories like you because I feel like if I dont, I will give up. Its still slowly coming off.... veeeeeeery slowly but I will get there. Im only striving for .5 lbs a week now.

    0.5 lbs a week isn't bad at all considering you only have 20 lbs to lose. Keep it up the good work!
  • ZhivagosGirl
    ZhivagosGirl Posts: 161 Member
    Losing it is easy - it's keeping it off that's hard. Throughout the course of the last 30 years I've probably lost and gained 350 lbs - not including the 60 lbs I've lost this year. I'm hoping that plain old CICO and exercise and a slower pace this time is the ticket and I'll finally keep it off.
  • Aerona85
    Aerona85 Posts: 159 Member
    For me losing it is pretty easy, keeping it off, not so much. The biggest challenge I have is having to prepare ahead. If I don't have tomorrow's breakfast and lunch packed and ready to grab and go in the morning, my whole day is in jeopardy. And weather can be a challenge as I don't have a gym or gym equipment in my house. But I am back on the wagon for the 3rd or 4th time now. I generally lose right on what MFP calculates as long as I eat within or a tad below my range. I do eat back my Fitbit cals. It seems to be accurate for me.
  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,841 Member
    edited July 2017
    Still a work in progress.

    In general I do pretty well dieting and maintaining when my health is good. I was skinny growing up, despite very bad eating habits, stayed skinny throughout college, then developed lupus and became much more sedentary. About the same time I blew out my knee, and that put me over the line into completely sedentary for several months. Gained a bunch of weight over the next couple of years. Then my lupus gave me a break, and I lost fifty pounds in six months, getting back to my college weight - easy - kept it off for the next couple of years - lupus started acting up again and the pounds started to come back on, bringing friends. Lupus gave me another break eventually and I lost fifty pounds in six months again - only because I had gained more weight this time, that didn't get me back down to my starting weight. Somewhere on the internet still exists the blog post I made about how happy I was to have lost fifty pounds, followed the VERY NEXT DAY by a post about not feeling good, which was the beginning of heart inflammation and vasculitis caused by a lupus flare. Then I abandoned my blog and my diet both, because I was too sick.

    This is my third go round. I still have lupus, but now I also have diabetes, and so losing weight and getting my insulin resistance to improve is much more important. I got a jump start on weight loss by losing twenty-five pounds in the single month before I was diagnosed, due to stress caused by pain from an ovarian torsion and benign tumor which was mishandled. I was a pretty sick kitty! I weighed 272 when I went to the ER with abdominal pain in November and 247 when I was finally operated on in December. After six weeks of recovery, I started working out and logging, and I'm now down 61 pounds from 247, with my goal weight still 20 lbs off. So I guess if you count the weight I lost while sick, I'm down 86 lbs.

    Undiagnosed diabetes and ovarian tumor is definitely the quickest diet I've ever been on, but I don't recommend it!

    When I first started my diet this time, I was eating about 1500 - 1800 gross calories, with about 400 - 600 calories exercise / day, and losing about 3.5 lbs / week. However, that rapid weight loss led to a plateau about three months in. My feet were dragging and I had stopped losing. I upped my calories, added some higher intensity cardio intervals, and the pounds started coming off again. While I was in the obese BMI range, I was able to consistently lose about 10 lbs / month while feeling good. Now that I'm in the overweight category, I've upped my calories again, and I'm aiming for 6 lbs / month. So far so good.

    I know it's a truism that weight loss is not linear, but for the most part, mine is very consistent and predictable. I weigh myself every day, but only record the new lows, and the pattern is regular, with two week long exceptions which both represent illnesses. Apparently when I have a minor illness, my metabolism slows down - even when I factor in reduced activity - and weight loss stops temporarily. It's not water weight being retained, since there is never a whoosh later.

    I know that eventually my lupus is going to flare again, and that this time I will have the added problems caused by my diabetes. I'm hoping that having constant feedback from my blood sugar testing will help me stick to an appropriate diet even when my health is challenging.
  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,830 Member
    amtyrell wrote: »
    Very easy and very hard.
    Very easy in that it is a simple rule of eat less than burn.
    Very hard in that it takes willpower.

    ^^^THIS!!!^^^
  • JeromeBarry1
    JeromeBarry1 Posts: 10,187 Member
    Machka9 wrote: »
    I already owned a treadmill. I didn't have to join a gym for that. Once I decided to do it, doing it was easy. Deciding to do it was hard.

    Yeah ... kind of the same thing with me and my bicycles.

    There I was struggling and wheezing up hills on my bicycle, and having a miserable time. Then one day in early December 2014, I thought ... "I could continue to have a miserable time ... or I could start to do something about it".

    I started attacking the local hills and cycling a lot more ... and then in mid-Feb 2015, I joined MFP. :)

    I've had my cheap mountain bike 37 years. Several years ago, long before joining MFP or even intending to lose weight, I decided to start riding it again. I replaced the saddle and took it in to a LBS for equipment updates and tune-up. That all turned into a good spend when I started riding more often in the past year.