Sore. What's normal?

I strained the back of my legs either cycling or with straight legged dead lifts. I'm new to lifting so I'm not really sure which it is, but cycling has never made my legs feel this way. I also worked my arms Monday and I'm still sore.

I took yesterday off from cycling.

So the question is, seeing as I'm still sore, should I work my arms again today, or hold off? Are you supposed to be fully rested before you work a body part again, or should there be some residual soreness?

Replies

  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,610 Member
    There really isn't a "should" or a "normal"... everyone is different in this regard, and different workouts can produce different types of soreness.

    Generally speaking, if the soreness is significant enough that it will impact your ability to workout "properly" (form, intensity, duration, etc... whatever that may mean to you and your workout), then wait. Use the muscles to help loosen them up and speed up recovery (walking, swimming, cycling, stretching, etc... just keep it light). Then get back on your routine once you feel up for that day's workout.
  • rachel780mpg
    rachel780mpg Posts: 83 Member
    For me, it makes my muscles feel better to work them out again.
  • visualizefit
    visualizefit Posts: 26 Member
    Thank you, guys.
  • capaul42
    capaul42 Posts: 1,391 Member
    For me, it makes my muscles feel better to work them out again.

    Same here. I'm currently still sore from weeding my back yard on Monday and my Sunday/Tuesday workouts. I still plan on my regular workout tonight.
  • sllm1
    sllm1 Posts: 2,129 Member
    Once you warm up properly, you won't feel the soreness. It helps me to work out the soreness as well.
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,969 Member
    OP: I personally do not work out sore muscles. I let them rest and use palliative measures if necessary to relieve the soreness until it goes away.

    Like pain, soreness is your body teling you that something is wrong. You can either listen to that msg or not.

    I know its popular to say it's better to work thru the soreness or that it actually helps make the soreness go away. I do not believe EITHER of tgese things to be true.

    Just because you CAN work thru soreness doesn't nean you SHOULD. As long as you don't work the muscles too hard in a way that exaccerbates the soreness & /or causes an injury, it it should be ok but, if your muscles are sore, they are telling you that they have been overworked and need time to rest to recover.

    I listen to that msg and think that you should as well.
  • collectingblues
    collectingblues Posts: 2,540 Member
    I tend to work out when dealing with soreness in a certain set of situations. A 3 or 5 mile run resulting in some aching glutes and calves? Yup, I'll push myself to go to barre, because I know it'll get better. It'll get worse before it gets better, and maybe it's psychosomatic, but I know that pushing them to fatigue/exhaustion in class usually results in them feeling better a few hours later.

    10 miles or a half marathon, where everything hurts? Nope. That's what a reverse taper is for.
  • Rusty740
    Rusty740 Posts: 749 Member
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    There really isn't a "should" or a "normal"... everyone is different in this regard, and different workouts can produce different types of soreness.

    Generally speaking, if the soreness is significant enough that it will impact your ability to workout "properly" (form, intensity, duration, etc... whatever that may mean to you and your workout), then wait. Use the muscles to help loosen them up and speed up recovery (walking, swimming, cycling, stretching, etc... just keep it light). Then get back on your routine once you feel up for that day's workout.

    This^. and to add, you'll get sore if you start something new. Either cardio or a new exercise, once your body becomes adjusted to it, the soreness will either go away, or be less sore depending on how much you push it.

    Soreness is generally good if it doesn't result in you not being able to complete a similar workout after a bit of rest. You'll have to be the judge of the soreness to decide whether it's injury or not. Muscle soreness=good - joint, tendon, ligament soreness=generally bad.
  • CipherZero
    CipherZero Posts: 1,418 Member
    I try to at least get my warm-up weights in; more than once a "sore back" was resolved by the warm-up sets. If it's not, I'll do less weight or bail out entirely on a scheduled session depending how much soreness or pain there is.
  • zandrathesweetheart
    zandrathesweetheart Posts: 109 Member
    Personally I never do added strength training when that muscle is sore.
  • mhwitt74
    mhwitt74 Posts: 159 Member
    Depends on the intensity of the soreness. Perfectly normal to be a little sore after a new workout or long hike etc. Just listen to your body and start working out again when you can and at an intensity level that doesn't stress those muscle too far.
  • visualizefit
    visualizefit Posts: 26 Member
    Thank you for the input, guys. I'm just starting weight training and pushed my arms a bit hard last time. Held off on the workout Thursday.

    Was gonna do it today, but I'm meeting a trainer to learn how to do my legs tomorrow!

    Wasn't sure if I should do strength training two days back to back!

    Opinions on that? How much rest should you have between working different muscle groups and how often should your strength train in a week?

    If you do arms and legs twice each, how do you get on a schedule, given a weak is inherently uneven?
  • mhwitt74
    mhwitt74 Posts: 159 Member
    It is better in my opinion ( which is what has worked for me ) to have a days rest in between workouts. I do cardio and weights on the same day so a day in between gives me time to recover. I know people who lift 5 or 6 days a week so it is possible to do them back to back. But, don't jump in the deep end right off the bat. Work yourself up at your own pace, everyone is different. As far as there being 7 days in a week is kinda not relevant. Take 2 days off or 2 days back to back. Whatever works for you. I usually take the weekends off and spend with the family.
  • Rusty740
    Rusty740 Posts: 749 Member
    Thank you for the input, guys. I'm just starting weight training and pushed my arms a bit hard last time. Held off on the workout Thursday.

    Was gonna do it today, but I'm meeting a trainer to learn how to do my legs tomorrow!

    Wasn't sure if I should do strength training two days back to back!

    Opinions on that? How much rest should you have between working different muscle groups and how often should your strength train in a week?

    If you do arms and legs twice each, how do you get on a schedule, given a weak is inherently uneven?

    When you're starting out (first 2 years or so), you're probably doing the same body part 2-5 times per week. 2 x if it's heavy, 5 times if it's light. Generally, you'll need 60-120 reps per week of larger muscle groups and 30-60 of smaller muscle groups.

    It is perfectly fine to workout two days in a row sometimes, just give each body part one day off at least before the next workout.

    If you can't figure out how to do arms and legs twice per week, just do them 4 times every 2 weeks :) I'm being cheeky, but many programs are based around two week groups. Take Stronglifts 5x5, week 1 has mon/fri the same as week 2 wed. Week 1 Wed is the same as week 2 mon/fri. This way you can even it out and also get two days off on the weekend.

    Don't get overly stressed about this, find something that works with your schedule that has 3 or 4 days off per week and you'll be just fine.
  • visualizefit
    visualizefit Posts: 26 Member
    For me, it makes my muscles feel better to work them out again.

    I'm the same.

    Even when I feel DOMS, it's the first few movements that are hard to get through but after that it's alright. It's really just a matter of you being able to differentiate the kind of pain you're having - whether it's from a good workout or if you've actually hurt yourself.

    What is DOMS?
  • capaul42
    capaul42 Posts: 1,391 Member
    Delayed Onset Muscles Soreness
  • visualizefit
    visualizefit Posts: 26 Member
    Rusty740 wrote: »
    Thank you for the input, guys. I'm just starting weight training and pushed my arms a bit hard last time. Held off on the workout Thursday.

    Was gonna do it today, but I'm meeting a trainer to learn how to do my legs tomorrow!

    Wasn't sure if I should do strength training two days back to back!

    Opinions on that? How much rest should you have between working different muscle groups and how often should your strength train in a week?

    If you do arms and legs twice each, how do you get on a schedule, given a weak is inherently uneven?

    When you're starting out (first 2 years or so), you're probably doing the same body part 2-5 times per week. 2 x if it's heavy, 5 times if it's light. Generally, you'll need 60-120 reps per week of larger muscle groups and 30-60 of smaller muscle groups.

    It is perfectly fine to workout two days in a row sometimes, just give each body part one day off at least before the next workout.

    If you can't figure out how to do arms and legs twice per week, just do them 4 times every 2 weeks :) I'm being cheeky, but many programs are based around two week groups. Take Stronglifts 5x5, week 1 has mon/fri the same as week 2 wed. Week 1 Wed is the same as week 2 mon/fri. This way you can even it out and also get two days off on the weekend.

    Don't get overly stressed about this, find something that works with your schedule that has 3 or 4 days off per week and you'll be just fine.

    This was very helpful. I hadn't thought of a two week structure!
  • DancingMoosie
    DancingMoosie Posts: 8,519 Member
    I only lift twice per week, it gives me wiggle room to deal with soreness. If I lift Monday, I can go back Wed, or if I'm too sore, Thur. I basically do all 5 lifts from SL 5x5 each workout, and add glute bridge and some accessories.
  • canadianlbs
    canadianlbs Posts: 5,199 Member
    there's a difference between 'sore' and 'strained'. it takes a little while to recognise the difference, at least it did for me.

    personally, i would leave 'strained' stuff alone and let it get better first. 'sore' i would probably feel safe to keep working through, assuming i can assemble the chutzpah to face those first four or five reps before the blood's moving again.