Sweating/Walking/Backpack/Help D:

BlueberryJoghurt
BlueberryJoghurt Posts: 67 Member
edited September 2017 in Fitness and Exercise
Good morning ladys and gents!

I seek thine help!

So I basically started walking a lot after I lost quite a bit of weight, to the extent that Im walking to and from work everyday now (5,5km (3,4miles) each way so at least a total of 11km (6,8 miles)). One way takes about an hour - its all fine and good and sometimes I even talk to people on my way - no problem.

Now the thing is, during the summer heat I usually took a 2nd shirt with me to change at work cause walking an hour at 27°C + is a sweaty thing (I usually walk the 5,5km in 55-60min).
Ok now that its getting colder outside this is posing somewhat of a problem because even with temperatures going down, I still sweat under my backpack even with just a shirt on. (armpits, under the straps and on the back) The problem about this is that it means I had to pack a sweater, a shirt and a scarf today. And Im guessing the colder it gets Ill also need to pack a jacket. Thats not really sustainable. (btw Im using deodorant but w/o mineral salts as I feel like I tried the ones with salts and it didnt do anything for me)

Now I dont really know how to solve this problem. Any ideas? Advice on how to sweat less? Any good jackets youd recommend? https://imgur.com/a/45PbG maybe this is helpful as a reference point for general fitness level, in case that helps? (also yeah slacked during the summer heat and didnt walk as much on the 30°C+ days - boo me!)

Anyway thanks in advance fit beasts!

Replies

  • GemstoneofHeart
    GemstoneofHeart Posts: 864 Member
    What if you changed to a rolling backpack (similar to a carry on) so you dont have the backpack on your pack preventing that area from "breathing"?
  • BlueberryJoghurt
    BlueberryJoghurt Posts: 67 Member
    What if you changed to a rolling backpack (similar to a carry on) so you dont have the backpack on your pack preventing that area from "breathing"?

    Im using the backpack to get my stuff to and from work, not for work (:
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,465 Member
    Wear wicking shirts like a running shirt or other technical shirt. They come in short and long sleeves depending on the weather. This will keep you more comfortable. Layer polartec fleece over it in colder weather. Use a top layer that's water proof or windproof when needed. Wear layers that zip open half way if not all the way so you can "vent" your body heat. It's amazing how much more comfortable you can be just by letting some of the warm air escape. Some shirts and jackets have underarm vents/zips that can be helpful. If you don't already have such clothing, you can pick some up at Goodwill or other thrift store. It might require checking back a few times because stock rotates quickly.

    You could also consider looking for a different pack. Look for a hiking day pack with a mesh panel on the back or a lumbar pack that doesn't sit on your shoulders.

    Happy walking!
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,974 Member
    No solution for sweating. It's genetic.

    Only solution for cold weather comfort is to wear as many layers as necessary for warmth. How many layers will vary based on your body metabolism, the temp and your level of activity. However, the key is to wear clothing made of materials that will allow the sweat to wick away from your skin and evaporate thru your clothing.

    The worst material is cotton and the best is synthetic. Here's a link to sn REI article about layering that may be helpful:

    https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/layering-basics.html

  • jamesmburns90
    jamesmburns90 Posts: 10 Member
    Leave earlier for work with a slower pace and then make up for it on the way home?
  • rbiss
    rbiss Posts: 422 Member
    lorrpb wrote: »
    Wear wicking shirts like a running shirt or other technical shirt. They come in short and long sleeves depending on the weather. This will keep you more comfortable. Layer polartec fleece over it in colder weather. Use a top layer that's water proof or windproof when needed. Wear layers that zip open half way if not all the way so you can "vent" your body heat. It's amazing how much more comfortable you can be just by letting some of the warm air escape. Some shirts and jackets have underarm vents/zips that can be helpful. If you don't already have such clothing, you can pick some up at Goodwill or other thrift store. It might require checking back a few times because stock rotates quickly.

    You could also consider looking for a different pack. Look for a hiking day pack with a mesh panel on the back or a lumbar pack that doesn't sit on your shoulders.

    Happy walking!

    ^ This I wear a wicking shirt under my work shirts to help with sweat and polar fleece is great.
  • 35dollars
    35dollars Posts: 828 Member
    edited September 2017
    I don't think there's a perfect solution, but some backpacks have raised bulges on the area where they meet your back. which allows air to circulate between you and the bag.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,653 Member
    edited September 2017
    Some better clothing/layering might help a little, but ultimately you're probably just going to keep sweating. Packing a change of clothes and a jacket shouldn't be a problem. If it were me, I'd probably look at a better backpack and a jacket that will pack smaller/easier, and just assume that I'm going to have to change clothes every day.
  • cs2thecox
    cs2thecox Posts: 533 Member
    I did a walking marathon a few years ago, so I did a whole LOT of walking training, including to and from work (7 miles one way...).

    1) I always, always put on a clean shirt for work. I'd never walk in my work shirt, not least because it gets crumpled by the straps as well as sweaty. I stashed more clothes than normal at work - in terms of jackets, cardigans, scarves etc - so I only had to carry the top for that day, which really doesn't take up much space. I took the clothes in on a non-walking day when I was taking public transport instead of walking, and then only had to deal with them when I wanted to change them over every so often.

    2) Find a good backpack that works for you. After a lot of research and soul searching, I bought an Osprey Talon 22. I still adore it, and it's still my go to pack for hiking and sometimes weekends away. (The women's version didn't exist when I got mine, but there's now a Tempest 20.) I really wanted zipped pockets on the hip belt, along with about a 20l capacity (so I can't overpack it and make it heavy!) so that was what I focussed my search on. I find it much less sweaty than my other more casual backpacks. I think lightweight hiking specific packs are the way to go.

    3) Technical clothes are your friend. Gym clothes, running clothes, those sorts of things. A zipped neck helps a lot with venting as others have said. In the winter I loved long sleeve tops with thumb holes to keep my hands a bit warm without needing to wear gloves. I found a lot of good things in TK Maxx (UK equivalent of TJ Maxx - I have no idea why they use a different letter!), particularly if you're not too fussy about colours. My very, very favourite top was like this but neon yellow! It was brushed and fluffy on the inside, and had a double layer of fabric over the front and shoulders to help with being a bit windproof where you need it:
    https://store.nike.com/us/en_us/pd/therma-sphere-element-womens-long-sleeve-running-top/pid-11533155/pgid-11882682

    Keep it up!!
  • lilac_bunny
    lilac_bunny Posts: 137 Member
    Can you not just leave a weeks worth of clothes at work on a Monday so you only need the backpack once a week to work and once back?