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10,000 Steps In Addition To Regular Exercise

IsabeausRoseIsabeausRose Member Posts: 129 Member Member Posts: 129 Member
I apologize ahead of time for not having links to back myself up but I'm on my phone. I've been reading articles online about this 10,000 steps a day theory and found out that it doesn't count towards the daily exercise we are supposed to get. It's just how active we are supposed to be in general. So our daily aerobic activity and regular strength training are supposed to be IN ADDITION to the 10,000 daily steps. This is quite a lot of movement every day. I'd like some educated opinions on this and to be corrected if what I read was wrong.
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Replies

  • Noreenmarie1234Noreenmarie1234 Member Posts: 6,858 Member Member Posts: 6,858 Member
    I wish I was this active. I rarely get 10k steps more than a few days of the week when I exercise :(
  • LillysMomma09LillysMomma09 Member Posts: 272 Member Member Posts: 272 Member
    If you walk more then 10 minutes most fitbits will auto recognize that as active minutes. So it will add to your active time and add to your steps. At least my charge HR does. :smile:
  • SonyaCeleSonyaCele Member Posts: 2,842 Member Member Posts: 2,842 Member
    i would not have the time or energy to do 10K steps AND cardio/strength. I don't even have time to get 10K. Who do they think has all this time?


  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,669 Member Member Posts: 39,669 Member
    There's nothing hard and fast about 10,000 steps...there's nothing scientific about it...pedometers sold in Japan in the 1960s were marketed under the name "manpo-kei," which translates to "10,000 steps meter.

    It's a reasonably good guideline to get you moving...don't know what articles you're reading, but 10,000 steps per day would be considered active.

    Personally, I could care less about steps...I care about being active...I cycle 50+ miles per week and I'm pretty lean, healthy, and fit. I have a desk job so no way I'm getting in 10K steps...I'm better served to spend the time I can be active doing something a bit more intense than walking around.
  • lorrpblorrpb Member Posts: 11,465 Member Member Posts: 11,465 Member
    The more you move the better, but we each have to do what we can do. I'm not the most fit person among us, but I do aim for 10k steps daily plus strength training, or swimming 4-5x week. I count running towards my step goal but no extra calories.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Member Posts: 39,669 Member Member Posts: 39,669 Member
    lizery wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    There's nothing hard and fast about 10,000 steps...there's nothing scientific about it...pedometers sold in Japan in the 1960s were marketed under the name "manpo-kei," which translates to "10,000 steps meter.

    It's a reasonably good guideline to get you moving...don't know what articles you're reading, but 10,000 steps per day would be considered active.

    Personally, I could care less about steps...I care about being active...I cycle 50+ miles per week and I'm pretty lean, healthy, and fit. I have a desk job so no way I'm getting in 10K steps...I'm better served to spend the time I can be active doing something a bit more intense than walking around.

    While there's nothing hard and fast about it, the reason they were sold in Japan under that name was because as people were becoming more sedentary and weight was and increasing problem some Japanese scientist had the hypotheses that by increasing activity in the average person from 4000 to 10000 steps/day would decrease obesity and related jazz thus being a simple and effective public health preventative strategy.

    Modern 100000 step rhetoric stems from this Japanese experiment.

    Yeah, that's why I said it's a good guideline for moving more...but I think a lot of people get hung up on "they have to be steps"...I'm far better off spending that kind of time on my bike from an overall fitness standpoint.

    Basically, just move more...
  • fittocyclefittocycle Member Posts: 810 Member Member Posts: 810 Member
    There was a study done in Scotland (I believe it was Scotland) invoking mail carriers. The mail carriers who walked at least 14-15,000 steps a day had the least amount of health issues. I'm assuming they walked their routes unlike those in the US.
    Regardless of the number, the more movement we get and the less we sit, the better!
  • crackpotbabycrackpotbaby Member Posts: 1,297 Member Member Posts: 1,297 Member
    @cwolfman absolutely agree re 'just moving more'.

    Even the heart foundation & world health organisation ect suggest 10000 as 'optimum' but stress that other activities including cycling, swimming, strength training are all necessary; walking steps is not the be all and end all.

    Personally I think for largely inactive people though, a numerical target (10000 or whatever) is a great motivator to get people moving. Particularly in populations that may not have resources to deliberately 'work out'.



  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 10,682 Member Member Posts: 10,682 Member
    The more exercise I get, the fewer steps. If I'm walking in not cycling, swimming, or lifting.
  • AmandaDanceMoreAmandaDanceMore Member Posts: 298 Member Member Posts: 298 Member
    When I wore a Fitbit, 10k was a pretty basic number for me. I typically walk my dogs 2 miles a day, at least (that, in and of itself comes to a bit over 6k in steps), and the rest I easily got just going about my day. I work a full time job that can keep me busy and on my feet (not always, but I have easily put 8k on a Fitbit at work on many occasions). I usually could still find time to do something else, though I didn't always necessarily do it.

    Of course, some people just find walking super super boring, while I generally love it. That could be why I always found it very easy to hit that 10k mark most days, and easily surpass it. I'd be that person who would choose to walk a mile somewhere rather than get in the car and drive there.

    FWIW, I no longer wear a Fitbit. I found it didn't necessarily change my habits at all (I was either going to be lazy or not), and the challenges drove me up the wall, especially when I would make the mistake of joining a weekend one and had to work- when people spend half their day on a treadmill on a Saturday just to win a stupid Fitbit challenge while you're stuck it work and then you get harassed because you're not able to keep up with them, you start to realize that little device is more annoying than its worth.
  • cs2thecoxcs2thecox Member, Premium Posts: 533 Member Member, Premium Posts: 533 Member
    I thought 10k had been fairly well debunked as being rather arbitrary, and basically a nice round number for marketing purposes with limited scientific proof as to this being the holy grail.

    A bit like 2,000 calories for women and 2,500 calories for men. (There are sure to be more exceptions than people for whom this is actually right!)

    And 5 fruit and veg a day. (Isn't it more like 10, but they thought that would scare people so they went down to 5...)

    The UK goverment guideline doesn't currently mention steps...
    To stay healthy, adults aged 19-64 should try to be active daily and should do:
    •at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity such as cycling or brisk walking every week, and.
    •strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

    OR

    •75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, such as running or a game of singles tennis every week, and
    •strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

    OR

    •A mix of moderate and vigorous aerobic activity every week. For example, two 30-minute runs plus 30 minutes of brisk walking equates to 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity, and
    •strength exercises on two or more days a week that work all the major muscles (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders and arms)

    Source: http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/fitness/Pages/physical-activity-guidelines-for-adults.aspx
  • TavistockToadTavistockToad Member Posts: 35,741 Member Member Posts: 35,741 Member
    i get around 6000 steps on a normal work day, before any meaningful exercise. i also work out 5 x a week, running or biking, and a bit of walking, so i figure i am active enough!
  • mer55mer55 Member, Premium Posts: 28 Member Member, Premium Posts: 28 Member
    I wore a fitbit 2 days ago while I golfed 18 holes and walked, pulling my clubs. My FB registered 10.999 steps! However, when I synced it to my MFP, it only gave me credit for 200 calories!! FB obviously doesn't pick up the way I golf!! When I put golf in MFP manually, walking and duration, it credited me with 800+ calories! However, FB did do a manual adjust and took the 200 calories back! So, I use FB just to track my steps on days I am not actually doing physical exercise and do just walking. Otherwise, I enter the exercise manually on MFP.
  • TavistockToadTavistockToad Member Posts: 35,741 Member Member Posts: 35,741 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »

    Basically, just move more...

    QFT!
  • Machka9Machka9 Member Posts: 19,701 Member Member Posts: 19,701 Member
    Last October, I participated in a step challenge and for the first time I counted steps. Turns out I was getting 10,000 steps a day without even trying.

    When I included what I count as exercise, my "step count" went way up!

    So I get 10,000 steps + walking more, climbing many flights of stairs, cycling long distances, taking spinning classes, rowing at the gym, weightlifting now and then, etc.
    edited September 2017
  • IsabeausRoseIsabeausRose Member Posts: 129 Member Member Posts: 129 Member
    I took the 10,000 steps plus regular exercise as a challenge yesterday and walked 5 miles to get the 10,000 in and then did an hour of circuit training after and found the walking relaxed my muscles and actually fueled my workout and made me stronger. I felt great! But I found I needed to replenish with a banana after when I never usually eat back my calories. I could have eaten a house and usually normal exercise suppresses my appetite. MFP calculated I burned 1,000 calories from exercise yesterday so that's probably why my body was so depleted. I'm going to do the same thing today but do yoga instead of the circuit training. I like to rotate. If I'm going to be this intense on a regular basis I need to make sure I take two rest days a week.
  • TavistockToadTavistockToad Member Posts: 35,741 Member Member Posts: 35,741 Member
    I took the 10,000 steps plus regular exercise as a challenge yesterday and walked 5 miles to get the 10,000 in and then did an hour of circuit training after and found the walking relaxed my muscles and actually fueled my workout and made me stronger. I felt great! But I found I needed to replenish with a banana after when I never usually eat back my calories. I could have eaten a house and usually normal exercise suppresses my appetite. MFP calculated I burned 1,000 calories from exercise yesterday so that's probably why my body was so depleted. I'm going to do the same thing today but do yoga instead of the circuit training. I like to rotate. If I'm going to be this intense on a regular basis I need to make sure I take two rest days a week.

    why would you not eat exercise cals back?

    if you don't want to then use a TDEE calculation not MFP...
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