Weight loss without working out due to medical reasons--anyone else?

Zara11
Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
edited October 2017 in Health and Weight Loss
Hi all! For medical reasons I cannot work out. Anyone else doing this on diet alone? Would love to meet some people in a similar boat.

EDIT: I know how to work out, I know all about calorie deficits. I am looking for people who deal with physical limitations because weight loss is often more difficult when you also can't work out and it's nice to connect with people who understand the frustrations/added mental stress.
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Replies

  • Ready2Rock206
    Ready2Rock206 Posts: 9,490 Member
    Sure - all you need is a calorie deficit. I lost 40 lbs before not doing any exercise.
  • kristen8000
    kristen8000 Posts: 747 Member
    Lost 16lbs since July 31st without exercise. Not because I can't, just because I didn't want to.
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    edited October 2017
    Moving is good for you and usually attainable unless you're paralyzed. You don't have to call it exercise for it to have an effect. Can you walk? Dance? Play? Housework?
  • kristen8000
    kristen8000 Posts: 747 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose. There is, however, a psychological difference between not wanting to work out and not being able to work out, which is a frustrating element in this that I'd like to find a support group for.

    But I only had 16lbs to lose. I started at 162, I'm currently 146lbs and 5'11. And almost 40. Weight loss with diet only works. No matter how able you are. So, what I'm saying is, no one NEEDS to exercise to lose weight. Eat less food. Period.

    Good luck and I hope you find the support you are looking for.

  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose.
    A calorie deficit always causes weight loss, it's what causes weight loss. The last pounds are slower, not harder.
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose.
    A calorie deficit always causes weight loss, it's what causes weight loss. The last pounds are slower, not harder.

    Not when you eat foods you have an intolerance or allergy to. Also, some medications mess with weight loss as well.
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose. There is, however, a psychological difference between not wanting to work out and not being able to work out, which is a frustrating element in this that I'd like to find a support group for.

    But I only had 16lbs to lose. I started at 162, I'm currently 146lbs and 5'11. And almost 40. Weight loss with diet only works. No matter how able you are. So, what I'm saying is, no one NEEDS to exercise to lose weight. Eat less food. Period.

    Good luck and I hope you find the support you are looking for.

    Yes, I'm aware of that. I didn't say it was impossible. Knocked out the first 10+ pounds on calorie deficit alone already. I said it was getting more difficult and emotionally taxing given health issues and was looking for others in the same boat.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,086 MFP Moderator
    edited October 2017
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    Moving is good for you and usually attainable unless you're paralyzed. You don't have to call it exercise for it to have an effect. Can you walk? Dance? Play? Housework?

    Muscle/nerve issues. Limited movement. Most effort goes to maintaining job and standard chores. I already do housework, play/walk/dancing difficult to push boundaries on. I was pretty fit before this started.
  • sardelsa
    sardelsa Posts: 9,826 Member
    When you say you have less weight to lose, are these vanity lbs or lbs to get to normal weight? If they are vanity lbs, and you can't workout right now, is there an option for you to maintain until you can workout again? (just so you can maintain your muscle/body composition)

    If working out is off the table for good or you are trying to get to a normal weight for health reasons, then obviously that will not be an option.

    It will totally depend on your goals of course. All the best!
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?

    Thank you for your response. I'm trying to do that because a hundred calories is better than zero, but am limited in what I can do. Waiting for a few medical procedures to be completed so I can try if focusing on core work will cause less repercussions.
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,086 MFP Moderator
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?

    Thank you for your response. I'm trying to do that because a hundred calories is better than zero, but am limited in what I can do. Waiting for a few medical procedures to be completed so I can try if focusing on core work will cause less repercussions.

    What are your stats? How many calories are you eating? And do you use a food scale?
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose.
    A calorie deficit always causes weight loss, it's what causes weight loss. The last pounds are slower, not harder.
    Not when you eat foods you have an intolerance or allergy to. Also, some medications mess with weight loss as well.
    Why would you eat food you are allergic to? Not that it hinders weight loss. Some medications can mess with appetite and cause lethargy, but they can't directly hinder weight loss.
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?

    Thank you for your response. I'm trying to do that because a hundred calories is better than zero, but am limited in what I can do. Waiting for a few medical procedures to be completed so I can try if focusing on core work will cause less repercussions.

    What are your stats? How many calories are you eating? And do you use a food scale?

    5'8", 145-150, aiming for 135-140, eating 1200-1700, averaging 1400-1500 most days, and I weigh meats eaten, and guess with fruits/vegetables.
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose.
    A calorie deficit always causes weight loss, it's what causes weight loss. The last pounds are slower, not harder.
    Not when you eat foods you have an intolerance or allergy to. Also, some medications mess with weight loss as well.
    Why would you eat food you are allergic to? Not that it hinders weight loss. Some medications can mess with appetite and cause lethargy, but they can't directly hinder weight loss.

    I cut them out when it was discovered. I was just pointing out that a calorie deficit does not always cause weight loss. It does when everything else is working correctly.
  • KayTeeOne
    KayTeeOne Posts: 123 Member
    I am doing the same. Feel free to add me. Have to lose almost 25 lbs
  • psuLemon
    psuLemon Posts: 38,086 MFP Moderator
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?

    Thank you for your response. I'm trying to do that because a hundred calories is better than zero, but am limited in what I can do. Waiting for a few medical procedures to be completed so I can try if focusing on core work will cause less repercussions.

    What are your stats? How many calories are you eating? And do you use a food scale?

    5'8", 145-150, aiming for 135-140, eating 1200-1700, averaging 1400-1500 most days, and I weigh meats eaten, and guess with fruits/vegetables.

    Id start to weigh you fruits/veggies. I used to think I was eating an 80 calorie apple.. turns out, it was double. And when you eat 4 to 5 servings of fruit a day, it was astonishing how far off I was.

    So I am lean myself, and trying to get abs has been a bish for me.
  • Zara11
    Zara11 Posts: 1,247 Member
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    psuLemon wrote: »
    The problem with being lean is that it's harder to create a deficit because you have less room for error. Even trained professionals uncount calories in by as much as 400 calories. So there is a need to be more precise. Also, with some medications, it can mess with some water retention and/or hunger signals.

    It's true that all you need is a calorie deficit. The harder part is, when someone is lean, it's harder to do so and in some sense, our bodies become more resistant.

    I know you said you can't workout, but can you increase daily movements (maybe walk more)?

    Thank you for your response. I'm trying to do that because a hundred calories is better than zero, but am limited in what I can do. Waiting for a few medical procedures to be completed so I can try if focusing on core work will cause less repercussions.

    What are your stats? How many calories are you eating? And do you use a food scale?

    5'8", 145-150, aiming for 135-140, eating 1200-1700, averaging 1400-1500 most days, and I weigh meats eaten, and guess with fruits/vegetables.

    Id start to weigh you fruits/veggies. I used to think I was eating an 80 calorie apple.. turns out, it was double. And when you eat 4 to 5 servings of fruit a day, it was astonishing how far off I was.

    So I am lean myself, and trying to get abs has been a bish for me.

    If it's of any help, when I could work out, got my abs from heavier weights, swimming, and p90x was pretty darn useful as well!
  • kommodevaran
    kommodevaran Posts: 17,890 Member
    Zara11 wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    Zara11 wrote: »
    I agree that a calorie deficit usually causes weight loss, but it gets harder when there's less weight to lose.
    A calorie deficit always causes weight loss, it's what causes weight loss. The last pounds are slower, not harder.
    Not when you eat foods you have an intolerance or allergy to. Also, some medications mess with weight loss as well.
    Why would you eat food you are allergic to? Not that it hinders weight loss. Some medications can mess with appetite and cause lethargy, but they can't directly hinder weight loss.

    I cut them out when it was discovered.
    Then what's the relevance?
    I was just pointing out that a calorie deficit does not always cause weight loss. It does when everything else is working correctly.
    But it's not true. A calorie deficit means that you're taking in fewer calories than your body burns. This forces your body to eat on it's energy (fat) stores, and you lose weight. It happens for everybody, always.