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Regain after Gastric Bypass

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  • try2again
    try2again Posts: 3,562 Member
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    aeloine wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    jnmalsch wrote: »
    at the time I was eating about 1000 calories a day. when I asked my nutritionist she said to cut it back down to 800 and that got disheartening. I know your metabolism slows way down right after surgery but can you bump it back up I don't even have a clue what calories range I should be in. Right now I am trying to hit the 1000 calorie mark again.

    I hate to be a bother, but I have another question. I am another person with no experience with WLS, but I saw this original comment and a subsequent one that recommended getting back to a VLCD. Is there a medical reason for this... something specifically about having been a surgery patient that now requires a VLCD for weight loss, regardless of the time since surgery and a person's current weight/eating habits/calorie intake? It sounds like the OP has regained the way we all gain weight- eating too many calories- and it doesn't sound like she is observing any huge restrictions. That being the case, wouldn't a modest calorie deficit work the same for her as it would for anyone?

    Not if she's still within a certain timeframe of her WLS, is my understanding.

    OK... but why?
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,268 Member
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    jyamiolk wrote: »
    I am three years out from WLS (Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy) I originally weighed 302 at my highest and had High blood pressure, diabetes, Sleep apnea, etc. To date I have lost 120 pounds and have been able to maintain my weight for over 2+ years now. Success is not only with the tool but a good support group, team of doctors, nutritionists and also psychological counseling as for some people obesity is a disease and needs to be dealt with on many levels. With my group we are patients for life. They provide yearly visits and lab work to make sure we are on track and maintaining our health, there are monthly support groups and a great mentoring program. I am eating around 2300 calories a day to maintain. Yes, CICO works but there are a number of other factors that play into successful weight loss and maintenance. Since my surgery and weight loss I no longer am diabetic, blood pressure is normal and I have a new lease on life. People have a tendency to say that WLS is the easy way out but it is far from that.

    I have to admit that I often thought it was "the easy way out" until family and friends did it...

    now I am in the camp that knows better...and I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy to be honest...esp with what I see happening and I am not talking about weight gain either...
  • aeloine
    aeloine Posts: 2,163 Member
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    try2again wrote: »
    aeloine wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    jnmalsch wrote: »
    at the time I was eating about 1000 calories a day. when I asked my nutritionist she said to cut it back down to 800 and that got disheartening. I know your metabolism slows way down right after surgery but can you bump it back up I don't even have a clue what calories range I should be in. Right now I am trying to hit the 1000 calorie mark again.

    I hate to be a bother, but I have another question. I am another person with no experience with WLS, but I saw this original comment and a subsequent one that recommended getting back to a VLCD. Is there a medical reason for this... something specifically about having been a surgery patient that now requires a VLCD for weight loss, regardless of the time since surgery and a person's current weight/eating habits/calorie intake? It sounds like the OP has regained the way we all gain weight- eating too many calories- and it doesn't sound like she is observing any huge restrictions. That being the case, wouldn't a modest calorie deficit work the same for her as it would for anyone?

    Not if she's still within a certain timeframe of her WLS, is my understanding.

    OK... but why?

    Something about reduced calorie/nutrient absorption? I'm hesitant to say, but maybe adaptive thermogenesis? If you CAN'T eat more for YEARS, you get used to functioning on less or some such?

    Science side of MFP, help me out?
  • SezxyStef
    SezxyStef Posts: 15,268 Member
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    aeloine wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    aeloine wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    jnmalsch wrote: »
    at the time I was eating about 1000 calories a day. when I asked my nutritionist she said to cut it back down to 800 and that got disheartening. I know your metabolism slows way down right after surgery but can you bump it back up I don't even have a clue what calories range I should be in. Right now I am trying to hit the 1000 calorie mark again.

    I hate to be a bother, but I have another question. I am another person with no experience with WLS, but I saw this original comment and a subsequent one that recommended getting back to a VLCD. Is there a medical reason for this... something specifically about having been a surgery patient that now requires a VLCD for weight loss, regardless of the time since surgery and a person's current weight/eating habits/calorie intake? It sounds like the OP has regained the way we all gain weight- eating too many calories- and it doesn't sound like she is observing any huge restrictions. That being the case, wouldn't a modest calorie deficit work the same for her as it would for anyone?

    Not if she's still within a certain timeframe of her WLS, is my understanding.

    OK... but why?

    Something about reduced calorie/nutrient absorption? I'm hesitant to say, but maybe adaptive thermogenesis? If you CAN'T eat more for YEARS, you get used to functioning on less or some such?

    Science side of MFP, help me out?

    no she wouldn't gain on that...there is reduced nutrient absorption but calories are not the same.

    Calories are a unit of measure basically how much "energy" a single calorie will produce is that...and having WLS doesn't make that any different.

    The issue is (based on my experience) is that during the start of life after WLS you are limited to what you can eat...so VLCD with multivitamins etc to make up for what you can't eat...so yah you are losing weight not just fat...weight...so bye bye muscle too..so that will make you so you don't need as many calories as you used to of course and as a formerly obese person with WLS you will require less calories than a person your current weight that has never been obese...

  • rheddmobile
    rheddmobile Posts: 6,840 Member
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    So, to summarize based on various replies to my question, the OP is not losing on 1000 calories a day presently because she isn't eating 1000 calories a day - she isn't logging accurately and is probably eating far more than that.

    That makes sense - I have several friends who have had wls and there's nothing magical about it that makes it impossible to lose weight except on a vlcd.

    All but one of my friends has regained, and they regained the same way they gained originally, by eating an alarmingly large number of calories. It takes a little more effort to consume that many calories with a stomach the size of an egg, but it can be done - one of my friends makes mashed potatoes which are more alouette garlic spread, heavy cream, and cheese, than potato. And pie, she serves more than one kind of pie with every meal. So much rich food does give her extreme digestive trouble but apparently it's worth it to her on some level. Her surgery had serious complications and she was in intensive care for more than a month, which makes it bewildering to me why she would try so hard to make the whole endeavor pointless. Others on this thread have complained about wls patients being characterized as "lazy" - well, I know for a fact she is not lazy, I've worked with her and she is smart, conscientious, and hard working. She just eats way, way too much food in a way that I can't easily understand when viewing her behavior from the outside.
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,464 Member
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    The weight loss clinic here in Alberta, Canada, are world class and publicly funded. I bet their success rate is right up there.

    http://www.drsharma.ca
  • try2again
    try2again Posts: 3,562 Member
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    jyamiolk wrote: »
    People have a tendency to say that WLS is the easy way out but it is far from that.

    I've never thought of WLS as being the easy way out... just the opposite, actually. To me, it's always sounded like a very demanding route that would only work for a very special kind of person. I'm definitely not that person.
  • try2again
    try2again Posts: 3,562 Member
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    I don't know if anyone is still around in this thread that is willing to field questions, but I just wanted to clarify something. After WLS, will a person's maintenance calories and/or meal sizes forever be reduced from what they otherwise would have been able to eat having lost weight in the traditional way?
  • mph323
    mph323 Posts: 3,565 Member
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    try2again wrote: »
    I don't know if anyone is still around in this thread that is willing to field questions, but I just wanted to clarify something. After WLS, will a person's maintenance calories and/or meal sizes forever be reduced from what they otherwise would have been able to eat having lost weight in the traditional way?

    If you go back to page 1, Quasita gives a comprehensive explanation of the process including calorie requirements.
  • try2again
    try2again Posts: 3,562 Member
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    mph323 wrote: »
    try2again wrote: »
    I don't know if anyone is still around in this thread that is willing to field questions, but I just wanted to clarify something. After WLS, will a person's maintenance calories and/or meal sizes forever be reduced from what they otherwise would have been able to eat having lost weight in the traditional way?

    If you go back to page 1, Quasita gives a comprehensive explanation of the process including calorie requirements.

    Thank you- I did go back & reread that. It was a lot to remember.
  • LiftHeavyThings27105
    LiftHeavyThings27105 Posts: 2,086 Member
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    Wow! I have skimmed this post as I am very very VERY interested.

    I have known several people who have done this. All were women (not important, just providing details) and all were 350lbs to 400lbs and all consumed enormous amounts of food and alcohol (so, the concept of CICO was not their friend before surgery). They all had gastric bypass and within two years they all gained every bit of the weight back. And then some.

    From what I understand that is "typical" (according to gastric bypass data). What I "know" from these folks is that they did not change their habits one ioata.

    So, it seemed like - and just being honest here - they used the surgery as an excuse. It was very frustrating to see them continue down the same path that put them in the condition they had and even more difficult to hear them wonder outloud why they were gaining all of their weight back. It was challenging not to state the obvious (or what appears to be the obvious). And, all of this was at least a decade ago, so I do not remember all of the details as to what type of surgery they had. I do very clearly remember "gastric bypass" being used.

    Anyway, I am going to dig into this post. Gonna educate myself on this a WHOLE LOT more.

    So, @Quasita - thank you for putting your experience (and yourself) out there. I think that people tend to make a lot of assumptions (like I try not to do, but still do - at times). I also would like to commend you for not 'being sensitive' on this topic. I truly believe that there is a lot of ignorance on this topic (shoot, put me at the top of that list!). Thanks to your awesome post I am fixing to change that (well, as much as my noggin can handle).
  • jnmalsch
    jnmalsch Posts: 21 Member
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    jnmalsch wrote: »
    at the time I was eating about 1000 calories a day. when I asked my nutritionist she said to cut it back down to 800 and that got disheartening. I know your metabolism slows way down right after surgery but can you bump it back up I don't even have a clue what calories range I should be in. Right now I am trying to hit the 1000 calorie mark again.

    This thread has gotten far from the original post - no one seems to have addressed this. Why is the OP not losing at 1000 calories a day? That seems very unlikely, but it seems the nutritionist believes her.

    this is me getting back on track. I was eating crap before I decided enough was enough
  • jnmalsch
    jnmalsch Posts: 21 Member
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    kshama2001 wrote: »
    jnmalsch wrote: »
    at the time I was eating about 1000 calories a day. when I asked my nutritionist she said to cut it back down to 800 and that got disheartening. I know your metabolism slows way down right after surgery but can you bump it back up I don't even have a clue what calories range I should be in. Right now I am trying to hit the 1000 calorie mark again.

    This thread has gotten far from the original post - no one seems to have addressed this. Why is the OP not losing at 1000 calories a day? That seems very unlikely, but it seems the nutritionist believes her.

    Good point. The OP's diary is open.

    @jnmalsch for yesterday's frittata, soup, and cabbage rolls - did you put them in the recipe builder yourself?

    Yes I put them in the recipe builder.

    My frittata was 10 eggs, 1 zuchinni, 1 carrot and 1/2 onions. cut into 10 pieces
    My soup was homemade bone broth with weighed chicken breast, 2 carrots and 1 piece of celery
    my unstuffed cabbage rolls were 1 pound of ground beef, 20oz crushed tomatos, 1/2 head of cabbage, 1/2 onion, and measured into portions.
  • jnmalsch
    jnmalsch Posts: 21 Member
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    jyamiolk wrote: »
    I am three years out from WLS (Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy) I originally weighed 302 at my highest and had High blood pressure, diabetes, Sleep apnea, etc. To date I have lost 120 pounds and have been able to maintain my weight for over 2+ years now. Success is not only with the tool but a good support group, team of doctors, nutritionists and also psychological counseling as for some people obesity is a disease and needs to be dealt with on many levels. With my group we are patients for life. ....

    This is a big mess up of mine and I wish I could get back. I was doing so good when I was in support group. But I was a single mom and had no babysitter and couldn't end up going. Then when I started to gain I reached out the the gastric bypass therapist that came to support groups once every 3 months and my insurance didn't cover her and they wouldn't let me pay cash to see her. I stopped going to the Dr and getting bloodwork because I lost my job and with that insurance. so in addition to the bad eating habits I picked up, the dating and going out. I had that other side and pretty much gave up on the surgery all together. I wish I could go back. I wish I could fix my mistakes but I cant be the only one

  • jyamiolk
    jyamiolk Posts: 37 Member
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    jnmalsch I am sorry to hear you had such issue with the after care. Don't give up. Use MFP as a tool to get back on track. Either configure MFP to your stats and use the recommended calorie goal or find your TDEE and work to stay at that number. When you fall off the wagon it is challenging to get back on but not impossible. Start with a sustainable plan and work toward small goals in the weight loss.
  • lois1231
    lois1231 Posts: 331 Member
    edited February 2018
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    I had gastric bypass in 2001 and no the surgery is not magic. I collapsed both lungs after and almost died. Spent 10 days in the hospital. I lost 72 pounds and regained every bit with reinforcements to my highest ever weight of 317 pounds then lost back down to 220 with the help of a nutritionist and regained it over the years. I had therapy to address my eating issues. I went faithfully to all the support groups but despite all that I had a hard time not grazing. The smallest amount of meat makes me ill. It was much easier to eat food which wouldn't make me vomit. I ended up with chronic ulcers, esophagus problems and most of my teeth ended up destroyed from the constant vomiting. I had an esophageal hernia repair caused by the surgery repaired in 2015 and basically they redid the surgery. Would I do it again. I don't know. I would probably try harder with the aid of my fitness pal first. I had to lose the weight in order to get my knees replaced. I walk without pain today in my knees after wearing two braces and gulping down pain meds for many years. The knee replacements are going strong after 17 years. I had lost over 100 pounds on my own before but I was much younger than. Anyway I am back working on getting healthy.
  • islandantoinette
    islandantoinette Posts: 4 Member
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    I am getting prepared for my gastric by pass. mainly due to Diabetes, crumbling vertebrae, high bp, leg pain from varicose veins, haitial hernia wt is as 267 shocking and appalling to me. I have been dieting, exercising and fasting my whole life. Reading this whole thread (4 pages) has really scared me. But I have to get this done because of all the physical ailments I have. However this has certainly thrown a whole new view on things. This is the only thread I have read in "My Fittness Pal" I don't even know where to go from here. Antoinette Jackson age 63