Scary encounter with a chocolate cake

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Replies

  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    I heard an interesting suggestion the other day.

    If you're craving something try to delay eating it till tomorrow. Then if you still must have it have it.

    Not sure how this would work for everyone.... But i find it hel as I'm not denying myself, just delaying it till tomorrow. Then if you don't need to eat it tomorrow you don't have it.

    Anyone else tried this??

    That would have worked really well in this case. I have 4 kids. The cake was gone by last night. When I had the desire to binge on it Sunday, there was still over half of it left. That would have been some serious calories. Last night I had a sliver of Dutch apple pie. It was good, but I did not feel the desire to binge like I did with the cake.

    I think @HellYeahItsKriss is on to something about eating such a small amount being a trigger. It was just registering with me how really good it was as I finished it. Here is an interesting add on to that thought - it might not have been as "amazing, to die for" as I think if I had a few more bites; it was definitely good but it became legendary in my mind from a sample that was gone before my taste buds got the full effect.
  • dailyzey
    dailyzey Posts: 82 Member
    I heard an interesting suggestion the other day.

    If you're craving something try to delay eating it till tomorrow. Then if you still must have it have it.

    Not sure how this would work for everyone.... But i find it hel as I'm not denying myself, just delaying it till tomorrow. Then if you don't need to eat it tomorrow you don't have it.

    Anyone else tried this??

    yes! I do this all the time. Especially at night, if i really want to eat cookies or something, i'll tell myself, if I really want it that bad, i will save it for breakfast. Then I don't feel like i'm depriving myself. Of course when morning comes, i only want to eat my usual breakfast, not cookies or cake. My willpower is definitely stronger in the morning.
    Another trick I use is to make ahead sugar free jello cups. Those are only 10-20 cal or so per cup. I know they are not very healthy due to the fake sugar but better eat that than a 100 cal desert and the jello really fills me up for some reason.
  • niskmom
    niskmom Posts: 32 Member
    Following- lots of good advice
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    edited November 2017
    I think I now have two known triggers:
    https://www.pepperidgefarm.com/product/chocolate-fudge-layer-cake/
    http://petdairy.com/products/ice-cream/ice-cream-cartons/pet-chocolate-moose-tracks

    I like chocolate fudge. :)

    There are a bunch of other things I have binged on, but the urge came first and then I found something. But those two items have both caused me to want to finish off the entire cake/package after having a small amount. Defeating temptations is all well and good, but I think I should not eat these foods ever again or at the very least not before I get below goal and maintain it for quite some time.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    edited November 2017
    I do better when I save calories for larger portions of some things that are trigger items for me, like breakfast cereal.

    Other items, I do okay with moderating single serving packaging.

    The biggest key for me has been not having an over aggressive deficit and doing weekend maintenance days, which allow me room in my calorie budge for those larger portion indulgences.

    I just wanted to add that food items I've eaten with abandon over my life run the spectrum, macro-wise. I've gone to town on everything from cookies to cottage cheese to nuts to peanut butter.
  • EliseTK1
    EliseTK1 Posts: 440 Member
    This happens to me almost exclusively with sweets. (I'm also unable to control myself with rotisserie chicken, but I tend to feel much better after a protein binge.)

    I did really well after forcing myself to give up sugary foods for a few weeks. I stopped craving them completely. On Thanksgiving I ate dessert not because I really wanted it, but because it was tradition and my hubby and I had a bit of a competition going with what we prepared. I ended up eating a fair amount, and of course we had tons of leftovers the next day, so I ate a bit more. Then we went out to celebrate our anniversary, and we had more sweets. By Sunday when we got back, I was reaching for some Oreos before I knew it. (I use them as marathon fuel, otherwise those little devils wouldn't be anywhere near my house.) I realized the sugar addiction had kicked in again, and my best defense was to put back the cookies and practice reaching for healthier options.

    Some people do really well with the "I'll just have a small portion" practice, and others don't. Maybe over time you can teach yourself to consistently resist the cravings or to be satisfied with a normal portion, and maybe you'll find it's easier to just avoid the trigger foods. Just know that you're not alone, and you're perfectly normal.

    I like the other person's comment about just letting the feeling wash over you and observing it objectively. I'm going to try that.