How Do You Not Hate Running?

As an extremely fat kid with asthma, I struggled so much with running, my PE teacher just let me walk. I guess I developed a complex because even the thought of running gives me anxiety, but I know it’s necessary cardio to look the way that I want. Plus, it’s free! Which is awesome because I’m saving to join a gym.

Could anyone give me any pointers on becoming brave enough to jiggle and lose my breath in public? Also, is it normal to feel tingles in my butt and thighs, and tightness in my chest?
I know it might be a dumb question, but what should it feel like?
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Replies

  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    MISSNYA92 wrote: »
    As an extremely fat kid with asthma, I struggled so much with running, my PE teacher just let me walk. I guess I developed a complex because even the thought of running gives me anxiety, but I know it’s necessary cardio to look the way that I want. Plus, it’s free! Which is awesome because I’m saving to join a gym.

    Could anyone give me any pointers on becoming brave enough to jiggle and lose my breath in public? Also, is it normal to feel tingles in my butt and thighs, and tightness in my chest?
    I know it might be a dumb question, but what should it feel like?

    Running isn't necessary...there are lots of things you can do cardio wise besides running. I tried to force myself to be a runner for quite awhile and always hated it...I turned to cycling and I love it. My wife loves to run...always has. IMO, it's something you either enjoy or not.

    If you do run, I'd recommend just starting with a beginner program like C25K that will ease you into it. Also, as @Tacklewasher noted...make sure you can comfortably walk for 30-60 minutes. I started out doing nothing but walking until I built up to 60 minutes 6x per week and then I moved on to more strenuous exercise.

    Fair point. Running is one option and, while you don't have to buy equipment (bikes get pricey), it does have a cost to it (shoes, clothes etc.) and is not the only option for cardio.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    Start slow.
    Make sure you can comfortably walk for 30 mins to an hour

    DEFINITELY THIS!!!

    BUY GOOD SHOES FROM A RUNNING STORE. Have a gait analysis of some sort done or you risk injury.
    Check reviews online.

    Fleet feet is the gold standard. When it comes time for my biennial new shoe buy(I normally wear the same model for a year or two)... Not the same shoes... 300-500 miles per pair. I'll drive up to two hours to go to Fleet feet.

    Download C25K and follow the program.
    Run slower than you think you should.

    If they have them where you live, Park Run's are free 5K timed runs and are pretty social events. Happen weekly.

  • MISSNYA92
    MISSNYA92 Posts: 36 Member
    Without harping on it, please get proper shoes. From a good running store where they, at least, watch you walk around (treadmill time is better). This really is important for new runners. I'm speaking from experience and I can tell you shin splints are not fun. They can hurt enough to put you off running and can be mostly prevented by the proper shoes.

    I used to work at Nike, so I got some Zoom Pegs for free, as well as FS Elite Runs... I typically just wear them because they’re cute lol, but eventually I want to put them to proper use
  • KombuchaKat
    KombuchaKat Posts: 134 Member
    MISSNYA92 wrote: »
    Wow, you all have given me a lot to think about! I was nervous to post, but I’m really glad I did, and grateful to you for taking the time to answer!
    I’m going to a field by my house this evening to walk... thanks for not being judgy!!!
    I’m new to fitness, and I promised myself to put in sincere effort. I’m going to download this C25k you’ve all mentioned as well. Thanks for the very helpful and insightful advice!

    I would also suggest that you incorporate some kind of weight training routine. It doesn't have to be expensive or complicated. It will balance you out and also strong, toned muscles will help hold you body in the proper posture so that you get the best running stride. I noticed that when I started lifting the running got easier and less painful. C25K is great, good luck!
    Also, my husband is a human gazelle and used to run track. At 41 he is faster than most of the 20 somethings in our Cross Fit gym...he told me that I needed to keep my hands facing forward because I was twisting them from side to side across my body, if that makes sense. I never ran competitively so I never thought about it, but it did help. It was like I was twisting the air right out of my lungs, it will at least help you get a larger breath in.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    MISSNYA92 wrote: »
    Wow, you all have given me a lot to think about! I was nervous to post, but I’m really glad I did, and grateful to you for taking the time to answer!
    I’m going to a field by my house this evening to walk... thanks for not being judgy!!!
    I’m new to fitness, and I promised myself to put in sincere effort. I’m going to download this C25k you’ve all mentioned as well. Thanks for the very helpful and insightful advice!

    I would also suggest that you incorporate some kind of weight training routine. It doesn't have to be expensive or complicated. It will balance you out and also strong, toned muscles will help hold you body in the proper posture so that you get the best running stride. I noticed that when I started lifting the running got easier and less painful. C25K is great, good luck!
    Also, my husband is a human gazelle and used to run track. At 41 he is faster than most of the 20 somethings in our Cross Fit gym...he told me that I needed to keep my hands facing forward because I was twisting them from side to side across my body, if that makes sense. I never ran competitively so I never thought about it, but it did help. It was like I was twisting the air right out of my lungs, it will at least help you get a larger breath in.

    You're also wasting energy laterally that could be used to go forward.
  • steveko89
    steveko89 Posts: 2,187 Member
    I still don't like running empirically, I like the fitness doors that good cardio health and the ability to run distances opens. My wife adores running, doing 5/10k races with her is fun enough to keep my at least cursorily interested. My fitness poison of choice is weightlifting; having good cardio health for strength training is often overlooked.

    Have to agree with all above suggesting to start slowly and set appropriate expectations. May be orth looking at incorporating some cross training options as well; foam rolling or yoga-for-runners videos on youtube will help with soreness and flexibility too (also free). My wife doesn't like it much but having a spin bike was nice when she was rehabbing a hip injury (ran a half marathon following a condensed DIY training plan and inadequate nutrition). Not essential but if you have the space for it you can probably find something someone wants rid of for cheap on craiglist or facebook, whether it be a stationary bike, elliptical, stairmaster or rowing machine. Good option for severe/inclement weather that precludes you from running too.

    If you haven't already, I also suggest finding a running store that can assess your stride and recommend a shoe (or at least a shoe type) that is appropriate for how and where (what surface) you'll be running. That's not to say it's required or that you always have to shop at that store; running has become so popular that there are a number of sites that have a shoe finder (runners' world has a good variety) where once you find a shoe you like you can search for others that are similar. Places like DSW are great for finding last years' model of running shoes at somewhat of a discount too.
  • 4legsRbetterthan2
    4legsRbetterthan2 Posts: 19,494 MFP Moderator
    edited December 2017
    Well, if you don't enjoy running maybe you should check out another avenue? Do some googling, there are all sorts of adult sports leagues out there, you might find something really cool in your area.

    If you still want to give running a go:

    Another vote for go slow, wayyyy slower than you think you should.

    Google running groups in your area and see if there are any. There are probably runners of all different levels so you might be able to find other people to hang with so you aren't alone. And don't be nervous, since I started running I have come to realize runners are the coolest people ever and seem to always be really supportive of newcomers or beginners (in my experience its the idiotic teenagers who like to yell stupid crap out their car window you have to worry about, not that I care what they have to say anyways). My local group does a c25k group starting in january, so maybe yours does something similar. If not, c25k is a great way to start, there are so many free apps that can coach you through that program.

    Since its winter, and presumably cold, dress in layers so you are warm enough to start and can pull stuff off if you heat up.

  • KombuchaKat
    KombuchaKat Posts: 134 Member
    MISSNYA92 wrote: »
    Wow, you all have given me a lot to think about! I was nervous to post, but I’m really glad I did, and grateful to you for taking the time to answer!
    I’m going to a field by my house this evening to walk... thanks for not being judgy!!!
    I’m new to fitness, and I promised myself to put in sincere effort. I’m going to download this C25k you’ve all mentioned as well. Thanks for the very helpful and insightful advice!

    I would also suggest that you incorporate some kind of weight training routine. It doesn't have to be expensive or complicated. It will balance you out and also strong, toned muscles will help hold you body in the proper posture so that you get the best running stride. I noticed that when I started lifting the running got easier and less painful. C25K is great, good luck!
    Also, my husband is a human gazelle and used to run track. At 41 he is faster than most of the 20 somethings in our Cross Fit gym...he told me that I needed to keep my hands facing forward because I was twisting them from side to side across my body, if that makes sense. I never ran competitively so I never thought about it, but it did help. It was like I was twisting the air right out of my lungs, it will at least help you get a larger breath in.

    You're also wasting energy laterally that could be used to go forward.

    I bet I was!
    OP, maybe another suggestion might be to have someone who is experienced in running and proper form actually watch you run and give you suggestions. Like me you might not realize you are doing something detrimental until someone else points it out.