Diabetic desserts with stevia or not?

For Easter I am having my mother in law over who is diabetic. She has been having a really hard time controlling her blood sugars lately and unfortunately, her family is not very supportive when it comes to food. Every get together, which is quite often, they bring pizza, cake, soda, cookies, bread, and every other terrible thing for her. She in turn eats whenever is brought, and I realize it's her choice, but I know how hard it is when you have it shoved in your face all day to resist eating it. Therefore, I'm hoping for Easter I can make some diabetes friendly food so that she has better options and doesn't feel forced to eat junk. I looked up quite a few ideas for dinner, but for dessert, I am clueless. I read about stevia being a good substitute, followed by a different article that said it was really bad. So...... Is stevia ok for people with diabetes, or should I steer clear of it and not do dessert or do something else? Thanks in advance!

Replies

  • malibu927
    malibu927 Posts: 17,568 Member
    When we’re baking things for my dad (diabetic for over 20 years) we make his things with Splenda. He’s had no issues.
  • marshageroli
    marshageroli Posts: 41 Member
    malibu927 wrote: »
    When we’re baking things for my dad (diabetic for over 20 years) we make his things with Splenda. He’s had no issues.

    Do you make normal desserts, just sub the sugar?
  • rjan91
    rjan91 Posts: 193 Member
    Erythritol or Swerve is another good choice.
  • klenz525
    klenz525 Posts: 39 Member
    Stevia or erythritol are good choices. You may also want to look for a recipe that uses almond flour or coconut flour, since wheat flour is not a good option for diabetics.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    You may want to consider limiting flour too. Refined grains raise blood glucose quite a bit in many diabetics.

    My favourite diabetes friendly dessert is crustless cheesecake with stevia. I usually make a chocolate vanilla swirl. Top it with whipped cream with a bit of vanilla. Yum. Almost no carbs.
  • pebble4321
    pebble4321 Posts: 1,132 Member
    Do you know if she likes/eats those sweeteners?
    While I think your heart is in the right place, deserts with sweeteners aren’t a straight swap - some people get digestive issues from erythritol for example. Personally I find the taste of most sweeteners unpleasant, and would be annoyed if I felt pressured to eat something I didn’t like because someone made it for me specially.
    I guess what I’m saying is that you need to know she likes this stuff otherwise it’s not doing her a favour.
  • concordancia
    concordancia Posts: 5,320 Member
    Diabetic control is often about portion control as much as anything else. Consider making a normal dessert in individually size packaging, ie use mini cupcake tins or small ramekins.
  • marshageroli
    marshageroli Posts: 41 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    You may want to consider limiting flour too. Refined grains raise blood glucose quite a bit in many diabetics.

    My favourite diabetes friendly dessert is crustless cheesecake with stevia. I usually make a chocolate vanilla swirl. Top it with whipped cream with a bit of vanilla. Yum. Almost no carbs.

    That sounds great! Do you have a recipe I could borrow?
  • marshageroli
    marshageroli Posts: 41 Member
    pebble4321 wrote: »
    Do you know if she likes/eats those sweeteners?
    While I think your heart is in the right place, deserts with sweeteners aren’t a straight swap - some people get digestive issues from erythritol for example. Personally I find the taste of most sweeteners unpleasant, and would be annoyed if I felt pressured to eat something I didn’t like because someone made it for me specially.
    I guess what I’m saying is that you need to know she likes this stuff otherwise it’s not doing her a favour.

    I don't, and I'm glad you said something. I would have never thought to ask. Maybe I'll ask her first before I do anything. I would hate to make her feel forced to eat something she doesn't like.
  • marshageroli
    marshageroli Posts: 41 Member
    Diabetic control is often about portion control as much as anything else. Consider making a normal dessert in individually size packaging, ie use mini cupcake tins or small ramekins.

    What a great idea! Thank you!
  • jgnatca
    jgnatca Posts: 14,465 Member
    I like a baked apple filled with walnuts and cinnamon. You may use the Splenda brown sugar or just skip it.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,020 Member
    nvmomketo wrote: »
    You may want to consider limiting flour too. Refined grains raise blood glucose quite a bit in many diabetics.

    My favourite diabetes friendly dessert is crustless cheesecake with stevia. I usually make a chocolate vanilla swirl. Top it with whipped cream with a bit of vanilla. Yum. Almost no carbs.

    That sounds great! Do you have a recipe I could borrow?

    I tend to alter recipes as I bake... This should work...

    Swirled crustless cheesecake

    3 - 8oz cream cheese
    3/4 c swerve (or 1tsp stevia)
    1 tsp vanilla
    6 eggs

    For chocolate swirl:
    1/4 c cocoa
    ~4squares baking chocolate melted ( dark or some unsweetened)
    May need another egg

    Or for pumpkin swirl:
    1 c pumpkin purée
    1tbs cinnamon
    1/2 tsp nutmeg
    1/4 tsp cloves

    Remove 1 cup batter. Add swirled mixture. Pour in springform pan or 8x8 pan greased and/ or lined with parchment. Add plain batter and swirl with knife.

    Bake at 350 or reduced down to 325F for about 55 minutes. Refrigerate for about 3-4 hours.

    You can add a butter, coconut, cocoa crust but it isn't needed. I usually serve it as a square with whipped cream.