Doing Both Hiit and weights?

Ok so I search the web for answers and the info is so conflicting so perhaps writing out my particular case here could help me.

So I have recently gotten back into the gym. I'm a young girl, and don't have weight to lose as such but I do want to lose some overall fat. I know HIIT on a spinning bike would be good. However I know just how good weights are for fat loss in the long term. That said, what I'm beginning with is just dumbbells about 8kg each, and a beginner weight barbell.
What I'm trying to say is that my muscle growth isn't going to be major.

My question is can I continue to do these weighted workouts mainly for lower body 3 times a week and then HIIT on the remaining days that aren't rest days? And because the weights aren't that demanding yet, could I do my workout and then do HIIT as a burn out?

Also what would this look like calorie wise? If I'm creating a deficit through the Hiit, should my food intake stay the same so I don't end up having too few calories for the weights?

And is a 60% C, 25% P , 15% F a good split to see results?

Pls help a gal out :)
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Replies

  • mom23mangos
    mom23mangos Posts: 3,072 Member
    If you are doing true HIIT on a spin bike, then honestly you might not even need anything for your lower body. Maybe your glutes. You could do HIIT spinning offset with upper body weight training.
  • AnvilHead
    AnvilHead Posts: 18,360 Member
    The main issue with HIIT (if it's truly HIIT) is that it imposes stress/demands upon the central nervous system similar to strength training. If your weight workouts are high intensity (and I'm not going to judge whether yours are or not just based upon the information you gave in the OP), doing a lot of HIIT has the potential to create recovery issues. Recovery is a vital part of progress.

    As far as setting up your calories and macros, there's an excellent thread about it here which explains it very well: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/819055/setting-your-calorie-and-macro-targets/p1

    And a very good video explaining whether or not you should eat back your exercise calories, and why: http://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10503681/exercise-calories-do-i-eat-these-a-video-explanation/p1
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,738 Member
    edited April 2018
    "I know HIIT on a spinning bike would be good."
    Not necessarily! It's not good for everyone and it's not good for everyone's goals and it's certainly not good in excessive amounts.
    Would be really helpful if you expanded on what you are aiming to get out of it and describe what exactly you are doing on the bike (in terms of duration, intervals, effort levels).

    "And because the weights aren't that demanding yet, could I do my workout and then do HIIT as a burn out?"

    As you are just starting out although your weights are currently low as a beginner that doesn't mean your muscles won't need recovery time to adapt to the new stress.
    What are you trying to achieve through "burn out"? Why do you think it's a good thing?

    "Also what would this look like calorie wise?"
    By the sound of your goals - whatever is your maintenance level of calories. If you do actually want to lose weight then go for a small deficit.

    "If I'm creating a deficit through the Hiit"
    Real HIIT is a small calorie burner due to the short duration and the balance of short burst and longer recovery (that's why it's important to know what you are actually doing).
    If you want to maintain your weight your maintenance calories do need to take all your exercise into account.

    "And is a 60% C, 25% P , 15% F a good split to see results?"
    Does it allow you to hit suitable amount of protein and fat? Does it help or hinder your adherence by allowing you to eat in a style that suits you?

    I'm a fairly serious cyclist but HIIT would be totally inappropriate for me more than once in a blue moon. Because cycling is a priority to me I accept the compromises it makes on my weight training. I'm not seeing that same priority for you so wondering why you would compromise both your next day lifting and previous day's training recovery by doing HIIT.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    You can turn anything into HIIT with an interval timer even weight lifting. I'm guessing since you want to lose fat without losing weight, means you want abs and muscle definition. Weight lifting is the way go, IMO. Nothing against HIIT and other cardio, they are good for overall weight loss, stamina, heart health and athleticism, which are all important.

    NO, you can't.

    HIIT is a very specific protocol for very specific goals
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    um nope. intervals are just that

    Intervals are intervals.

    HIIT is HIIT.

    They're different things.
  • mutantspicy
    mutantspicy Posts: 624 Member
    yeah OK!
  • mom23mangos
    mom23mangos Posts: 3,072 Member
    um nope. intervals are just that

    Most people cannot achieve true HIIT outside of a laboratory where their oxygen/heart levels can be monitored.

    Plain old fashioned Interval training (nowadays often confused with HIIT), can be done with anything as you stated.
  • erickirb
    erickirb Posts: 12,277 Member
    OP, I will point out that 15% fat intake is very very low. it is usually suggested that minimum fat intake be 0.35 grams per lb of body weight, assuming a healthy weight. This is a minimum amount ideal may be more like 0.45. having said that, that will usually make up 20-35% of one's diet, with 15% I would assume you are not getting enough. Protein and fat are both essential macros, carbs are not. Unless you have a reason to have low fat, I suggest changing carbs to 50% and fat to 25%
  • ijsantos2005
    ijsantos2005 Posts: 306 Member
    edited April 2018
    How high does the intensity need to be to be considered high intensity?
    70%/80%/90%/MAX?
  • sijomial
    sijomial Posts: 19,738 Member
    um nope. intervals are just that

    Yes HIIT is a form of interval training but not all interval training is, or can be, HIIT and it becomes impossible to offer appropriate advice if you call something by the wrong name.
    It's a bit like wearing a heavy wrist watch while walking and calling it strength training.... :)

    The physiological response, recovery and fatigue issues from true HIIT are different to doing a fast paced weights circuit or doing aerobic intervals.

    Even if it's really hard cardio interval training like the 10 minute intervals I sometimes do for over an hour or more that still isn't HIIT.

  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    How high does the intensity need to be to be considered high intensity?
    70%/80%/90%/MAX?

    95-98% of max.

    The next challenge is how you identify your max, and your lactate threshold.
  • mutantspicy
    mutantspicy Posts: 624 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    um nope. intervals are just that

    Yes HIIT is a form of interval training but not all interval training is, or can be, HIIT and it becomes impossible to offer appropriate advice if you call something by the wrong name.
    It's a bit like wearing a heavy wrist watch while walking and calling it strength training.... :)

    The physiological response, recovery and fatigue issues from true HIIT are different to doing a fast paced weights circuit or doing aerobic intervals.

    Even if it's really hard cardio interval training like the 10 minute intervals I sometimes do for over an hour or more that still isn't HIIT.

    Well fair enough. But I don't think the OP is looking for a bunch of pedantic internet experts who think you need an Olympic grade science lab to call it HIIT. Which isn't happening in a spin class anyway. She is asking whether or not its OK to do High Intensity Cardio and Weights on the same day or back to back. The answer is probably not. You need recovery for both workouts and so probably need to do them on separate days.
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,736 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    um nope. intervals are just that

    Yes HIIT is a form of interval training but not all interval training is, or can be, HIIT and it becomes impossible to offer appropriate advice if you call something by the wrong name.
    It's a bit like wearing a heavy wrist watch while walking and calling it strength training.... :)

    The physiological response, recovery and fatigue issues from true HIIT are different to doing a fast paced weights circuit or doing aerobic intervals.

    Even if it's really hard cardio interval training like the 10 minute intervals I sometimes do for over an hour or more that still isn't HIIT.

    Well fair enough. But I don't think the OP is looking for a bunch of pedantic internet experts who think you need an Olympic grade science lab to call it HIIT. Which isn't happening in a spin class anyway. She is asking whether or not its OK to do High Intensity Cardio and Weights on the same day or back to back. The answer is probably not. You need recovery for both workouts and so probably need to do them on separate days.

    Fair enough.

    But you can do HIIT in spin class. You can’t do HIIT in the weight room.
  • spdaphne
    spdaphne Posts: 262 Member
    I actually was just reassessing my goals with my trainer. I told her I like the size I am right now about a size 10 us) but want to lose more fat and build muscle. She's changing my workout program to lifting heavier weights and doing less reps. Before I was lifting moderately with 3 sets and I've built muscle which I'm happy about. I'll still do cardio here and there, but seems to be in line with what's being said here.
  • mutantspicy
    mutantspicy Posts: 624 Member
    spdaphne wrote: »
    I actually was just reassessing my goals with my trainer. I told her I like the size I am right now about a size 10 us) but want to lose more fat and build muscle. She's changing my workout program to lifting heavier weights and doing less reps. Before I was lifting moderately with 3 sets and I've built muscle which I'm happy about. I'll still do cardio here and there, but seems to be in line with what's being said here.

    You don't necessarily have to do it one way or the other. You can do progressive sets also, which combine low rep high weight, and low weight high rep and middle range. But yeah higher weights equals higher intensity more gain, higher heart rate, etc. Its good to fluctuate, to work on endurance, maybe do slower pace with light weight.
    Like you can do 15 reps, 10 reps, 6 reps, with a drop down burnout. for example