Most calories burned in 24 hours?

13

Replies

  • jlklem
    jlklem Posts: 259 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    My longest ride to date was a metric century...around 2,200 calories give or take (reasonable estimate from my Garmin bike computer). I typically don't do more than 1/2s and I'm having to back down from that for the time being unfortunately.

    You rode 124 miles. How long did it take? Easy riding is 300-400 per hour
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,993 Member
    edited May 2018
    jlklem wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    My longest ride to date was a metric century...around 2,200 calories give or take (reasonable estimate from my Garmin bike computer). I typically don't do more than 1/2s and I'm having to back down from that for the time being unfortunately.

    You rode 124 miles. How long did it take? Easy riding is 300-400 per hour

    I road 62 miles. Per 5+ years of data, I burn more than 300-400 calories in an hour of cycling. My own data indicates that it's more like 500 - 600 unless I'm going at a very slow pace and a very flat route. I also typically weigh 180-190 Lbs depending on the time of year.

    I don't recall how long it took, but it was the Enchanted Circle which is a mountain course with plenty of hill climbing. The beginning of the course is a decent...the rest of the ride is mostly climbing or flats.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,813 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jlklem wrote: »
    I think it is a great way for people to share what we are capable of as humans. It’s amazing what we can do.

    Furthermore. Most things we do in life are irrelevant to most people, but there is beauty to be able to connect and share them. That is why there is a forum in MFD.

    But as an competitive athlete it is total relevant....every freaking calorie.

    John

    True. And related to the relevance of calorie burns: I try to consume back roughly 1/2 of the calories, electrolytes, etc that I"m burning each hour that I"m on the bike, so it would be typical for me to consume roughly 250-300 cal/hr. Most, but not all of it, is in liquid form.

    Curious if others here follow a specific fueling formula during cycling, running or similar events.
    @Djproulx
    Rides up to 2hrs - just water.
    2 - 4hrs - sports drink, carby snacks but fairly casual.

    I only fuel in a structured way for rides of over 70/80 miles (intensity is a factor as well as distance).

    For big events such as Centuries where I'm trying for a good time I try to fuel maximally but you can't digest as much as you burn anyway when you are exercising hard so that maximum is what you can digest.
    60g of glucose an hour (240cals) is sometimes given as the maximum but if you add fructose you can hit 90g an hour total (different receptors / digestive pathways) so you can in theory hit 360cals/hour.

    Event routine would be making sure I've eaten plenty of carbs in the few days before, on the day a big bowl of cereal with a scoop of protein powder for breakfast.
    Once I'm moving I get most of my fuel in my drink but also eat a snack (malt loaf or cereal bar) every hour. I get a bit nauseous if I just fuel from liquids and warm sugary drinks for hours on end are pretty revolting.

    I'm riding long at the weekend and part of my preparation this week is coming off caffeine so that on the day I can use a bit of a caffeine hit for big hills or when fatigued and supplementing with beetroot juice (for the nitrates).

    @sijomial - My fueling plans are very similar to what you describe, including race week eating. During exercise, I do nothing special (beyond water) for up to 2 hrs on the bike, or up to roughly 90 minutes on run. My coach has been prescriptive about nutrition/hydration for longer events, and I supplement my liquid fuel (EFS) with foods like waffles, shot blocks, etc, to keep any nausea in check. I'm a caffeine junkie, but wondering if I could cut back/quit during race weeks to take advantage of the caffeine boost on race day. Will have to think about that.
  • ashleyrebekah392
    ashleyrebekah392 Posts: 50 Member
    Around 3,500. Went agate rock hunting which involves a lot of hiking and carrying a backpack full of rocks for hours and hours. My husband and I went for 9 hrs one day. Thought I was gonna die. Lol
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,813 Member
    jlklem wrote: »
    When training for my Ironman...it was max 250-300 on the bike as that is all you body can process. I find this to be very true. Running it was even less. 100 per hour as so much blood is needed to run that the stomach barely can digest. This is based on my coach and coaching others plus a lot of personal experience.

    But all this depends on intensity and duration. My Ironman bike was 160 watts so my stomach was find on 300 per hour. I did a 5:50 bike. But as the day progressed 160 becomes harder on the body and 300 would become to much.

    Last year I rode my bike for 20 continuous hours...at some point I could barely eat.

    My 2 cents.

    John

    I'm taking in roughly those calorie volumes on both the bike and run and it has seemed to work fairly well for me so far. I'm venturing into new territory by doing a full IM this summer, so I'll have to rely on my coach's suggestions for fueling strategies beyond the first 6 hours.

    BTW: My butt got sore just reading your note about 20 continuous hours on the bike. ;)
  • jlklem
    jlklem Posts: 259 Member
    edited May 2018
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jlklem wrote: »
    When training for my Ironman...it was max 250-300 on the bike as that is all you body can process. I find this to be very true. Running it was even less. 100 per hour as so much blood is needed to run that the stomach barely can digest. This is based on my coach and coaching others plus a lot of personal experience.

    But all this depends on intensity and duration. My Ironman bike was 160 watts so my stomach was find on 300 per hour. I did a 5:50 bike. But as the day progressed 160 becomes harder on the body and 300 would become to much.

    Last year I rode my bike for 20 continuous hours...at some point I could barely eat.

    My 2 cents.

    John

    I'm taking in roughly those calorie volumes on both the bike and run and it has seemed to work fairly well for me so far. I'm venturing into new territory by doing a full IM this summer, so I'll have to rely on my coach's suggestions for fueling strategies beyond the first 6 hours.

    BTW: My butt got sore just reading your note about 20 continuous hours on the bike. ;)

    I am doing a 24 hour challenge again this year. Last year they pulled us off the course due to weather, that is why only 20 hours. If I remember correctly it was a 11000 calories ride...NET was still 5K. I simple can not eat and digest that much food. Ate well all week!
  • Wen2Run
    Wen2Run Posts: 62 Member
    Biggest burn for me was about 6500 and 7000 calories, that was a 72 mile ultramarathon.
  • oilphins
    oilphins Posts: 240 Member
    edited May 2018
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.
  • LivingtheLeanDream
    LivingtheLeanDream Posts: 13,345 Member
    When I wore a fitbit I once did a 40k step challenge, at 5ft 2 I burned around 1400 calories above my NEAT that day... (it took me approx 5 hours running/walking.. and I wont be repeating that again, its easier to just eat less LOL)
  • tirowow12385
    tirowow12385 Posts: 699 Member
    April 12, 2018, 1800 calories, I ran at dawn and at dusk and did alot of walking as well and logged over 15 miles and 30,000 steps.
  • Machka9
    Machka9 Posts: 21,223 Member
    Given that I've done several cycling events which have been 24 hours or longer ...
    And given that I use the calculation of 100 calories for every 5 km cycled ...
    Therefore if I cycle 400 km in 24 hours ...

    That's what ... 8000 calories?
  • sarahthes
    sarahthes Posts: 3,397 Member
    Fitbit claims I burned 4392 calories on April 7 - the day I ran my first (and only to date) half marathon.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,813 Member
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.

    This again?

    *sigh*

    The point of the thread isn't about weight loss/gain/management, so calorie balance (in the context of body weight) isn't relevant here.

    Some of us have fitness goals beyond/out side of weight management, and in that context it can be interesting to talk about bigger calorie burns, fueling, recovery, etc.

    I get the need to trumpet calorie balance for weight loss from the MFP rooftops... but every once in a while, that's not what it's about. This is one of those times.


    As @jjpptt2 notes, your bolded comments suggest that its about "sticking to your regular calorie intake and burning what you're supposed to and you won't gain any weight back." That premise is not the point of this discussion.

    What is remarkable to me is the ability of people to participate in these extremely challenging endurance events that test our limits. One way that we can understand the scope of that challenge is by understanding the significant calorie expenditures that occur when someone presses on for hours on end in pursuit of a goal.

    Another facet of this discussion that some find interesting, is that the extremely high calorie burns require participants to practice proper fueling and hydration in order to support the body during such long events. So the calorie burn and fuel consumption equation is a matter of necessity for maintaining performance over a long duration. You'll notice that nowhere in the discussion did posters describe any impact of these events on their weight management plans, because that's not the point.
  • oilphins
    oilphins Posts: 240 Member
    edited May 2018
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.

    This again?

    *sigh*

    The point of the thread isn't about weight loss/gain/management, so calorie balance (in the context of body weight) isn't relevant here.

    Some of us have fitness goals beyond/out side of weight management, and in that context it can be interesting to talk about bigger calorie burns, fueling, recovery, etc.

    I get the need to trumpet calorie balance for weight loss from the MFP rooftops... but every once in a while, that's not what it's about. This is one of those times.


    As @jjpptt2 notes, your bolded comments suggest that its about "sticking to your regular calorie intake and burning what you're supposed to and you won't gain any weight back." That premise is not the point of this discussion.

    What is remarkable to me is the ability of people to participate in these extremely challenging endurance events that test our limits. One way that we can understand the scope of that challenge is by understanding the significant calorie expenditures that occur when someone presses on for hours on end in pursuit of a goal.

    Another facet of this discussion that some find interesting, is that the extremely high calorie burns require participants to practice proper fueling and hydration in order to support the body during such long events. So the calorie burn and fuel consumption equation is a matter of necessity for maintaining performance over a long duration. You'll notice that nowhere in the discussion did posters describe any impact of these events on their weight management plans, because that's not the point.

    I absolutely agree with you, this is the point I tried to get across about burning that many calories unless you have something planned ahead like a marathon or some sort of organized bike tour but not everyday. There has to be a limit to what a realistic goal is, to how many calories you can handle by not overdoing it to give yourself a heart attack or pass out from exhaustion. Know your limits and don't overdo it to where you can't handle what you can't realistically achieve. Ultra marathons, Triathlons, and full marathons are an absolute goal but not something I would attempt 3-4 days a week. I still don't understand why anyone would attempt this on a regular basis, but to each his own I guess. Although he didn't really specify how often he does this.
  • jlklem
    jlklem Posts: 259 Member
    First I meant 24 hours. I know a ton of people who have raced, trained, and/or exercised 20 plus.

    Why does everything need to be weight loss centric...this is the fitness and exercise category. I guess people on forums feel the need to teach or correct or judge...I suppose it’s in us all sometimes.

    Here is my best: https://www.strava.com/activities/1043275403

    We got rained out and they pulled us off the course for 4 hours, going back in a month to get all 24...and 400.

    So 12,000 in one day. Not bad for a 48 year old.

    John
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,831 Member
    edited May 2018
    jlklem wrote: »
    Rode 115 miles today...burned 4375 total calories. Measured with a calibrated power meter, so pretty close to accurate. Two rides 100.5 at 210 watts and then and easy 15 (108 watts) with the wife this evening. 5:40 total time.

    Not my best day ever but pretty good.

    More people should bike. But that’s a different thread...

    John

    And remember, those watts is only the energy to move the bike forward - you still burned BMR level calories during that time, plus energy expended from back and arm and chest muscles supporting you.

    So likely almost 500 more for BMR, plus other body engagement not related to power to pedals.

    Approaching 5K also, group 80 mile ride I turned into personal 100, and the 20 done fast to get back with groups for a faster peleton.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,620 Member
    oilphins wrote: »
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.

    This again?

    *sigh*

    The point of the thread isn't about weight loss/gain/management, so calorie balance (in the context of body weight) isn't relevant here.

    Some of us have fitness goals beyond/out side of weight management, and in that context it can be interesting to talk about bigger calorie burns, fueling, recovery, etc.

    I get the need to trumpet calorie balance for weight loss from the MFP rooftops... but every once in a while, that's not what it's about. This is one of those times.


    As @jjpptt2 notes, your bolded comments suggest that its about "sticking to your regular calorie intake and burning what you're supposed to and you won't gain any weight back." That premise is not the point of this discussion.

    What is remarkable to me is the ability of people to participate in these extremely challenging endurance events that test our limits. One way that we can understand the scope of that challenge is by understanding the significant calorie expenditures that occur when someone presses on for hours on end in pursuit of a goal.

    Another facet of this discussion that some find interesting, is that the extremely high calorie burns require participants to practice proper fueling and hydration in order to support the body during such long events. So the calorie burn and fuel consumption equation is a matter of necessity for maintaining performance over a long duration. You'll notice that nowhere in the discussion did posters describe any impact of these events on their weight management plans, because that's not the point.

    I absolutely agree with you, this is the point I tried to get across about burning that many calories unless you have something planned ahead like a marathon or some sort of organized bike tour but not everyday. There has to be a limit to what a realistic goal is, to how many calories you can handle by not overdoing it to give yourself a heart attack or pass out from exhaustion. Know your limits and don't overdo it to where you can't handle what you can't realistically achieve. I still don't understand why anyone would attempt this on a daily basis, but to each his own I guess.

    Did anyone say they were doing it every day? Heck, did anyone even say they were going out to do something for the sheer goal of seeing how many calories they can burn? I didn't see anyone say that.

    Big calorie burns are the by product of some bigger goal/activity/event. Not the other way around. You're arguing a point that no one is making.
  • oilphins
    oilphins Posts: 240 Member
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.

    This again?

    *sigh*

    The point of the thread isn't about weight loss/gain/management, so calorie balance (in the context of body weight) isn't relevant here.

    Some of us have fitness goals beyond/out side of weight management, and in that context it can be interesting to talk about bigger calorie burns, fueling, recovery, etc.

    I get the need to trumpet calorie balance for weight loss from the MFP rooftops... but every once in a while, that's not what it's about. This is one of those times.


    As @jjpptt2 notes, your bolded comments suggest that its about "sticking to your regular calorie intake and burning what you're supposed to and you won't gain any weight back." That premise is not the point of this discussion.

    What is remarkable to me is the ability of people to participate in these extremely challenging endurance events that test our limits. One way that we can understand the scope of that challenge is by understanding the significant calorie expenditures that occur when someone presses on for hours on end in pursuit of a goal.

    Another facet of this discussion that some find interesting, is that the extremely high calorie burns require participants to practice proper fueling and hydration in order to support the body during such long events. So the calorie burn and fuel consumption equation is a matter of necessity for maintaining performance over a long duration. You'll notice that nowhere in the discussion did posters describe any impact of these events on their weight management plans, because that's not the point.

    I absolutely agree with you, this is the point I tried to get across about burning that many calories unless you have something planned ahead like a marathon or some sort of organized bike tour but not everyday. There has to be a limit to what a realistic goal is, to how many calories you can handle by not overdoing it to give yourself a heart attack or pass out from exhaustion. Know your limits and don't overdo it to where you can't handle what you can't realistically achieve. I still don't understand why anyone would attempt this on a daily basis, but to each his own I guess.

    Did anyone say they were doing it every day? Heck, did anyone even say they were going out to do something for the sheer goal of seeing how many calories they can burn? I didn't see anyone say that.

    Big calorie burns are the by product of some bigger goal/activity/event. Not the other way around. You're arguing a point that no one is making.

    Yes you are right as I edited my last post, he didn't say how often he does this. I'm assuming it's not everyday as that would take a toll on the body. My apologies.
  • collectingblues
    collectingblues Posts: 2,540 Member
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    Djproulx wrote: »
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    oilphins wrote: »
    pondee629 wrote: »
    "Most calories burned in 24 hours?" is an irrelevant number. Calorie deficit is what counts, and it should be modest yet consistent.

    Totally agree with you, if you have a triathlon, marathon, bike tour, or whatever scheduled, then that's awesome to burn those extra calories, but not sure of the relevance for trying to burn a record amount of calories. I'm not going to try to burn 4-5000 calories a day unless there's a reason. As long as you stick to your regular calorie intake and burn what you're suppose to, you won't gain any weight back. And yes also, it's not really 24 hours as you sleep for 7-8 hours. I think he meant in a day. I love bike riding as well but I'd rather run a half marathon to burn 1500 extra calories than ride a bike. Much more challenging in my opinion. I've done the annual Rona M.S bike tours here in my city where we bike 96 km on a Saturday to our destination and then Sunday back home another 96k and I don't find biking as challenging as running. Just my opinion as I've done both. I'm an avid runner that runs 5-6 days a week and I prefer running. Bikers don't get upset at me as this is only MY opinion. I'm sure going uphill and super long bike rides are challenging but try running a full marathon and tell me which is harder. Avid runners back me up on this (lol). Keep up your riding and if this isn't your best day, I'd like to see what your best day is. I'd like to know what you eat those days. Lots and lots of carbs more than likely.

    This again?

    *sigh*

    The point of the thread isn't about weight loss/gain/management, so calorie balance (in the context of body weight) isn't relevant here.

    Some of us have fitness goals beyond/out side of weight management, and in that context it can be interesting to talk about bigger calorie burns, fueling, recovery, etc.

    I get the need to trumpet calorie balance for weight loss from the MFP rooftops... but every once in a while, that's not what it's about. This is one of those times.


    As @jjpptt2 notes, your bolded comments suggest that its about "sticking to your regular calorie intake and burning what you're supposed to and you won't gain any weight back." That premise is not the point of this discussion.

    What is remarkable to me is the ability of people to participate in these extremely challenging endurance events that test our limits. One way that we can understand the scope of that challenge is by understanding the significant calorie expenditures that occur when someone presses on for hours on end in pursuit of a goal.

    Another facet of this discussion that some find interesting, is that the extremely high calorie burns require participants to practice proper fueling and hydration in order to support the body during such long events. So the calorie burn and fuel consumption equation is a matter of necessity for maintaining performance over a long duration. You'll notice that nowhere in the discussion did posters describe any impact of these events on their weight management plans, because that's not the point.

    I absolutely agree with you, this is the point I tried to get across about burning that many calories unless you have something planned ahead like a marathon or some sort of organized bike tour but not everyday. There has to be a limit to what a realistic goal is, to how many calories you can handle by not overdoing it to give yourself a heart attack or pass out from exhaustion. Know your limits and don't overdo it to where you can't handle what you can't realistically achieve. I still don't understand why anyone would attempt this on a daily basis, but to each his own I guess.

    Did anyone say they were doing it every day? Heck, did anyone even say they were going out to do something for the sheer goal of seeing how many calories they can burn? I didn't see anyone say that.

    Big calorie burns are the by product of some bigger goal/activity/event. Not the other way around. You're arguing a point that no one is making.

    Exactly. No one has claimed they do this every day. While I'm sure there are people out there who would feel the need to run a marathon or bike a century daily, no one in this forum has claimed that.