Compound Exercises

butterfli7o
butterfli7o Posts: 1,319 Member
I'm trying to compose a good routine. Besides squats, overhead presses and deadlifts are there any other good compound exercises I should incorporate? I don't want to be working out for an hour and a half every night, so I'm trying to make the most of the time I have. :smile:

Replies

  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,442 Member
    Stronglifts 5X5! Squats, OHP, bench, deads and rows. Quick, easy and makes good progress. There's a free app you can download to keep track.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 41,876 Member
    Cleans and/or barbell rows. You might want to throw in some pullups as well.

    You could also just do Starting Strength.
  • sgt1372
    sgt1372 Posts: 3,977 Member
    edited June 2018
    The basic 4 are all you need: DL, SQT, BP & OHP. They form the core of both Starting Strength and Stronglifts.

    You can get a full body workout and achieve noticeably strength gains just doing these. Depending on your goals, other lifts can be helpful but are not essential.

    All I do other than the basic 4 are rows, pullups pushups and dips. That's enough for me.
  • steveko89
    steveko89 Posts: 2,215 Member
    For the vast majority of people, following an established routine is going to be superior than trying to make your own. At the very least, start with a published routine as a template and modify as needed for equipment availability, and skill level.

    Stronglifts 5x5 was already mentioned. It's a longstanding routine designed with built-in progression centered on compound lifts.
  • jessef593
    jessef593 Posts: 2,272 Member
    I vote a 5x5 and following a real program. If you are unsure as to what constitutes as a compound lift than you for sure do not have enough knowledge or experience to compose an effective program. It is not me being mean. Just speaking plainly and because I want people to achieve progress.
  • Davidsdottir
    Davidsdottir Posts: 1,285 Member
    edited June 2018
    jessef593 wrote: »
    I vote a 5x5 and following a real program. If you are unsure as to what constitutes as a compound lift than you for sure do not have enough knowledge or experience to compose an effective program. It is not me being mean. Just speaking plainly and because I want people to achieve progress.

    Totally agree with Jesse. If you don't know what compounds exist, please use an established program. Many beginner programs won't take you much more than 30 min (which is how long it takes me to get through one of my lifts currently... ugh!)
  • stanmann571
    stanmann571 Posts: 5,728 Member
    I'm trying to compose a good routine. Besides squats, overhead presses and deadlifts are there any other good compound exercises I should incorporate? I don't want to be working out for an hour and a half every night, so I'm trying to make the most of the time I have. :smile:


    Unless you're doing a school project, or have completed a degree program, there's almost zero reason to reinvent the wheel until you understand all the fundamentals of how the car operates. Once you are, sure tweak away, but until then, work from a good solid program and adjust fires as appropriate.

    I know it feels like we're piling on, but really, there's no benefit to not taking the easy way out.
  • jjpptt2
    jjpptt2 Posts: 5,650 Member
    edited June 2018
    There are no must do or must avoid lifts... so which ones you do vs not can be largely personal preference. I would suggest building your routine around 1-2 lower body pushes (back squat, front squat, lunges and all their variations), 1-2 lower body pulls (deadlifts, good mornings, and all their variations), 1-2 upper body pushes (bench, overhead press, dip, etc), 1-2 upper body pulls (rows, pull-ups, etc).

    Support those movements with a couple of accessory movements and you should be pretty well set.

    But picking exercises is fairly easy. Picking weights, sets, reps, frequency, volume, progression. etc is hard. That's why it's usually better to follow an established program.
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you
  • butterfli7o
    butterfli7o Posts: 1,319 Member
    Thank you all. <3
  • jessef593
    jessef593 Posts: 2,272 Member
    jjpptt2 wrote: »
    There are no must do or must avoid lifts... so which ones you do vs not can be largely personal preference. I would suggest building your routine around 1-2 lower body pushes (back squat, front squat, lunges and all their variations), 1-2 lower body pulls (deadlifts, good mornings, and all their variations), 1-2 upper body pushes (bench, overhead press, dip, etc), 1-2 upper body pulls (rows, pull-ups, etc).

    Support those movements with a couple of accessory movements and you should be pretty well set.

    But picking exercises is fairly easy. Picking weights, sets, reps, frequency, volume, progression. etc is hard. That's why it's usually better to follow an established program.
    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10332083/which-lifting-program-is-the-best-for-you

    Wasn't sure where you were going with that but I like the way you ended it. Sure it's easy to pick exercises. But choosing all the variables to make them effective as possible is where knowledge and experience is a must.
  • Chieflrg
    Chieflrg Posts: 9,097 Member
    You can't go wrong wit Starting Strength especially since your pressed for time.