Lumbar Sprain

I sprained my lumbar last September and with PT was able to return to my Pure Barre Classes. I returned to classes with the mindset of not pushing too hard and modifying as needed. Even so more often than not my lumbar hurts the day following a class. I LOVE Pure Barre and it’s the only workout I’ve ever stuck to consistently. I’m pretty sure that as much as I love it, it’s no good for my lumbar. My question is this — what else would some who loves Pure Barre love doing? I need to find something I would be as eager to do without injuring myself. Any suggestions?

Replies

  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    Have you talked to an instructor? Exercise is a recommended treatment for sprains. If you weren't going beyond normal range of motion, the tendons and muscles shouldn't tear.
  • Urbancowbarn
    Urbancowbarn Posts: 97 Member
    I have talked them and they seem as perplexed as I am. My PT said that my abs were dormant and gave me some breathing exercises to wake them up. I’m starting to think they are in a coma and that my back is compensating for their weakness. I’m wondering if Pilates might help.
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited June 2018
    My PT said that my abs were dormant and gave me some breathing exercises to wake them up.
    I'm assuming by PT you mean physical therapist. If so I would either a. ask for some exercises to strengthen your abs and back and/or b. find a new PT.
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.
  • Avidkeo
    Avidkeo Posts: 3,157 Member
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.

    Lumbar sprain is definitely a thing. There are lots of longitudinal muscles that run up and down the spine, both in front and behind that can be sprained if suddenly twisted the wrong way. It's pretty common actually. The number of back problems seen on imaging is very small actually - as in only around 5% of people with back pain who has imaging actually have anything visible. I'm a radiographer so deal with this every day.
  • Urbancowbarn
    Urbancowbarn Posts: 97 Member
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.

    I went to an ortho and they x-rayed it, prescribed physical therapy, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant.
  • CarvedTones
    CarvedTones Posts: 2,340 Member
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.

    Lumbar sprain is definitely a thing. There are lots of longitudinal muscles that run up and down the spine, both in front and behind that can be sprained if suddenly twisted the wrong way. It's pretty common actually. The number of back problems seen on imaging is very small actually - as in only around 5% of people with back pain who has imaging actually have anything visible. I'm a radiographer so deal with this every day.

    I have heard from docs that most people have nothing show up, but I didn't realize most meant about 95%. The spinal specialist who did my shots wanted imaging before making an appointment. Mine shows 2 bad discs, stenosis and evidence of unspecific spondylitis. The spinal guy said there was surgery that he didn't recommend, the shots (but he doesn't recommend them more than a couple of times), prescription pain medicine (not recommended if you can do without) and NSAIDs/ice/heat. The things that have helped the most are exercise, improved posture and becoming tolerant of moderate pain. Yeah, the last one kind of sucks but the choices seem to be that, being a strung out opioid junkie or laying around in bed whining a lot.
  • cfredz
    cfredz Posts: 301 Member
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.

    I went to an ortho and they x-rayed it, prescribed physical therapy, anti-inflammatory, and muscle relaxant.

    I was prescribed the same yesterday, except not a lumbar sprain, they told me im having muscle spasms in my back
    My PT also told me need to work on activating my glutse and hamstrings, and abs, so my back stops overcompensating.
    Got breathing exercises from them to work my abs/hamstrings
    feels better already and its only been 2 days
  • Avidkeo
    Avidkeo Posts: 3,157 Member
    Avidkeo wrote: »
    Out of curiosity, who diagnosed it as a sprained lumbar? I have a lot of lumbar problems (that are clearly visible on an MRI) and seen a few doctors, including spinal specialists, and never heard of a lumbar sprain being diagnosed before. I have had the shots a couple of times, where they go in deep with imaging used to carefully inject cortisone at the sides of the worst joints (I got 4 shots each time, 2 at L3-L4 and 2 at L5-S1) and they help for a few months if the problem is disc related. I would get a second opinion if they didn't use advanced imaging. My pain is largely mitigated by exercise, BTW. I do not know if your problem is disc related; I just encourage you to rule that out if it was not definitively ruled out in the initial diagnosis. Back pain without an obvious underlying cause is so common that they do try to limit advanced diagnostics and sometimes screen out patients they should have looked closer at.

    Lumbar sprain is definitely a thing. There are lots of longitudinal muscles that run up and down the spine, both in front and behind that can be sprained if suddenly twisted the wrong way. It's pretty common actually. The number of back problems seen on imaging is very small actually - as in only around 5% of people with back pain who has imaging actually have anything visible. I'm a radiographer so deal with this every day.

    I have heard from docs that most people have nothing show up, but I didn't realize most meant about 95%. The spinal specialist who did my shots wanted imaging before making an appointment. Mine shows 2 bad discs, stenosis and evidence of unspecific spondylitis. The spinal guy said there was surgery that he didn't recommend, the shots (but he doesn't recommend them more than a couple of times), prescription pain medicine (not recommended if you can do without) and NSAIDs/ice/heat. The things that have helped the most are exercise, improved posture and becoming tolerant of moderate pain. Yeah, the last one kind of sucks but the choices seem to be that, being a strung out opioid junkie or laying around in bed whining a lot.

    Ouch. Yep the bist thing to do for back pain is keep moving. I know this is cliche but I found yoga really helped my lower back pain when it flares up. I have a little bit of degenerative changes so nothing can fix that.
  • madmickie
    madmickie Posts: 221 Member
    You might want to check out some of Lorimer Moseley/ Peter O'Sullivan on youtube - on why we feel pain. Might change how you think about what is going on with your back.
  • steelergirl314
    steelergirl314 Posts: 17 Member
    You may want to consider seeing if there is a Barre Amped studio in your area... It should be VERY similar to your Pure Barre, but Barre Amped focuses on a NEUTRAL spine for 90% of the workout instead of the pelvic tilt promoted in Pure Barre. Also, with my lumbar disc problems, I often have related muscle spasms and dry needling is my HERO - in TN, you can find physical therapy offices that offer dry needling instead of finding an acupuncturist. Good luck!