Is there a right way to jog?

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Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,859 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    jodiaraya wrote: »
    Is there a right way to jog so that my knees don’t get pulled again?
    Thanks!

    One foot in front of the other, then repeat.

    I'd agree that it sounds like you've overdone it.

    Personally I'm not a bit advocate of gait analysis, it has a place but the importance is overblown. Never bothered myself and I've done seven marathons and ultras this season.

    I'd support the above about using C25K though.

    Are you a neutral?

    I supinate, which I think is more rare...I was having major issues running because I had a shoe designed to correct pronation and it was causing extreme supination which was resulting in major posterior tibial tendinitis among other things.

    I overpronate quite significantly. I find far more effect from varying the heel/ toe elevation than anything else. Distance also plays a part. My road shoes have some cushioning, my trail shoes don't. Should probably add that for greater than marathon distance I will have a bit more cushioning, or swap shoes during the event.

    Supination is less common, and tends to show up more as back pain

    Didn't have any back pain...mostly posterior tibial pain, ankle sprains, shin splints, and IT band syndrome. I still get all of the above if I walk a lot while neglecting to wear my custom inserts. I've given up on running altogether which is kind of a bummer because I liked doing 5Ks with my wife.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    jodiaraya wrote: »
    Is there a right way to jog so that my knees don’t get pulled again?
    Thanks!

    One foot in front of the other, then repeat.

    I'd agree that it sounds like you've overdone it.

    Personally I'm not a bit advocate of gait analysis, it has a place but the importance is overblown. Never bothered myself and I've done seven marathons and ultras this season.

    I'd support the above about using C25K though.

    Are you a neutral?

    I supinate, which I think is more rare...I was having major issues running because I had a shoe designed to correct pronation and it was causing extreme supination which was resulting in major posterior tibial tendinitis among other things.

    I overpronate quite significantly. I find far more effect from varying the heel/ toe elevation than anything else. Distance also plays a part. My road shoes have some cushioning, my trail shoes don't. Should probably add that for greater than marathon distance I will have a bit more cushioning, or swap shoes during the event.

    Supination is less common, and tends to show up more as back pain

    Didn't have any back pain...mostly posterior tibial pain, ankle sprains, shin splints, and IT band syndrome. I still get all of the above if I walk a lot while neglecting to wear my custom inserts. I've given up on running altogether which is kind of a bummer because I liked doing 5Ks with my wife.

    A supinator won't absorb landing impact in the motion of the ankle, so the effect tends to propagate up the body. That's what leads to the increased incidence of back pain. What you're describing is all consistent with the using motion control shoes though. The stresses on the lower leg from fighting against the natural roll would lead to the shin splints, and the ITBS. It places a significant rotational load on the knee.

    I can understand the frustration.
  • oilphins
    oilphins Posts: 240 Member
    edited October 2018
    VioletRojo wrote: »
    Go to a running store and get fitted for shoes. Shoes are the single most important piece of equipment for runners and you need to make sure they are right for your anatomy and the way you run. That said, the right way to run is the way your body naturally moves.

    This is exactly right. I've been an avid runner for 10 years and you need the right shoes. There is no particular way to run, you just move how your body goes. If you try to run a different way then you normally do, you could end up with some type of injury. Just curious, are you a bit overweight? I'm asking because when I first started running I was close to 200 pounds. I'm now at about 175 and the running is much easier being 25 pounds lighter. That could be another reason why you knees hurt. If you're not then just make sure you get a good pair of runners. Good luck to you.
  • _mr_b
    _mr_b Posts: 299 Member
    Your knees hurt because they’re not used to it yet.
    Slow down. In terms of the treadmill and your workouts, rest days are often more important than training days as you need time to recover.
    Now’s not the time for sprints, got to a goal distance and then look at speed work and increasing distance. You need to get the base miles in first.

    Could be worth checking your pronation and getting new shoes, an easy way to check is the print you leave on the floor when you get out of the shower/bath as that’ll tell you if your arches are high/neutral/collapse.

    Good to hear you’re already enjoying it though!
  • 7lenny7
    7lenny7 Posts: 3,397 Member
    Before I started running I was 50 pounds overweight. Rather than start by running, I spent two months just walking. I'd walk or hike fast enough to raise my heart rate and get tired (which wasn't tough to do back then). This was enough to start building up my cardiovascular fitness and toughen up my joints and tendons. At the end of those two months I ran my first 5K. I was SLOW, but other than having to stop for traffic a couple of times, I never had to stop running.

    Don't underestimate the power of walking to start increasing your fitness and get you on the path to running. As many have said, you want to run slow. That was the key thing I learned when I started.

    kudos to you for getting on that treadmill and using it, keep it up!!