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No intimidation "gyms"

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Replies

  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    mortuseon_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    mg07030 wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    While I think the concept itself of "no intimidation" gyms is silly and unnecessarily instills fear of gyms, I have no problem with the existence of 'less hardcore' gyms. Not everybody is (or wants to be) a hardcore powerlifter or bodybuilder, and that's perfectly fine. In terms of general health, any exercise is better than no exercise.

    I do have a problem with the blatant hypocrisy of Planet Fitness' marketing strategy. They label themselves as a "no judgment zone", yet they're highly judgmental of fit people and their commercials stereotype and mock them in various ways. If any other gym chain wanted to project a more 'hardcore' image and made TV commercials stereotyping, mocking and belittling fat people and scrawny non-lifters in a similar way, they'd be crucified for it.

    Well said!

    I kinda had to laugh because I’m pretty sure I go to an “intimidation gym” lol

    I guess as long as people are getting fit and healthy right? 🤷🏼‍♀️

    I belonged to a Gold’s Gym in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s that was the home gym for several bodybuilders, both pro and amateur, men and women, so I guess some people would consider that an “intimidation gym”. Thing is, they were the most chill people in the whole gym - so into their own workouts that they hardly even noticed anything going on around them. They always racked their weights, put away their dumbbells and wiped down the equipment because it’s what they were taught to do, and because the other bodybuilders would call them out if they didn’t. They’d say hi, but never offered unsolicited advice or harassed anybody. The only times I ever saw them do anything like that was when the high school gym bros would get rowdy and start acting stupid - a few quiet words from one of the bodybuilders and the stupidity would cease very quickly.

    I’ve had worse experiences in the “non-intimidation” type gyms - brain dead people hogging stations while they text, take selfies for their instasnapface accounts, or sit there and gossip about their dates. If you’re there to workout, then workout - if you’re there to socialize and impress your social media followers, go do it somewhere where you’re not hindering everybody else from getting their workouts done. That kind of garbage is more likely to happen in those kind of gyms because everybody is afraid to say anything to them because of the “judgment free” thing.

    I’d much rather be in a gym with a bunch of hardcore “lunks” going quietly (or even noisily) and efficiently about their workouts than with a bunch of sheeple randomly stumbling around from station to station, competing for social media ‘likes’ and leaving a trail of their “toys” strewn around the gym behind them.

    Spot on:

    s52q93aghnhh.png

    Heaven forbid you have to ASK to work in during someone's set! And god forbid they use an app to track their training, lest they be judged by Ye Olde School Gym Bros. This is ridiculous. If someone is hogging the squat rack, use your words and ask them politely to move. It's not that hard.

    Believe me, I have no problem asking someone hogging a piece of equipment to move their *kitten*.

    Thing is, God forbid, people should have enough common sense to do it without being asked

    You want people to anticipate your needs in a gym?

    Honestly, the gym I belonged to that was the worst for bros on phones and people hogging squat racks, benches, and power cages was an LA Fitness.

    The best gym I ever belonged to was a gym that was part of our local health complex/wellness center, but it was a small gym (to accommodate the swimming pool) and had a limited number of benches. If you hit it at a crowded time, there was a lot of waiting.

    Planet Fitness was a mix of people, including dudebros who were helpful. It was my first gym because of location and cost. I'm not fond of their marketing, but that's not the only thing that influences my decisions to join gyms.

    No I do not expect people to anticipate my needs in a gym. That's why I have no problem asking to work in.

    It should be common courtesy to not hog space/equipment in a public place. Wouldn't you think someone was s total douche if you were at a crowded airport and someone had their crap on 3 seats in the waiting area and you had to ask them to move some of it so you could sit?

    Yes, but I wouldn't be trying to use those people to prove a point about certain types of airports either.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,672 Member
    Honestly, the gym I belonged to that was the worst for bros on phones and people hogging squat racks, benches, and power cages was an LA Fitness.

    I don't think anyone is claiming PF is worse for that. I thought AnvilHead brought it up in a list of easy rules for people who are new to not annoy others at the gym (or at least be able to feel confident they were in the right).

    People occasionally make it hard to work in at my gym too.
  • Psychgrrl
    Psychgrrl Posts: 3,152 Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    lkpducky wrote: »
    MikePTY wrote: »
    This post made me interested to look up the Planet Fitness gyms in my country, and it turns out the memberships here are $15 a month! :o

    That's one extra cuppa coffee. Maybe they serve coffee as well? :p

    On the first Tuesday of every month, free coffee and bagels...

    They don't really have bagels in my country either.

    I am so sorry for you and your compatriots. :'(

    Hopefully you have some other wonderful national foods to make up for it.

    They do! And there is one bagel place here that does sell a mostly authentic bagel, so I always have there.

    Plus I'll be in New York in less than 2 weeks and I'm going to eat ALL OF THE BAGELS

    From where are you visiting?

    Panama City, Panama. I was born and raised in New York though.

    Happy Homecoming!!! :smiley:
  • Psychgrrl
    Psychgrrl Posts: 3,152 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    mortuseon_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    mg07030 wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    While I think the concept itself of "no intimidation" gyms is silly and unnecessarily instills fear of gyms, I have no problem with the existence of 'less hardcore' gyms. Not everybody is (or wants to be) a hardcore powerlifter or bodybuilder, and that's perfectly fine. In terms of general health, any exercise is better than no exercise.

    I do have a problem with the blatant hypocrisy of Planet Fitness' marketing strategy. They label themselves as a "no judgment zone", yet they're highly judgmental of fit people and their commercials stereotype and mock them in various ways. If any other gym chain wanted to project a more 'hardcore' image and made TV commercials stereotyping, mocking and belittling fat people and scrawny non-lifters in a similar way, they'd be crucified for it.

    Well said!

    I kinda had to laugh because I’m pretty sure I go to an “intimidation gym” lol

    I guess as long as people are getting fit and healthy right? 🤷🏼‍♀️

    I belonged to a Gold’s Gym in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s that was the home gym for several bodybuilders, both pro and amateur, men and women, so I guess some people would consider that an “intimidation gym”. Thing is, they were the most chill people in the whole gym - so into their own workouts that they hardly even noticed anything going on around them. They always racked their weights, put away their dumbbells and wiped down the equipment because it’s what they were taught to do, and because the other bodybuilders would call them out if they didn’t. They’d say hi, but never offered unsolicited advice or harassed anybody. The only times I ever saw them do anything like that was when the high school gym bros would get rowdy and start acting stupid - a few quiet words from one of the bodybuilders and the stupidity would cease very quickly.

    I’ve had worse experiences in the “non-intimidation” type gyms - brain dead people hogging stations while they text, take selfies for their instasnapface accounts, or sit there and gossip about their dates. If you’re there to workout, then workout - if you’re there to socialize and impress your social media followers, go do it somewhere where you’re not hindering everybody else from getting their workouts done. That kind of garbage is more likely to happen in those kind of gyms because everybody is afraid to say anything to them because of the “judgment free” thing.

    I’d much rather be in a gym with a bunch of hardcore “lunks” going quietly (or even noisily) and efficiently about their workouts than with a bunch of sheeple randomly stumbling around from station to station, competing for social media ‘likes’ and leaving a trail of their “toys” strewn around the gym behind them.

    Spot on:

    s52q93aghnhh.png

    Heaven forbid you have to ASK to work in during someone's set! And god forbid they use an app to track their training, lest they be judged by Ye Olde School Gym Bros. This is ridiculous. If someone is hogging the squat rack, use your words and ask them politely to move. It's not that hard.

    Believe me, I have no problem asking someone hogging a piece of equipment to move their *kitten*.

    Thing is, God forbid, people should have enough common sense to do it without being asked

    You want people to anticipate your needs in a gym?

    Honestly, the gym I belonged to that was the worst for bros on phones and people hogging squat racks, benches, and power cages was an LA Fitness.

    The best gym I ever belonged to was a gym that was part of our local health complex/wellness center, but it was a small gym (to accommodate the swimming pool) and had a limited number of benches. If you hit it at a crowded time, there was a lot of waiting.

    Planet Fitness was a mix of people, including dudebros who were helpful. It was my first gym because of location and cost. I'm not fond of their marketing, but that's not the only thing that influences my decisions to join gyms.

    No I do not expect people to anticipate my needs in a gym. That's why I have no problem asking to work in.

    It should be common courtesy to not hog space/equipment in a public place. Wouldn't you think someone was s total douche if you were at a crowded airport and someone had their crap on 3 seats in the waiting area and you had to ask them to move some of it so you could sit?

    I currently work out at the campus rec center. Love it—beautiful facility, cheap, convenient. The only pet peeve I have is the groups of college students (3-4) who workout and talk and keep a station occupied for an hour or more. I noticed this more here than other, public gyms. I just go early on the weekends (or late on Friday/Saturday nights) Most college-aged folk are still sleeping in weekend mornings. :wink:
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,245 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    mortuseon_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    mg07030 wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    While I think the concept itself of "no intimidation" gyms is silly and unnecessarily instills fear of gyms, I have no problem with the existence of 'less hardcore' gyms. Not everybody is (or wants to be) a hardcore powerlifter or bodybuilder, and that's perfectly fine. In terms of general health, any exercise is better than no exercise.

    I do have a problem with the blatant hypocrisy of Planet Fitness' marketing strategy. They label themselves as a "no judgment zone", yet they're highly judgmental of fit people and their commercials stereotype and mock them in various ways. If any other gym chain wanted to project a more 'hardcore' image and made TV commercials stereotyping, mocking and belittling fat people and scrawny non-lifters in a similar way, they'd be crucified for it.

    Well said!

    I kinda had to laugh because I’m pretty sure I go to an “intimidation gym” lol

    I guess as long as people are getting fit and healthy right? 🤷🏼‍♀️

    I belonged to a Gold’s Gym in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s that was the home gym for several bodybuilders, both pro and amateur, men and women, so I guess some people would consider that an “intimidation gym”. Thing is, they were the most chill people in the whole gym - so into their own workouts that they hardly even noticed anything going on around them. They always racked their weights, put away their dumbbells and wiped down the equipment because it’s what they were taught to do, and because the other bodybuilders would call them out if they didn’t. They’d say hi, but never offered unsolicited advice or harassed anybody. The only times I ever saw them do anything like that was when the high school gym bros would get rowdy and start acting stupid - a few quiet words from one of the bodybuilders and the stupidity would cease very quickly.

    I’ve had worse experiences in the “non-intimidation” type gyms - brain dead people hogging stations while they text, take selfies for their instasnapface accounts, or sit there and gossip about their dates. If you’re there to workout, then workout - if you’re there to socialize and impress your social media followers, go do it somewhere where you’re not hindering everybody else from getting their workouts done. That kind of garbage is more likely to happen in those kind of gyms because everybody is afraid to say anything to them because of the “judgment free” thing.

    I’d much rather be in a gym with a bunch of hardcore “lunks” going quietly (or even noisily) and efficiently about their workouts than with a bunch of sheeple randomly stumbling around from station to station, competing for social media ‘likes’ and leaving a trail of their “toys” strewn around the gym behind them.

    Spot on:

    s52q93aghnhh.png

    Heaven forbid you have to ASK to work in during someone's set! And god forbid they use an app to track their training, lest they be judged by Ye Olde School Gym Bros. This is ridiculous. If someone is hogging the squat rack, use your words and ask them politely to move. It's not that hard.

    Seems like this would be harder for a newbie/someone with social anxiety/someone who didn't know people weren't permitted to just hog equipment when not using it. So I vote for it being pretty rude to wait for others to ask to work in.

    I totally agree, although I would say that in most of the gyms I've worked out in over the past 35 to 40 years, the large majority of the time if you stood near a piece of equipment somebody was using, looking like you were waiting, the person using it would notice and either ask if you wanted to work in, or say that they were on their last set.

    Well, on second, thought, I can testify that that was the common reaction in the earlier part of that time period. It's been a lot of years since I was too shy/anxious/whatever to just open my mouth and ask how many more sets they have and if I can work in. But I have occasionally noticed people (including myself) doing that in more recent years for folks who seem to be waiting -- and have occasionally been asked if I wanted to work in when I only happened to be resting, thinking, recording, or drinking in the general vicinity. Because most people don't want to hog the equipment.

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,223 Member
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    mortuseon_ wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    mg07030 wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    While I think the concept itself of "no intimidation" gyms is silly and unnecessarily instills fear of gyms, I have no problem with the existence of 'less hardcore' gyms. Not everybody is (or wants to be) a hardcore powerlifter or bodybuilder, and that's perfectly fine. In terms of general health, any exercise is better than no exercise.

    I do have a problem with the blatant hypocrisy of Planet Fitness' marketing strategy. They label themselves as a "no judgment zone", yet they're highly judgmental of fit people and their commercials stereotype and mock them in various ways. If any other gym chain wanted to project a more 'hardcore' image and made TV commercials stereotyping, mocking and belittling fat people and scrawny non-lifters in a similar way, they'd be crucified for it.

    Well said!

    I kinda had to laugh because I’m pretty sure I go to an “intimidation gym” lol

    I guess as long as people are getting fit and healthy right? 🤷🏼‍♀️

    I belonged to a Gold’s Gym in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s that was the home gym for several bodybuilders, both pro and amateur, men and women, so I guess some people would consider that an “intimidation gym”. Thing is, they were the most chill people in the whole gym - so into their own workouts that they hardly even noticed anything going on around them. They always racked their weights, put away their dumbbells and wiped down the equipment because it’s what they were taught to do, and because the other bodybuilders would call them out if they didn’t. They’d say hi, but never offered unsolicited advice or harassed anybody. The only times I ever saw them do anything like that was when the high school gym bros would get rowdy and start acting stupid - a few quiet words from one of the bodybuilders and the stupidity would cease very quickly.

    I’ve had worse experiences in the “non-intimidation” type gyms - brain dead people hogging stations while they text, take selfies for their instasnapface accounts, or sit there and gossip about their dates. If you’re there to workout, then workout - if you’re there to socialize and impress your social media followers, go do it somewhere where you’re not hindering everybody else from getting their workouts done. That kind of garbage is more likely to happen in those kind of gyms because everybody is afraid to say anything to them because of the “judgment free” thing.

    I’d much rather be in a gym with a bunch of hardcore “lunks” going quietly (or even noisily) and efficiently about their workouts than with a bunch of sheeple randomly stumbling around from station to station, competing for social media ‘likes’ and leaving a trail of their “toys” strewn around the gym behind them.

    Spot on:

    s52q93aghnhh.png

    Heaven forbid you have to ASK to work in during someone's set! And god forbid they use an app to track their training, lest they be judged by Ye Olde School Gym Bros. This is ridiculous. If someone is hogging the squat rack, use your words and ask them politely to move. It's not that hard.

    Believe me, I have no problem asking someone hogging a piece of equipment to move their *kitten*.

    Thing is, God forbid, people should have enough common sense to do it without being asked

    You want people to anticipate your needs in a gym?

    Honestly, the gym I belonged to that was the worst for bros on phones and people hogging squat racks, benches, and power cages was an LA Fitness.

    The best gym I ever belonged to was a gym that was part of our local health complex/wellness center, but it was a small gym (to accommodate the swimming pool) and had a limited number of benches. If you hit it at a crowded time, there was a lot of waiting.

    Planet Fitness was a mix of people, including dudebros who were helpful. It was my first gym because of location and cost. I'm not fond of their marketing, but that's not the only thing that influences my decisions to join gyms.

    Ya, an LA Fitness I belonged to was the worst for people not reracking. My goodness, was it bad. And this was in the AM before work, so the staff hadn't put things away the night before either.
  • Nachise
    Nachise Posts: 395 Member
    99% of the time, I work out at the gym at Walter Reed Military Medical Center. There might be flashier gyms out there. There might be gyms with more/better equipment. However, it suits me because I don't have to deal with the stink of 'roid rats, and people say things like "please" and "thank you". I have a pool, a weight room, an aerobics room, gymnasium, indoor track, and a trainer I see twice a week. I sign in, pick up my towels, and pack my locker before I work out. Most folks re-rack. It's clean.

    When I travel to WV, though, PF is all I have, except for the Y, which is very crowded, and rather unsanitary. There are a couple of "boxes" out there, but that is not my thing, and another fitness center that has really "dated" treadmills and ellipticals, and sketchy small pools. I'll do my aerobic exercise outdoors, then come inside for weights. The one thing I absolutely hate about PF is the smell of that cushioning on the floor.
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    edited November 2018
    Nachise wrote: »
    99% of the time, I work out at the gym at Walter Reed Military Medical Center. There might be flashier gyms out there. There might be gyms with more/better equipment. However, it suits me because I don't have to deal with the stink of 'roid rats, and people say things like "please" and "thank you". I have a pool, a weight room, an aerobics room, gymnasium, indoor track, and a trainer I see twice a week. I sign in, pick up my towels, and pack my locker before I work out. Most folks re-rack. It's clean.

    When I travel to WV, though, PF is all I have, except for the Y, which is very crowded, and rather unsanitary. There are a couple of "boxes" out there, but that is not my thing, and another fitness center that has really "dated" treadmills and ellipticals, and sketchy small pools. I'll do my aerobic exercise outdoors, then come inside for weights. The one thing I absolutely hate about PF is the smell of that cushioning on the floor.

    I was going to use a PF for a day when out of town visiting relatives (not in a high cost city). They wanted $20 for a day pass. I was like, you're kidding, you charge $10 a month (wouldn't let me sign up for a month).

    Skipped lifting that day.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,256 Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Recently found out this is a thing beyond the obvious Planet Fitness.

    I think this is a completely BS thing. I will admit it is a genius business model (Keep membership costs so low people will keep it even if they don't use it, discourage the culture of people who will put wear and tear on your equipment, and could possibly teach newcomers something). I will give credit to the idea from a financial standpoint.

    From a fitness standpoint, it's completely pointless and is the embodiment of our lazy, overly PC, overfed American culture, at least IMO. It would be better for our country as a whole if there was less of this "you're fine the way you are, but if you want to work out you can but whatever is ok" and more of the attitude "you are obese, here is the means and knowledge to fix it - now put in some work."

    That's just my .02. Debate

    Do you think that intimidation is important for habit changing? Nothing wrong with encouraging people to put in some work (that's what all gyms generally are for, regardless of if they're considered "intimidation gyms" or not), but why is intimidation necessary? Don't you think that people are more likely to make changes when they don't feel like they'll be judged for their beginner fitness level? Everyone starts at the beginning, and fear of judgment holds an awful lot of people back from what we know they can accomplish.

    The problem is, you can/will be judged anywhere you go. It's not like Planet Fitness is filled with a different species of human being that has had judgment magically removed from their minds. You'll be judged in the grocery store, the post office, at work, walking down the street, sitting in a restaurant - basically anywhere you go. There are judgmental and non-judgmental people in any gym/workout environment. The only way to avoid it is to either work out at home, or find a gym which has individual, isolated cubicles where you can work out without anybody else seeing you - or that only allows one person in at a time.

    The vast majority of people in any given gym are far less judgmental than the people you're around in your life the remainder of the time. Even the most fit people there started out unfit at some point, and have traversed a long, hard road to get to where they are. They understand what a newbie goes through, because they were there once too. If they notice you to any extent beyond a fleeting glance while they're busy with their own workout, the thought is most likely that they're happy to see you taking that first step and trying to improve yourself. Basically the only way anybody is judged negatively in a gym is if you're doing something stupid and/or purposely drawing attention to yourself. And about 90% of the people in any given gym are just as insecure and worried about judgment as you are.

    Gyms are not places filled with superhuman people. They're the same people you deal with every day as you go about your life.

    I'm on the board of our workplace gym, which is in a government building and is shared by government civilians and armed services personnel stationed here. Earlier this year we had to deal with a lot of serious problems with some of the uniformed men making inappropriate and cruel comments to several of the women in there (particularly to some of the heavier and older ones). We investigated and were horrified to find out that this had been going on for quite some time, but the women being victimized were too embarrassed to complain and just quit.

    The problem was fixed and resolution is a long story, but my point is: the "no intimidation" thing at PF gets perpetually ridiculed and may seem silly and unnecessary to a lot of people, but there is a reason why it was conceived and that a global gym empire was built upon this. Thousands of people are working out at PF who would otherwise not set foot in a conventional gym because of past bad experiences or simply because being a new person at a gym is intimidating, and more people exercising is a good thing

    Sad that people are so misguided to believe this behavior is acceptable. Good that they reacted and hopefully the individuals and behavior was corrected.

    I note a similar behavior in soldiers and police officers - the Hollywood image of acceptable behavior (piggish behavior) and what is actually acceptable (professional behavior). Half of the problem leaders face is retraining the unacceptable. Unfortunately if a leader doesn't get the same behavioral correction an entire department can be lost.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,672 Member
    edited November 2018
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Packerjohn wrote: »
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    Recently found out this is a thing beyond the obvious Planet Fitness.

    I think this is a completely BS thing. I will admit it is a genius business model (Keep membership costs so low people will keep it even if they don't use it, discourage the culture of people who will put wear and tear on your equipment, and could possibly teach newcomers something). I will give credit to the idea from a financial standpoint.

    From a fitness standpoint, it's completely pointless and is the embodiment of our lazy, overly PC, overfed American culture, at least IMO. It would be better for our country as a whole if there was less of this "you're fine the way you are, but if you want to work out you can but whatever is ok" and more of the attitude "you are obese, here is the means and knowledge to fix it - now put in some work."

    That's just my .02. Debate

    Do you think that intimidation is important for habit changing? Nothing wrong with encouraging people to put in some work (that's what all gyms generally are for, regardless of if they're considered "intimidation gyms" or not), but why is intimidation necessary? Don't you think that people are more likely to make changes when they don't feel like they'll be judged for their beginner fitness level? Everyone starts at the beginning, and fear of judgment holds an awful lot of people back from what we know they can accomplish.

    The problem is, you can/will be judged anywhere you go. It's not like Planet Fitness is filled with a different species of human being that has had judgment magically removed from their minds. You'll be judged in the grocery store, the post office, at work, walking down the street, sitting in a restaurant - basically anywhere you go. There are judgmental and non-judgmental people in any gym/workout environment. The only way to avoid it is to either work out at home, or find a gym which has individual, isolated cubicles where you can work out without anybody else seeing you - or that only allows one person in at a time.

    The vast majority of people in any given gym are far less judgmental than the people you're around in your life the remainder of the time. Even the most fit people there started out unfit at some point, and have traversed a long, hard road to get to where they are. They understand what a newbie goes through, because they were there once too. If they notice you to any extent beyond a fleeting glance while they're busy with their own workout, the thought is most likely that they're happy to see you taking that first step and trying to improve yourself. Basically the only way anybody is judged negatively in a gym is if you're doing something stupid and/or purposely drawing attention to yourself. And about 90% of the people in any given gym are just as insecure and worried about judgment as you are.

    Gyms are not places filled with superhuman people. They're the same people you deal with every day as you go about your life.

    Yep, I feel the people that join PF because of "gym-intimidation" (as opposed to has stuff they, need, location, price, etc.) are intimidated/have social anxiety issues in a lot of situation in addition to a gym.

    Then why is it so awful that there are gyms that make a point of trying to allay those anxieties so that those people might actually have a place where they will exercise? Because if you're right about their general social anxiety issues, the alternative for those people if places like PF didn't exist wouldn't be going to a gym that doesn't market itself that way. And it won't be going outside for a walk or a run. At best, it might be working out to a video at home. Maybe.

    My only problem with it is when people need to talk about how great PF is because it lacks all these horrible things that other gyms supposedly have. It's falsely representing how other gyms are, and creating fear among people that in other gyms they will be treated badly. If someone wants to ignore the obnoxious marketing and go to PF because it's convenient, open 24/7, or is cheap, I certainly don't care.

    It's all the posts about how PF is better because it's clean, or lacks people who treat you rudely, or doesn't have obnoxious gym rats or has equipment available or whatnot when I find it slightly annoying. So do other gyms, plus in many cases other things PF does not have (and yes, that many people might not want).

    My gym is more expensive than PF (PF isn't near my home or office so isn't an option, but there are cheaper gyms that are). I pay for that because it has some things that are worth it to me. I don't go on MFP and go on about how my gym is better than other gyms, or claim the people are nicer or that other gyms would be icky, and it kind of bugs me when PF fans do that -- I think it's as common as people being negative about PF, and I also think people are ONLY negative about PF because it has intentionally "us against them" advertising. Too bad that in this day "us against them" seems to be the way to make money, ick.

    I am not and have never been a PF member. The ads I see on TV emphasize the low cost and the always-open aspect.

    But there are other types of ads, which are what people take issue with here.

    I also note that much of the defense from people who attend PF is not merely the hours and cost (which are great, I get why someone would join), but "at my gym no one comes and harasses you or grunts a lot, and things are clean." The implication is that that is not the case at other gyms, and that mistaken and largely ill-informed and based on scare-mongering by PF claim is what I am objecting to.
    I just don't get the point of getting all bent out of shape over marketing or forum chattering that makes it clear I'm not the target audience for that product or service.

    Like I said, I think it's divisive and insulting and an "us vs. them" approach which I find destructive, as well as disingenuous. I think it's certainly worth expressing objection to, and it's not okay just because it is profitable. I find it puzzling that people can defend it.

    I'm obviously not saying it is bad to go to PF. Low cost and good hours are great.
    I think the appropriate pushback to "PF is better because people at other gyms are means" is to say that "in fact people at other gyms are not mean. Most of them are, most of the time, indifferent to you because they're there doing their own thing, and as long as you are nice -- i.e., abide by basic kindergarten rules like put your toys away and don't spread your bodily fluids around the classroom -- they will be nice to you when you interact with them."

    Thank you for your advice. I believe that if you read upthread I and others did, in fact, say this.