Trail runners: what do you carry with you?

I went to a search and rescue fundraiser tonight. One of the topics of discussion was fast and light trail running. Because MFP is a place people come to for knowledge and inspiration, and because running can be a great help in weight loss, I thought maybe I should start a thread.

If anything happens, if you're able to call for help, it will be several hours before it arrives. The next day in all likelihood. It's a good idea to carry enough to make it through an unplanned night out. (You don't have to carry enough to make it a comfortable night.)
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Replies

  • andysport1
    andysport1 Posts: 572 Member
    A silver blanket
    Energy bars
    A heat pad
    A compass
    A GPS tracker/satellite phone
    A beacon buddy tracker and alert.

    When I run on road I carry
    A GPS tracker/satellite phone
    A beacon buddy tracker and alert.
    In winter
    Silver blanket and heat pad
  • RhiAnLewis17
    RhiAnLewis17 Posts: 2,299 Member
    Glad someone has started a thread like this, I recently started doing a bit of this sort of running and would love to hear tips to keep myself safe, especially because I go alone.
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited December 2018
    I normally carry:

    2*500ml bottles of either water or electrolyte fluid
    Mobile phone
    First aid kit
    Energy bar - Spare
    Spare base layer top, tights and socks.
    In winter; hat and gloves
    2-3 buffs
    Space blanket
    Gels or chews for run fueling
    Brufen tablets
    My race best has a built in whistle
    Rain jacket and trousers
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,967 Member
    When I hiked from Easy Pass to Colonial Creek, I ran into a group of trail runners. They were the only humans I saw until the end of the trip three days later. They had large, full packs.

    One thing they said last night was bring your phone. Don't expect it to have reception, but there's a much better chance of finding you quickly if you have it because it will occasionally be able to ping a tower.
  • FL_Hiker
    FL_Hiker Posts: 919 Member
    Our trails here are very accessible, i only carry the basics. Water, a couple gu, and a weapon. I usually run into people in trucks and off road vehicles on the trail.
  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
    edited December 2018
    Mostly I just take extra water and something to keep me warm. I’m working on the principle that when I fall down the side of the cliff/gorge, I may have several hours to wait (even in my nearest trail which is barely ten minutes from the city centre) until mountain rescue can find me, so water is a good thing to have.

    Lately I’ve been thinking about how I often go off places without telling anyone my route or where I am. Really what I should have as a minimum is:

    Water
    Emergency blanket/bivvy (probably going to get an emergency bothy if only so when I walk with a friend we have somewhere sheltered for a sandwich stop)
    Mobile phone
    Head torch
    Additional warm layers - top and bottom, should be windproof minimum and preferably waterproof.
    A high calorie snack.

    Basically I am looking at whatever is mandatory for a fell/mountain race, and will go with that.

    Plus leaving some info about where I’m going and how long I’ll be. It’s great to have anonymity, but when no one quite knows where you went for the day, and police find your car, that can lead to many hours of people searching and heartache.
  • Tacklewasher
    Tacklewasher Posts: 7,122 Member
    sarahthes wrote: »
    My trails actually run through the heart of the city. So I will bring water depending on season (I'm not doing super long distances so I dont need it in the winter and it will just freeze anyway). Maybe some gummies. And my cell phone.
    uztddxnpvgiv.jpg

    This was in the middle of the city. Single track criss-crosses the forest all around the double wide track. Start and end point was Starbucks!

    Same here. Only thing I might take on the trail is a bear bell. Otherwise I expect to see people and don't fuss with overnight provisions.
  • L1zardQueen
    L1zardQueen Posts: 8,756 Member
    Dog poopy bags and the car keys. Imma loser.
  • noblsheep
    noblsheep Posts: 580 Member
    For a day out and I don't expect to run into many people

    1L of water
    Gels, food etc.
    Space blanket
    Phone and external battery
    Extra layer

    If there's any possibility of nightfall

    Another 1L of water
    Headlamp
    Bear bell
    First aid supplies
  • Barfly57
    Barfly57 Posts: 333 Member
    Y'all might consider carrying a whistle; you don't have to get too far off trail before you're invisible.
  • Where are you guys running that you need to carry space blankets? Are you guys doing ultra training or something? Seriously I"m curious
  • Sambo_fitness
    Sambo_fitness Posts: 137 Member
    When I am alone, whether it is walking in my neighborhood or a new area, I carry a pocket knife with me. Crazy people are out there!
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,870 Member
    edited December 2018
    Where are you guys running that you need to carry space blankets? Are you guys doing ultra training or something? Seriously I"m curious

    Even a mile from my house I go offroad and can be ten miles or so until I hit anonther one. And if you get injured, exposure is a real risk. It's pretty heavily wooded around me.

    And I'm a marathon/ ultra runner
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    I carry a knife, towel, whistle, glow stick, matches, small first aid kit, flashlight, mobile phone, drink, energy bar, space blanket.

    I had a compound fracture on a mtn bike trail and had to crawl back 1 mile and climb up a 100 ft. cliff until a ranger found me. Learned that lesson well and let people know where I'm going and for how long. Also keep a kit to help myself and others on the trail. When I'm on the bike I have a compact set of tools on me as well.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    When I hiked from Easy Pass to Colonial Creek, I ran into a group of trail runners. They were the only humans I saw until the end of the trip three days later. They had large, full packs.

    One thing they said last night was bring your phone. Don't expect it to have reception, but there's a much better chance of finding you quickly if you have it because it will occasionally be able to ping a tower.

    I invested in a sat phone and have an old reliable CB radio that I take out on longer treks and make sure I check in with the ranger station with my hike plan. Cell service is absolutely not reliable out in the wilderness or at elevation.
  • furmickc
    furmickc Posts: 43 Member
    Water, Gu, whistle. And I make sure that people know where I'm going and when I should be back (I do that on roads too, now that I think about it) I live in the south, and aren't on remote trails. If I were in the mountains, or more technical trails, I'd 100% bring a space blanket. I do ultras.
  • GiddyupTim
    GiddyupTim Posts: 2,819 Member
    Dog poopy bags and the car keys. Imma loser.

    Are not.
  • Rocknut53
    Rocknut53 Posts: 1,795 Member
    Where are you guys running that you need to carry space blankets? Are you guys doing ultra training or something? Seriously I"m curious

    I know a woman who is a competitive trail runner and her runs typically take her from trailhead to peaks 10+ miles in, a gain of several thousand feet in elevation, no cell service. Last fall she was coming back down and tripped and jammed her hip so bad it shattered her hip socket. This is a trail that doesn't get much traffic on most days, it was raining and she didn't have much with her. Her saving grace was that the people who found her were doctors, one an orthopedic surgeon. They carried her out as there was no way to call for a helicopter. She is just now getting out of her wheel chair and able to walk a few steps. Living in the mountains I see women all the time doing just this sort of activity, totally unprepared for what may happen and I just cringe. I'd rather carry a little extra weight and be prepared. Plus a heavier pack makes for a harder workout!