Someone said I am "pushing myself" and I find that sad

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Replies

  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,297 Member
    You mentioned vertigo. This can be a symptom of an inner ear infection not related to your physical ability. Taken to an extreme it could be a symptom of Meniere which has more symptoms with it. If you were to have an inner ear infection it could account for your thinking you have been sharp with in a way you would otherwise have not been. Please take care of yourself.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
    Pushing yourself is relative to where you are at the moment. What might have been easy for someone at one time could push them to the brink at another point in life, the fact of what you did in the past is not your baseline forever.
    However, I doubt that pushing yourself too much leads to vertigo.
  • heybales
    heybales Posts: 18,842 Member
    There's also a workup for the human body to be doing what could be seen as limits of human body.
    Or frankly, limits of the human body you happen to have at the moment.

    Someone that's been chair bound for years and is still with some sort of disease could be pushing themselves beyond really their limit by attempting to walk around the block.

    The effect being seen as feet so messed up they have to stay off them for a few days, actually could have some mini-fractures (friend just dealt with that, now in double boots for 6 wks), or tendons/ligaments needing many days of recovery, ect.

    Was that pushing beyond the limit.

    So from that vantage point, perhaps person heard of issues you were having, and not really knowing your full schedule and means - thought pushing it too much.

    Then again - probably didn't give that much thought to their comment, so they were just spouting basically something they'd heard before.
  • lorrpb
    lorrpb Posts: 11,464 Member
    I’m curious based on this and somenorhrt threads/comments.

    How do you feel about people who have health and fitness goals that do not ever include (or have any desire to include) pushing or working at the limits of what a human body may be capable of doing?

    That’s very poorly worded, but I get the sense that you have particular views on those who aren’t working to push the limits of the human body-or working up to that as a long term goal.

    That's perfectly fine. I see no reason that everyone's goal should be to push their body to the human limit.
  • Duck_Puddle
    Duck_Puddle Posts: 3,224 Member
    edited December 2018
    lorrpb wrote: »
    I’m curious based on this and somenorhrt threads/comments.

    How do you feel about people who have health and fitness goals that do not ever include (or have any desire to include) pushing or working at the limits of what a human body may be capable of doing?

    That’s very poorly worded, but I get the sense that you have particular views on those who aren’t working to push the limits of the human body-or working up to that as a long term goal.

    That's perfectly fine. I see no reason that everyone's goal should be to push their body to the human limit.

    I agree. I think OP does not and many other posts kind of indicate he feels pretty strongly about it. That’s why I was asking his thoughts on that.

    I edited that to hopefully make it more clear that I’m asking the OP’s thoughts.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,413 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    OP- I’m curious based on this and some other threads/comments.

    How do you feel about people who have health and fitness goals that do not ever include (or have any desire to include) pushing or working at the limits of what a human body may be capable of doing?

    That’s very poorly worded, but I get the sense that you have particular views on those who aren’t working to push the limits of the human body-or working up to that as a long term goal.

    Hmm, I guess I'll give that a two part answer. The first is the Socrates quote "No man has a right to be an amateur in the matter of physical training. What a shame it is for a man to grow old without seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable"

    The second part: everyone should be active in some form or fashion and have a basic understanding of fitness and nutrition. I have a friend who is super into skating and eats right. I think he's a scrawny git who could stand to pack on 40 pounds, but that's just an opinion, I know he is very healthy, and I have no problem with his fitness levels. It doesn't matter to me if you're a runner, a lifter, a crossfitter, or just active. (I worry about their form and joints but it's not a bad thing) I do truly believe that almost everyone would benefit from lifting weights - they don't necessarily have to take it super seriously, but squats, deads, benches, ohp, and bodyweight stuff like pushups, dips and pull ups are for everyone barring some injury that prevents them.

    So much the bolded. One of the main reasons people have to go to assisted living is because they can't get off the toilet.

    I have a grandfather who is deteriorating fast because he refuses to eat right or leave his apartment, partially because he probably can't make it 50 steps. If he were to do 3 sets of 10-20 chair sit squats every other day and eat a balanced meal plan that is a slightly above his TDEE (I've offered several times to make him one), his muscle atrophy would all but dissapear.

    It is sad. Have you tried so sort of protein shake with him to get the protein and calories in? So many ways you can mix that stuff up he probably wouldn't know it was good for him
  • cariwaldick
    cariwaldick Posts: 189 Member
    What I've noticed is that when we start out on the road to fitness, everyone is supportive. Then as we start reaching goals, looking better, and making it a priority and focus, that support can change. Some people get worried that we're doing it wrong, or might have unrealistic goals. Once you hear a couple of those comments it can start to sound like criticism, or jealousy. I can understand some irrational anger at first. But you didn't let it go.

    Men typically aren't good listeners when it comes to venting. They want to weigh in and come up with a solution--even if it's wrong. I suspect your sedentary friend did just that, and you took it harder than intended.

    You're right that it is sad that society doesn't see enough value in fitness. But to be fair, even though the human body can and often does handle a crap-ton of stress and exertion, it's not always good to do so. The motto is "That which does not kill us makes us stronger," but sometimes it does kill us. Sometimes it does damage that can't be repaired, or takes a long time to heal. I'm not a doctor, so I can't say what causes vertigo, but it's a good idea to listen to your body when it's telling you something is wrong.

    Maybe your friend and people here took it the wrong way. But you did list your injuries and interests, and you sound like you do push yourself. Whether it's too much or too hard is between you and your doctor.