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tool to choose the right exercise program

oat_branoat_bran Posts: 321Member Member Posts: 321Member Member
So I know there's a thread somewhere around here that is supposed to help beginners choose a lifting program, but I personally didn't find it that helpful. It seems to simply list different beginner lifting routines/programs and you have to manually look through each of them and try to understand if it's right for you. It doesn't seem to take each person's goal into consideration and most of them don't work for me for one reason or another.

So I was wondering if anyone knows of a good tool online that can determine the best workout program (in particular for strength training) that is adjusted for the person's particular situation (person's goals, what kind of physical activity they do day to day already, times per week they can exercise, what kind of equipment they have access to etc).

For example, I already have climbing practices twice a week and do some light running and swimming on top of that, I have access to gym only twice a week, and it's a uni gym and has a limited range of machines and equipment, can't do any high impact exercises at home and don't own (and can't afford at the moment) any equipment besides two 3kg dumbbells. My goals are to maintain lean body mass while I lose weight, get stronger overall, but in particular get stronger to improve my climbing performance.

I know it's probably too much to expect, but It would be cool if I could just answer a few questions and end up with a program adapted to my situation or a list of programs that could work...

Replies

  • Roadie2000Roadie2000 Posts: 1,799Member Member Posts: 1,799Member Member
    That's pretty tough to do since everybody's schedule, goals, and what they have access to will be so different.

    Sounds like you just need to look for a 2 day per week strength training program, you maybe need to browse through a few you have access to all of the equipment you need. There are plenty of apps and websites that have sample programs, I don't know which ones are any good though. Just do a little research and find one that looks feasible, and if you're into climbing you can research what exercises would help with that, and maybe tweak your program accordingly.
  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Posts: 1,594Member Member Posts: 1,594Member Member
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.
  • ritzvinritzvin Posts: 2,359Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,359Member, Premium Member
    For a beginner going twice a week, pretty much any beginner full body program (none of the fancy complicated split programs)... At the most basic, you'd be doing a leg (typicially alternating between quad-dominant and hamstring-dominant), a push, and a pull movement each session for some number of sets and reps. If you want something super simple and effective: https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/ (requires access to barbell and/or dumbbells - I'm assuming the gym at least has dumbells of varying weight, if no barbells you may have to find an alternative like a leg press machine to replace the squats). I found the book Starting Strength (Rippetoe) useful for learning and checking form on the barbell lifts. (3kg dumbbells will be pretty much useless - although I have occasionally found my old Barbie weights to be useful for holding baggies of meat underwater to thaw). If you list some of the equipment available, somewhere here might be able to make some suggestions on alternate options.

    The programs are pretty much all going to be setup to make all the major muscle groups stronger - not really something that needs to be particularly targeted to specific goals (excepting some of the more women-targeted programs that add extra glute work). ie they'll have you doing roughly the same movements, just with different equipment. In your case (for the climbing), you might want to do extra grip work (farmer carries/rack pulls/etc) on non-deadlift days (deadlifts will also work grip and can be a limiting factor in that lift). Climbing stores also often carry devices for exercising grip. The other major muscles used for climbing will be worked in the main lifts of every full body program.
  • pondee629pondee629 Posts: 2,232Member Member Posts: 2,232Member Member
    The "tool to choose the right exercise program" is you/your body. Everyone is different, everyone has different goals and starting points. The only true measure of the "rightness" of a workout program is how well it works with/for you and how much you enjoy doing it. Try one for a couple of weeks. (Try to make a reasonably informed choice based on the available information) If it works, continue. If it does not, try another.
  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Posts: 1,594Member Member Posts: 1,594Member Member
    One more link; here is a fella who has a gym focused specifically on climbers. He is training professionals with a lot more intensity and variation than what is in Stronglifts, but all the classic compound lifts are there, along with some "weights" you could source on your own.

    "The best thing I can do for my athletes is get them stronger. Strength is the foundation of athletic ability, and I saw it as not only increasing performance, but also adding durability, or resistance to injury.

    I do not train body builders or power lifters. I understand that mountain athletes must not only be strong, but also light to move well on rock and snow. I aim to get them stronger without making them heavier.

    As a result our strength goals revolve around relative strength—that is, strength in proportion to body weight. My strength standards for men include a 2x body-weight dead lift, 1.5x body-weight front squat and bench press, 1.25x body-weight power clean, 1x body-weight military press, twenty strict body-weight pull-ups, and forty strict body-weight dips (strict meaning full range of motion; no cheating).

    Dead lifts, front squats, power cleans and push presses—the classic barbell exercises for developing full body strength—formed the cornerstone of my strength-training program. We drilled body-weight pull-ups, push-ups and dips to begin developing upper-body strength. I have a dozen body-weight and loaded mid-section exercises that often employ kettlebells for improving core strength.

    Strongman training complemented classic barbell and body-weight strength training exercises. My athletes drag tires, throw sledgehammers, sprint with sand bags and walk carrying heavy rocks.

    Both male and female athletes do the same exercises."

    http://www.alpinist.com/doc/web08x/wfeature-mountain-athlete-training

  • kimny72kimny72 Posts: 11,212Member Member Posts: 11,212Member Member
    The other option would be to hire a PT who perhaps specializes working with climbers for a short time, who would understand what gaps and overages you may have in your current routine.

    I believe most programs are products that would like to be bought, so an objective tool that would collate and investigate all of them and then promote one to each individual would be highly unlikely to exist.
  • cwolfman13cwolfman13 Posts: 35,827Member Member Posts: 35,827Member Member
    oat_bran wrote: »
    So I know there's a thread somewhere around here that is supposed to help beginners choose a lifting program, but I personally didn't find it that helpful. It seems to simply list different beginner lifting routines/programs and you have to manually look through each of them and try to understand if it's right for you. It doesn't seem to take each person's goal into consideration and most of them don't work for me for one reason or another.

    So I was wondering if anyone knows of a good tool online that can determine the best workout program (in particular for strength training) that is adjusted for the person's particular situation (person's goals, what kind of physical activity they do day to day already, times per week they can exercise, what kind of equipment they have access to etc).

    For example, I already have climbing practices twice a week and do some light running and swimming on top of that, I have access to gym only twice a week, and it's a uni gym and has a limited range of machines and equipment, can't do any high impact exercises at home and don't own (and can't afford at the moment) any equipment besides two 3kg dumbbells. My goals are to maintain lean body mass while I lose weight, get stronger overall, but in particular get stronger to improve my climbing performance.

    I know it's probably too much to expect, but It would be cool if I could just answer a few questions and end up with a program adapted to my situation or a list of programs that could work...

    It does though...all of those programs address different goals...ie, something like strong lifts is for someone who wants to maximize strength...something like New Rules of Lifting for Women is a broad, more overall fitness oriented program, etc.

    Your best bet would be to get a PT...there really isn't an app or tool out there that will give you anything like that.
  • tsazanitsazani Posts: 591Member Member Posts: 591Member Member
    I recommend 7 basic resistance exercises. Dead lifts, squats, pullups, rows, bench press, shoulder press and planks.

    You could do this 2 or 3 times per week. 20-30 min duration.

    Everything else is window dressing or unnecessary complication.
  • oat_branoat_bran Posts: 321Member Member Posts: 321Member Member
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.

    Thanks for the ideas and for the links! My gym does have the basics so a program like Stronglifts should be suitable for me. I already heard about this program by the way, it looks simple but effective. I also have a pull-up bar at home but at the moment can't do a single pull-up. I'm trying to do lat pull-downs at the gym and add weight gradually in hopes to be able to pull up my own weight.
  • oat_branoat_bran Posts: 321Member Member Posts: 321Member Member
    ritzvin wrote: »
    For a beginner going twice a week, pretty much any beginner full body program (none of the fancy complicated split programs)... At the most basic, you'd be doing a leg (typicially alternating between quad-dominant and hamstring-dominant), a push, and a pull movement each session for some number of sets and reps. If you want something super simple and effective: https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/the-beginner-weight-training-workout-routine/ (requires access to barbell and/or dumbbells - I'm assuming the gym at least has dumbells of varying weight, if no barbells you may have to find an alternative like a leg press machine to replace the squats). I found the book Starting Strength (Rippetoe) useful for learning and checking form on the barbell lifts. (3kg dumbbells will be pretty much useless - although I have occasionally found my old Barbie weights to be useful for holding baggies of meat underwater to thaw). If you list some of the equipment available, somewhere here might be able to make some suggestions on alternate options.

    The programs are pretty much all going to be setup to make all the major muscle groups stronger - not really something that needs to be particularly targeted to specific goals (excepting some of the more women-targeted programs that add extra glute work). ie they'll have you doing roughly the same movements, just with different equipment. In your case (for the climbing), you might want to do extra grip work (farmer carries/rack pulls/etc) on non-deadlift days (deadlifts will also work grip and can be a limiting factor in that lift). Climbing stores also often carry devices for exercising grip. The other major muscles used for climbing will be worked in the main lifts of every full body program.

    Thanks for the link! I really like how this workout looks. I think I'm going to go either with this one or with Stronglifts. I like that the author offers alternatives to each exercises in case you don't have that particular equipment or can't do the classic version yet.

    And I'm probably gonna add some extra exercises specifically for climbing, like you said, maybe farmer's walks, wrist curls or something like that.
  • oat_branoat_bran Posts: 321Member Member Posts: 321Member Member
    One more link; here is a fella who has a gym focused specifically on climbers. He is training professionals with a lot more intensity and variation than what is in Stronglifts, but all the classic compound lifts are there, along with some "weights" you could source on your own.

    "The best thing I can do for my athletes is get them stronger. Strength is the foundation of athletic ability, and I saw it as not only increasing performance, but also adding durability, or resistance to injury.

    I do not train body builders or power lifters. I understand that mountain athletes must not only be strong, but also light to move well on rock and snow. I aim to get them stronger without making them heavier.

    As a result our strength goals revolve around relative strength—that is, strength in proportion to body weight. My strength standards for men include a 2x body-weight dead lift, 1.5x body-weight front squat and bench press, 1.25x body-weight power clean, 1x body-weight military press, twenty strict body-weight pull-ups, and forty strict body-weight dips (strict meaning full range of motion; no cheating).

    Dead lifts, front squats, power cleans and push presses—the classic barbell exercises for developing full body strength—formed the cornerstone of my strength-training program. We drilled body-weight pull-ups, push-ups and dips to begin developing upper-body strength. I have a dozen body-weight and loaded mid-section exercises that often employ kettlebells for improving core strength.

    Strongman training complemented classic barbell and body-weight strength training exercises. My athletes drag tires, throw sledgehammers, sprint with sand bags and walk carrying heavy rocks.

    Both male and female athletes do the same exercises."

    http://www.alpinist.com/doc/web08x/wfeature-mountain-athlete-training

    Great link! Thank you! I'm a beginner climber and not planning to do it on athletic level so I probably don't need some of the most advanced stuff, but the basic tips seem very helpful!
  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Posts: 1,594Member Member Posts: 1,594Member Member
    oat_bran wrote: »
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.

    Thanks for the ideas and for the links! My gym does have the basics so a program like Stronglifts should be suitable for me. I already heard about this program by the way, it looks simple but effective. I also have a pull-up bar at home but at the moment can't do a single pull-up. I'm trying to do lat pull-downs at the gym and add weight gradually in hopes to be able to pull up my own weight.


    I thought about you this weekend. We went to a Y that has a tall climbing wall with 4 different belay options. My 9 year old son is a dirtbag in training; he goes all over the different routes like a spider. As in the past, I make it 15 feet up and my hands start sweating and I get really nervous and can't make it through a section of smaller holds. A chalk bag and the right shoes would probably help, but I think the biggest challenge is mental--I just need to trust the belay. And also could probably work more on my upper body strength and finger grip, although I can do pullups for several reps with 6# assistance, but obviously it's not making things any easier for me. I am not normally a wuss about heights. Anyways I ran and hid in the weight room. :D

    With your pull up bar, you can also work on negative pull ups (starting in full pull-up position and slowly lowering yourself) and general hanging, lifting yourself part way, lifting and reaching with your legs, just literally monkeying around.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 1,540Member Member Posts: 1,540Member Member
    oat_bran wrote: »
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.

    Thanks for the ideas and for the links! My gym does have the basics so a program like Stronglifts should be suitable for me. I already heard about this program by the way, it looks simple but effective. I also have a pull-up bar at home but at the moment can't do a single pull-up. I'm trying to do lat pull-downs at the gym and add weight gradually in hopes to be able to pull up my own weight.


    I thought about you this weekend. We went to a Y that has a tall climbing wall with 4 different belay options. My 9 year old son is a dirtbag in training; he goes all over the different routes like a spider. As in the past, I make it 15 feet up and my hands start sweating and I get really nervous and can't make it through a section of smaller holds. A chalk bag and the right shoes would probably help, but I think the biggest challenge is mental--I just need to trust the belay. And also could probably work more on my upper body strength and finger grip, although I can do pullups for several reps with 6# assistance, but obviously it's not making things any easier for me. I am not normally a wuss about heights. Anyways I ran and hid in the weight room. :D

    With your pull up bar, you can also work on negative pull ups (starting in full pull-up position and slowly lowering yourself) and general hanging, lifting yourself part way, lifting and reaching with your legs, just literally monkeying around.

    The issue is probably part mental and part technique. I climbed competitively as a preteen/teen for 3 years and have seen a number of adults (and a few kids) be very very nervous climbing. Strength will come as one keeps climbing (as will technique), but anxiety makes climbing with even close to good technique really difficult, which makes total sense. I deal with this myself with rowing all. the. time.

    Of course the right equipment would also be helpful (so yes, climbing shoes).
  • French_PeasantFrench_Peasant Posts: 1,594Member Member Posts: 1,594Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    oat_bran wrote: »
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.

    Thanks for the ideas and for the links! My gym does have the basics so a program like Stronglifts should be suitable for me. I already heard about this program by the way, it looks simple but effective. I also have a pull-up bar at home but at the moment can't do a single pull-up. I'm trying to do lat pull-downs at the gym and add weight gradually in hopes to be able to pull up my own weight.


    I thought about you this weekend. We went to a Y that has a tall climbing wall with 4 different belay options. My 9 year old son is a dirtbag in training; he goes all over the different routes like a spider. As in the past, I make it 15 feet up and my hands start sweating and I get really nervous and can't make it through a section of smaller holds. A chalk bag and the right shoes would probably help, but I think the biggest challenge is mental--I just need to trust the belay. And also could probably work more on my upper body strength and finger grip, although I can do pullups for several reps with 6# assistance, but obviously it's not making things any easier for me. I am not normally a wuss about heights. Anyways I ran and hid in the weight room. :D

    With your pull up bar, you can also work on negative pull ups (starting in full pull-up position and slowly lowering yourself) and general hanging, lifting yourself part way, lifting and reaching with your legs, just literally monkeying around.

    The issue is probably part mental and part technique. I climbed competitively as a preteen/teen for 3 years and have seen a number of adults (and a few kids) be very very nervous climbing. Strength will come as one keeps climbing (as will technique), but anxiety makes climbing with even close to good technique really difficult, which makes total sense. I deal with this myself with rowing all. the. time.

    Of course the right equipment would also be helpful (so yes, climbing shoes).

    Yeah, I secretly want to conquer the climb now, but if I get the shoes and chalk bag then I am actually going to be admitting it. The only thing worse than failing in front of everyone at the Y is failing with all the fancy equipment. :D My son LOVES it when I get my butt up on the wall with him though, and it is an excellent workout.
  • aokoyeaokoye Posts: 1,540Member Member Posts: 1,540Member Member
    aokoye wrote: »
    oat_bran wrote: »
    Your goals are so specialized and unique, I don't think you can expect any kind of tool that has an algorithm to provide a satisfactory answer. I would talk with or research a variety of other climbers who are in the shape you are aspiring to be in, and build a training regimen based on what they are suggesting.

    Since you are already climbing twice a week, off the cuff I would recommend the Stronglifts 5x5 program. Your work on the wall is going to replicate many of the accessory lifts that can be in a more complicated program. Stronglifts strips it down to the simplest essentials for developing strength: deadlift, squat, overhead press, bent over row, and bench press. (I personally do not agree with one deadlift set and would probably do more, but I am doing Romanian deadlifts to save wear and tear on my knees anyways). (Also I am assuming your gym has the utter basics, like a barbell and a squat rack).

    I would also install a pull up bar at home, or if you can't do that (or maybe even better than that) go do pullups (and one handed pullups, and two-finger pullups, and different hangs using two fingers and a toe, LOL) down at your local playground.

    I have NO idea what to even suggest you can do with the KBs you have. If you are successfully doing a wall, I can't think of any lifts that would even be challenging. Maybe use them for arm circles, front crossovers, 50 lat raises, hold them while you do a bunch of jump squats and jump lunges. (If those are too high impact for your home, do them down at the playground too.)

    I looked up Tommy Caldwall's training, just as an example, and found reference to weight lifting, but couldn't find the specifics (I didn't try too hard so maybe you could find it with some digging). Mostly he is practicing on a wall in his parent's garage that he built when he was 13, fingerboarding, bouldering, and then practicing for hours at a gym.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/climbing/comments/2sgo9l/tommy_caldwells_training_routine/

    https://www.si.com/edge/2019/01/09/tommy-caldwell-climbing-workouts-fitness-training-routine

    I think the bottom line is, if you want to get better at climbing, you need to do more climbing. But a basic lifting program can help you develop that core strength, and monkey bars can help you develop that strength and agility you need to pull yourself up and hang from the wall.

    Thanks for the ideas and for the links! My gym does have the basics so a program like Stronglifts should be suitable for me. I already heard about this program by the way, it looks simple but effective. I also have a pull-up bar at home but at the moment can't do a single pull-up. I'm trying to do lat pull-downs at the gym and add weight gradually in hopes to be able to pull up my own weight.


    I thought about you this weekend. We went to a Y that has a tall climbing wall with 4 different belay options. My 9 year old son is a dirtbag in training; he goes all over the different routes like a spider. As in the past, I make it 15 feet up and my hands start sweating and I get really nervous and can't make it through a section of smaller holds. A chalk bag and the right shoes would probably help, but I think the biggest challenge is mental--I just need to trust the belay. And also could probably work more on my upper body strength and finger grip, although I can do pullups for several reps with 6# assistance, but obviously it's not making things any easier for me. I am not normally a wuss about heights. Anyways I ran and hid in the weight room. :D

    With your pull up bar, you can also work on negative pull ups (starting in full pull-up position and slowly lowering yourself) and general hanging, lifting yourself part way, lifting and reaching with your legs, just literally monkeying around.

    The issue is probably part mental and part technique. I climbed competitively as a preteen/teen for 3 years and have seen a number of adults (and a few kids) be very very nervous climbing. Strength will come as one keeps climbing (as will technique), but anxiety makes climbing with even close to good technique really difficult, which makes total sense. I deal with this myself with rowing all. the. time.

    Of course the right equipment would also be helpful (so yes, climbing shoes).

    Yeah, I secretly want to conquer the climb now, but if I get the shoes and chalk bag then I am actually going to be admitting it. The only thing worse than failing in front of everyone at the Y is failing with all the fancy equipment. :D My son LOVES it when I get my butt up on the wall with him though, and it is an excellent workout.

    This totally sounds like a mashup of conversations that I have with a friend of mine who is also a novice rower. I'm anxious because the unstable motion makes me nervous and thus the anxiety affects my technique (which is already a mess because I'm a beginner). Her anxiety about being the weakest link affects her ability to focus on technique (and again, she's a novice as well).

    Both of us, however, have apparently admitted to ourselves that we actually enjoy this sport and that it's not worth giving up.
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