Second day of OMAD, having real trouble

I am light headed today on my second day of omad. But I really don't want to quit. :(

Replies

  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    I started it yesterday and I did not really count how much did I eat for that meal. But I honestly don't think it was how much I am supposed to eat. I had 6 california rolls, a little bit of sticky rice with teriyaki chicken and 2 chicken nanbans with a coconut chiller. Should it be more than 1200, IDK. Should not I am guessing. Today is my second day, yesterday was not this bad. Today it is making me lightheaded and I really feel like getting some sleep right now but I am in my work and I don't want to quit.
  • bernadettenz
    bernadettenz Posts: 252 Member
    Why would you be eating like this if it is not how you naturally eat? Just don't do it.
    I have eaten like this most of my life, but I wouldn't if it didn't suit me. You shouldn't be miserable.
    All the best.
  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    You don't need to do OMAD if it's making things harder for you.
    You don't need to do OMAD if you're having trouble eating enough calories.

    If you don't want to quit, don't do things that are harder than they need to be. The easier you make it on yourself the more likely you are to continue doing it. All you need to lose weight is to eat fewer calories than your body burns throughout the day, everything else is personal preference and personal tweaking to make things easier.

    Here are some of the things I tried and how I tweaked them to my preference:
    - I tried OMAD, didn't like it because I'm happier eating more often and I hate eating all of my needed protein in one meal. No need to be stubborn, I quit doing it. I did pick up the strategy of eating all of my calories in one meal occasionally when I know I will be eating something that is too high in calories to fit into my typical diet in satisfying amounts.

    - I tried IF, but I didn't like the clock watching and increased hunger, so I stopped doing it. I did pick up the strategy of delaying my breakfast until I'm first hungry in the morning. No clock watching needed.

    - I tried low carb and didn't like the hunger, the food, and the inability to eat what I wanted, so I stopped doing it. It did help me be more okay with including more fat in my diet whenever I want.

    - I tried sticking to macros, but it made me too obsessive. Now I just eat whatever I want, but I keep an eye on protein and introduce extra bits of it here and there whenever I can without obsessing or trying to hit an extra high target.

    My eating habit is very unhealthy. And I probably eat a lot more than my TDEE in normal life. I binge ate every other day the last few months and gained 15kg. I want to lose at least 8 to 10kg and when i eat 500 calories less than my TDEE to lose weight, I dont normally stick to it and end up binge eating again. This is like a cycle. I think I can never lose the weight if I don't do something extreme.
  • amusedmonkey
    amusedmonkey Posts: 10,331 Member
    edited March 2019
    You don't need to do OMAD if it's making things harder for you.
    You don't need to do OMAD if you're having trouble eating enough calories.

    If you don't want to quit, don't do things that are harder than they need to be. The easier you make it on yourself the more likely you are to continue doing it. All you need to lose weight is to eat fewer calories than your body burns throughout the day, everything else is personal preference and personal tweaking to make things easier.

    Here are some of the things I tried and how I tweaked them to my preference:
    - I tried OMAD, didn't like it because I'm happier eating more often and I hate eating all of my needed protein in one meal. No need to be stubborn, I quit doing it. I did pick up the strategy of eating all of my calories in one meal occasionally when I know I will be eating something that is too high in calories to fit into my typical diet in satisfying amounts.

    - I tried IF, but I didn't like the clock watching and increased hunger, so I stopped doing it. I did pick up the strategy of delaying my breakfast until I'm first hungry in the morning. No clock watching needed.

    - I tried low carb and didn't like the hunger, the food, and the inability to eat what I wanted, so I stopped doing it. It did help me be more okay with including more fat in my diet whenever I want.

    - I tried sticking to macros, but it made me too obsessive. Now I just eat whatever I want, but I keep an eye on protein and introduce extra bits of it here and there whenever I can without obsessing or trying to hit an extra high target.

    My eating habit is very unhealthy. And I probably eat a lot more than my TDEE in normal life. I binge ate every other day the last few months and gained 15kg. I want to lose at least 8 to 10kg and when i eat 500 calories less than my TDEE to lose weight, I dont normally stick to it and end up binge eating again. This is like a cycle. I think I can never lose the weight if I don't do something extreme.

    That's problematic thinking. You may do something extreme and lose weight but ignore the source of the problem and fail to develop long lasting strategies, which means regaining what you lost. I know everything about eating more that TDEE. I used to be super morbidly obese, by that, I mean more than 50 kg overweight. The only thing that worked is the very slow introduction of small habits that kept building up to better habits. Start with the easiest thing, and go from there. If you manage to stop a binge one candy bar short, that's progress. Next time you may be able to stop 2 candy bars short.

    You may also want to find out why you developed the binge habit and what usually triggers them and work on that. If professional help is needed, then don't hesitate to seek it.
  • sarabushby
    sarabushby Posts: 621 Member
    Per the recommendations on your other post, just don’t cut your calories so extremely. Going from 2400 to 1200 OMAD is highly unlikely to be sustainable.
    People suggested you just eat 500/day under your previous consumption, so why not try for 1900 per day spread throughout the day sourced from lean proteins, lots of vegetables to fill you up and so that you don’t feel lightheaded.

    You’ve been given lots of great advice already, you should heed it and be patient.
  • Liftng4Lis
    Liftng4Lis Posts: 15,151 Member
    Sounds like a food scale is needed, so you can ascertain if you're getting enough calories in that one meal.
  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    Liftng4Lis wrote: »
    Sounds like a food scale is needed, so you can ascertain if you're getting enough calories in that one meal.

    I don't have a food scale yes. But I used to play for my school soccer team and I kind of know the portion size and calorie content of the things I am eating. I also cook myself, so I know how much of what I am using to cook. But then gain, I have been meaning to buy a food scale.
  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    sarabushby wrote: »
    Per the recommendations on your other post, just don’t cut your calories so extremely. Going from 2400 to 1200 OMAD is highly unlikely to be sustainable.
    People suggested you just eat 500/day under your previous consumption, so why not try for 1900 per day spread throughout the day sourced from lean proteins, lots of vegetables to fill you up and so that you don’t feel lightheaded.

    You’ve been given lots of great advice already, you should heed it and be patient.

    2400 is what I used to eat, or more even. But my TDEE is about 1500 calories. I don't know what happens. I can eat about 2400 and stay the same weight. I guess I can try 1900 and go from there to see what happens.
  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    You don't need to do OMAD if it's making things harder for you.
    You don't need to do OMAD if you're having trouble eating enough calories.

    If you don't want to quit, don't do things that are harder than they need to be. The easier you make it on yourself the more likely you are to continue doing it. All you need to lose weight is to eat fewer calories than your body burns throughout the day, everything else is personal preference and personal tweaking to make things easier.

    Here are some of the things I tried and how I tweaked them to my preference:
    - I tried OMAD, didn't like it because I'm happier eating more often and I hate eating all of my needed protein in one meal. No need to be stubborn, I quit doing it. I did pick up the strategy of eating all of my calories in one meal occasionally when I know I will be eating something that is too high in calories to fit into my typical diet in satisfying amounts.

    - I tried IF, but I didn't like the clock watching and increased hunger, so I stopped doing it. I did pick up the strategy of delaying my breakfast until I'm first hungry in the morning. No clock watching needed.

    - I tried low carb and didn't like the hunger, the food, and the inability to eat what I wanted, so I stopped doing it. It did help me be more okay with including more fat in my diet whenever I want.

    - I tried sticking to macros, but it made me too obsessive. Now I just eat whatever I want, but I keep an eye on protein and introduce extra bits of it here and there whenever I can without obsessing or trying to hit an extra high target.

    My eating habit is very unhealthy. And I probably eat a lot more than my TDEE in normal life. I binge ate every other day the last few months and gained 15kg. I want to lose at least 8 to 10kg and when i eat 500 calories less than my TDEE to lose weight, I dont normally stick to it and end up binge eating again. This is like a cycle. I think I can never lose the weight if I don't do something extreme.

    That's problematic thinking. You may do something extreme and lose weight but ignore the source of the problem and fail to develop long lasting strategies, which means regaining what you lost. I know everything about eating more that TDEE. I used to be super morbidly obese, by that, I mean more than 50 kg overweight. The only thing that worked is the very slow introduction of small habits that kept building up to better habits. Start with the easiest thing, and go from there. If you manage to stop a binge one candy bar short, that's progress. Next time you may be able to stop 2 candy bars short.

    You may also want to find out why you developed the binge habit and what usually triggers them and work on that. If professional help is needed, then don't hesitate to seek it.

    ok so, I was overweight when I was very young. Then my mum portion controlled my food and I lost all the weight before I was a teen. I have never been overweight since. But then I stopped playing for school team and gradually local team and I wanted to build muscle and joined a gym. I was making very good progress and I had to eat about 3000 calories or more to maintain because I was an avid jump roper and worked really hard in gym. This excessive food eating made my habit worse. I got married and first of year marriage was a lot of parties, drinking a lot of alcohol, and could not manage to go to the gym or exercise. But my eating plenty habit was there. I tried to eat less but it backfired and I started binge eating like crazy. I ate 4-5k calories every single day for 10 months and I weighed myself to find out I have gained 10 kilograms and later in the next 5 months, I have gained another 3 kilograms or so. I was 52 kilos on January 2018, I looked really fit and I could do half dips and push ups and did 1000 jump rope for warm up. I honestly don't know how to lose weight because I never have. I found a TDEE calculator that says my TDEE is 1515 or sth but 1515 is very little food for me even if I gorge on leafy vegetables, I become hungry in like the next hour. I also am a volume eater, so I don't know what can be done at this point.
  • Cahgetsfit
    Cahgetsfit Posts: 1,913 Member
    You don't need to do OMAD if it's making things harder for you.
    You don't need to do OMAD if you're having trouble eating enough calories.

    If you don't want to quit, don't do things that are harder than they need to be. The easier you make it on yourself the more likely you are to continue doing it. All you need to lose weight is to eat fewer calories than your body burns throughout the day, everything else is personal preference and personal tweaking to make things easier.

    Here are some of the things I tried and how I tweaked them to my preference:
    - I tried OMAD, didn't like it because I'm happier eating more often and I hate eating all of my needed protein in one meal. No need to be stubborn, I quit doing it. I did pick up the strategy of eating all of my calories in one meal occasionally when I know I will be eating something that is too high in calories to fit into my typical diet in satisfying amounts.

    - I tried IF, but I didn't like the clock watching and increased hunger, so I stopped doing it. I did pick up the strategy of delaying my breakfast until I'm first hungry in the morning. No clock watching needed.

    - I tried low carb and didn't like the hunger, the food, and the inability to eat what I wanted, so I stopped doing it. It did help me be more okay with including more fat in my diet whenever I want.

    - I tried sticking to macros, but it made me too obsessive. Now I just eat whatever I want, but I keep an eye on protein and introduce extra bits of it here and there whenever I can without obsessing or trying to hit an extra high target.

    My eating habit is very unhealthy. And I probably eat a lot more than my TDEE in normal life. I binge ate every other day the last few months and gained 15kg. I want to lose at least 8 to 10kg and when i eat 500 calories less than my TDEE to lose weight, I dont normally stick to it and end up binge eating again. This is like a cycle. I think I can never lose the weight if I don't do something extreme.

    That's problematic thinking. You may do something extreme and lose weight but ignore the source of the problem and fail to develop long lasting strategies, which means regaining what you lost. I know everything about eating more that TDEE. I used to be super morbidly obese, by that, I mean more than 50 kg overweight. The only thing that worked is the very slow introduction of small habits that kept building up to better habits. Start with the easiest thing, and go from there. If you manage to stop a binge one candy bar short, that's progress. Next time you may be able to stop 2 candy bars short.

    You may also want to find out why you developed the binge habit and what usually triggers them and work on that. If professional help is needed, then don't hesitate to seek it.

    ok so, I was overweight when I was very young. Then my mum portion controlled my food and I lost all the weight before I was a teen. I have never been overweight since. But then I stopped playing for school team and gradually local team and I wanted to build muscle and joined a gym. I was making very good progress and I had to eat about 3000 calories or more to maintain because I was an avid jump roper and worked really hard in gym. This excessive food eating made my habit worse. I got married and first of year marriage was a lot of parties, drinking a lot of alcohol, and could not manage to go to the gym or exercise. But my eating plenty habit was there. I tried to eat less but it backfired and I started binge eating like crazy. I ate 4-5k calories every single day for 10 months and I weighed myself to find out I have gained 10 kilograms and later in the next 5 months, I have gained another 3 kilograms or so. I was 52 kilos on January 2018, I looked really fit and I could do half dips and push ups and did 1000 jump rope for warm up. I honestly don't know how to lose weight because I never have. I found a TDEE calculator that says my TDEE is 1515 or sth but 1515 is very little food for me even if I gorge on leafy vegetables, I become hungry in like the next hour. I also am a volume eater, so I don't know what can be done at this point.

    I am a volume eater. I can eat 1500 cals a day (granted - i WILL be peckish by the evening) quite easily eating a decent amount of food. YOu can have a look at my diary if you like - go backwards a bit becuase at the moment i'm on maintenance calories ~1900, go back a couple of weeks to see 1500. I eat 4-5 times a day. and all my meals are quite volumous.

    You can do this, but you need to a) buy a scale. I am good at eyeballing too, but we tend to overestimate when eyeballing. I'll go "yep - that's 100g" then i'll add another tiny bit because yum. So it's no longer 100g of whatever it was I eyeballed. and a little bit here and a little bit there next thing you know you're over by heaps.

    I can also put away over 3000 calories a day with EASE. I don't understand people who are "full" after 1200 - 1200 is a bare minimum i'd eat if I was so sick I was bedridden. What I"m trying to say is that to be successful, don't do these weird fad things like try to shove 1200 calories down your face in one sitting (easily done, but then hungry later.... for me anyway) and then starve the rest of the day.

    As mentioned above - set a moderate deficit, track your calories using a scale - or even those tupperware portion control things - a friend of mine on here uses those and she's been very successful with her weight loss - they're like these little coloured containers that you fill with whatever it tells you - protein, carbs, salad, I don't know, not sure exacty becuase never used it, but seems to work for her and is an alternative to the scale.

    It's not easy - becuase if weight loss was easy no-one would be fat right? but it IS doable and it doesn't have to be dreadful if you are eating proper meals when you are hungry throughout the day and without being starving and wanting to eat everything in sight.

    Me- the more I limit my intake, the more prone I am to massive bingeing sessions. Where 4K calories are easily consumed.

    Good luck and don't give up - I mean - give up this OMAD business, but don't give up on your journey - just approach it in a more sensible less traumatic way.