SO SLOW

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  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,811 Member
    edited April 2019
    New plan! Feedback more than welcome.

    Sunday - Long run. Up to 6 miles! Takes me for FREAKING ever, but I did it yesterday. Woot!
    Monday - Intervals/walking. I'm thinking maybe 30 minutes of interval training and then walking for another... 2 miles?
    Tuesday - Cross-train (50 min BodyPump class)
    Wednesday - Medium run, 3-4 miles.
    Thursday - Cross-train (50 min BodyPump class)
    Friday - Intervals / walking. Would a short-ish run be better? Maybe 2 miles?
    Saturday - Cross-train (50 min BodyPump, 50 min Zumba)

    I'd have a rest day in there if it was me.

    *shakes head in violent agreement.

    OP, looking at this weekly plan, I'm struck by the number of days that may be "high intensity" efforts. Is "Bodypump" a high intensity workout?

    If I am correct in assuming that the Bodypump class contains some high energy cardio work, then I see 3 days with high intensity work during Bodypump, coupled with 2 days that contain sprints as part of your intervals, so a total of 5 high intensity activities per week. I also fail to find a rest day in your schedule.

    If my understanding is incorrect, please advise. If I am accurate, then a couple thoughts come to mind:

    First, a question: Is your primary goal to improve your running speed/distance, or simply to add running into your ongoing fitness regimen? If you are trying to improve your running, do you have a run specific goal, such as running a 5k or half marathon, perhaps a specific time goal, etc?

    A couple suggestions: Almost all endurance athletes(such as runners) do most (80%) of their runs at a conversational pace, meaning you run slow enough to be able to say your name and address without being out of breath. This is especially true for newer runners. I would suggest finding a plan or incorporate more easy runs into your weekly plan. Intervals that are at a recovery pace might be a way to go. For example: 4 min run @ easy pace/ 1 min walking pace.

    Secondly, runners who follow a training plan often have "recovery weeks" built into the plans. This allows the body to shed some of the cumulative fatigue that builds up during a training period.

    Finally, while many people can perform well by training 7 days per week, I believe that an understanding of your fatigue (or a coach to watch it for you) is critical. For example, when following a 7 day training regimen, I have an easy day on Mondays, usually just a 30 minute spin on the bike. The goal of this bike session is to simply spin out the fatigue in my legs from the Saturday/Sunday long sessions that preceded the Monday work. If I am very fatigued, then I can skip this bike session completely.

    So, my gut feeling is that you may be carrying quite a bit of fatigue, and that may be hampering your ability to increase your performance.

    Good luck in your training.
  • MostlyWater
    MostlyWater Posts: 4,294 Member
    Do Sprints/Intervals.
  • clicketykeys
    clicketykeys Posts: 5,566 Member
    I'd have a rest day in there if it was me.

    That's sort of what I'm trying to feel out. What constitutes 'rest'? Today I walked to the park, did a half-hour of 4m/1m intervals like @luckycleo777 and @Djproulx suggested, and then walked home. (The park is a little more than a half-mile from my house.) So, like, way less than what I did yesterday. And it wasn't too bad, other than the fact that I just don't like exercise all that much.
    Djproulx wrote: »
    *shakes head in violent agreement.

    OP, looking at this weekly plan, I'm struck by the number of days that may be "high intensity" efforts. Is "Bodypump" a high intensity workout?

    It is much higher intensity than surfing the internet or coloring or taking a nap. ;) I don't have a heart rate monitor, but it does tire me, and I get out of breath. But I also don't want to pass out or barf or drop the weight, so I choose my weight carefully, take breathers as needed, and reduce weight if I can't keep form.
    If I am correct in assuming that the Bodypump class contains some high energy cardio work, then I see 3 days with high intensity work during Bodypump, coupled with 2 days that contain sprints as part of your intervals, so a total of 5 high intensity activities per week. I also fail to find a rest day in your schedule.

    Still working on the "intervals." I think what I might do is alternate between weeks - one week sprints, one week 4/1s. That'll be either Fridays or Mondays. Probably Mondays. And then Friday would be my rest day, which would still involve some activity - probably going for a walk.
    If you are trying to improve your running, do you have a run specific goal, such as running a 5k or half marathon, perhaps a specific time goal, etc?

    I do want to run a half marathon, but the one I'm interested is a good bit in the distance. Mostly I'd like to be faster so that I don't feel like if I want to get some distance in I'm devoting half a day to it in between getting to a safe run area (there are no sidewalks in any of the neighborhoods near me) actually running, stretching, getting home, and degrossifying.
    A couple suggestions: Almost all endurance athletes(such as runners) do most (80%) of their runs at a conversational pace, meaning you run slow enough to be able to say your name and address without being out of breath. This is especially true for newer runners. I would suggest finding a plan or incorporate more easy runs into your weekly plan. Intervals that are at a recovery pace might be a way to go. For example: 4 min run @ easy pace/ 1 min walking pace.

    This is what I did today! Or I tried. I did get somewhat out of breath. But if I go any slower, I'll be walking, and I can do that forever without feeling like I'm accomplishing anything.
    Secondly, runners who follow a training plan often have "recovery weeks" built into the plans. This allows the body to shed some of the cumulative fatigue that builds up during a training period.

    I'll have to look into that! thanks :)
    ...The goal of this bike session is to simply spin out the fatigue in my legs from the Saturday/Sunday long sessions that preceded the Monday work. If I am very fatigued, then I can skip this bike session completely.

    I'm a little confused. Spin is cardio, isn't it? Or are you mostly just moving your legs a little bit with minimal resistance?

    I really appreciate people's suggestions! Sorry if I don't always understand.
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    No sprints. You risk injury and the reward is very small since you don't have the base you need. Save them for when you learn to run. For now, distance is king. Long, slow miles will help your body adjust to running.

    Rest is VERY important. I run 35-50 miles a week (soon to be more) and I take at least one day off a week (more if my body tells me it needs it).

    Finally, don't just 'wing it'. Get a plan for a distance or race and follow it. Maybe a beginners 5k and then 10k plan would work. Check out Hal Higdon for some good starter plans.

    Good luck.
  • Djproulx
    Djproulx Posts: 2,811 Member
    OP, sorry if I was not very clear: Rest days mean rest as in NO running. I like your comment about taking Fridays off and only going for a walk. Perfect!

    Regarding my bike example: Yes, it is simply an EASY spin with very little resistance. I'm not saying you should do this, simply providing an example of my 7 day plan including a very low intensity day with the option to scratch entirely if fatigued. You don't need a 7 day training plan. (This was probably a bad example when taken out of context. I used the 7 day/week plan while building for a long course triathlon race, so swimming, cycling and running were required each week.)

    Note what @dewd2 said: Take at least one day off per week, or MORE if needed, no need for sprints yet, and find a training plan. There are many good ones online. Do this, and your running fitness will increase!
  • dolliesdaughter
    dolliesdaughter Posts: 545 Member
    My pace went up, when I started running with faster people.
  • TavistockToad
    TavistockToad Posts: 35,731 Member
    To me a rest day is not doing any running or cross training. So no intervals.

    Walk, do some yoga, that really is enough!