Fitness tracker recommendations?

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Replies

  • CoreyLust
    CoreyLust Posts: 42 Member
    edited May 2019
    Maxematics wrote: »
    CoreyLust wrote: »
    Maxematics wrote: »
    CoreyLust wrote: »
    I've been using these things since they first came out. I can recommend the Garmin Fenix 5 for accuracy - assuming you set it up correctly. Fitbits are a monumental waste of type. They horribly over calculate your calorie burn.

    This isn't true at all. Many users here have Fitbits and they have been accurate enough for them, myself included. There have also been reports of fitness trackers, specifically Fitbit, over/underestimating by ~ 200 calories which isn't too bad considering all of the variables.

    No fitness tracker will be 100% accurate because that's highly improbable but those who claim that a fitness tracker is horribly off usually did not use the device properly and blame the device when it comes down to user error. Examples include:
    • people who take the TDEE given by Fitbit and eat that on top of their MFP/other site's calculated calories.
    • people who take exercise calories from Fitbit, manually add them to MFP/other site's calculated calories, and eat all of them back when calories burned during exercise on Fitbit are gross, not net (they include your BMR).
    • people who don't weigh their food so they are actually eating much more than they think.

    For people who can interpret data properly, understand how to use the technology, and are honest about their calorie intake, fitness trackers can be a useful tool. They are not perfect nor are they mandatory but they can really help someone understand how physical activity, even walking, can affect their TDEE.

    Most places in the diet world shout from the rooftops how women must eat 1200 calories to lose weight. I used to buy into that mentality before I started using my Fitbit and joined MFP. I'm 5'3", 109 pounds, and I maintain on 2000 to 2300 calories per day on average. I would have been starving myself and it would have taken a much longer period of adjustment in realizing how much I need to eat without the help of my fitness tracker.

    Fit bit was sued for 35 million and lost in a class action suit over their inaccuracy. Nuff said. Oh and I know exactly how this stuff works. But thanks for implying that myself and anyone else who accurately comment on a particular tracker being in accurate have no idea what we're doing when setting one up.

    If you know exactly how this stuff works, why are you bringing up a lawsuit that has little to nothing to do with the OP's post?

    The huge lawsuit against Fitbit was about how its PurePulse sensors on the Charge HR and Surge are not always consistent/accurate during intense physical activity; the lawsuit had nothing to do with inaccuracies over TDEE, steps, sleep, etc. A smaller class action suit over the accuracy of the sleep tracker was filed in 2015 by two people, reopened in 2019, and is limited to the Flex, One, and Ultra; three Fitbit models that are no longer on the market.

    To elaborate, the PurePulse tracker used by Fitbit HR models would catch up to some users actual HR over time but was found by some to not provide their exact HR in real time either being higher than their actual HR or lower. This was claimed to be potentially dangerous to those whose HR reached a higher peak than intended. One person in the lawsuit with a heart condition said his chest strap and Fitbit differed by 10 to 20bpm. Most people are aware that a chest strap has a higher percent chance of being accurate over a wrist strap when it comes to heart rate. Those with medical conditions should know that a fitness tracker is not a replacement for a medical grade HR tracking device. Fitbit is not the only fitness tracker that had some inaccuracies over the heart rate; other wrist-based HR sensors had the same inaccuracies sometimes. Keyword being sometimes.

    However, again, this really doesn't concern the OP unless they specifically need a tracker to monitor their HR and if they did, I would think they'd be consulting with their doctor first. For day to day activities, exercise, calorie and sleep tracking, I have found my Fitbit to be accurate and so have many others. Maybe it's just me but I wouldn't expect a fitness tracker to be 100% accurate to the point where I'd file a lawsuit over it. There are many variables at play in the human body for any tracker to be 100% accurate but most people have found that it's close enough, gives them decent insight of their TDEE and activity levels, and have easily adjusted to any minor discrepancies. I still maintain my stance that those who claim the TDEE calculations of Fitbit are grossly, horribly off boils down to user error rather than device error.



    I don't think you have read the ops post properly. You are also providing information that is quite far from the ops question. If you aren't getting accurate calorie burn information from your fitness tracker then what is the point in having it. You keep bringing up tdee. If your using your fitness tracker to give you insight into your calorie burn and its inaccurate. Thats hopeless. Some of the fitbits I tested were calculating tea to be twice as much as it actually was. My garmin is spot on and they've been in the game alot longer than fit bit. Fitbits have only been around for the last 5 years or so. They are cheap and nasty inaccurate fitness trackers.
  • CoreyLust
    CoreyLust Posts: 42 Member
    Thank you everyone....I’m going to check out Garmin too. I honestly didn’t even know they made trackers.

    Yeah they were making them before fit bit even existed. Fit bit is one of the new kids on the block. Garmin is one of the original companies that started making these devices. They have much more experience.
  • fishgutzy
    fishgutzy Posts: 2,807 Member
    Apple Watch has a glass dome. That makes it unusable for anything even a little bit rugged.
    My Garmin has scratches on the metal frame but not a single scratch in the sapphire glass. I would have destroyed an Apple Watch many times over.
  • wenrob
    wenrob Posts: 125 Member
    fishgutzy wrote: »
    Apple Watch has a glass dome. That makes it unusable for anything even a little bit rugged.
    My Garmin has scratches on the metal frame but not a single scratch in the sapphire glass. I would have destroyed an Apple Watch many times over.
    The Stainless Steel versions of the Apple Watch have Sapphire Glass.

  • fishgutzy
    fishgutzy Posts: 2,807 Member
    wenrob wrote: »
    fishgutzy wrote: »
    Apple Watch has a glass dome. That makes it unusable for anything even a little bit rugged.
    My Garmin has scratches on the metal frame but not a single scratch in the sapphire glass. I would have destroyed an Apple Watch many times over.
    The Stainless Steel versions of the Apple Watch have Sapphire Glass.

    But do they still have a dome? Even sapphire with crack hitting the ceramic tile along the edge of a pool.
    Lane sharing in China can be brutal.
  • lindamtuck2018
    lindamtuck2018 Posts: 6,481 Member
    I have the Fitbit Ionic. I love it. It has lots of great features. It automatically recognizes certain exercises. You can also can select different exercises when you begin, such as run, bike, swim, treadmill, weights, interval timer or workout. I love the friendly competitions with friends, which encourages me to move more.