What vitamins and supplements are most important to you?

2

Replies

  • WholeFoods4Lyfe
    WholeFoods4Lyfe Posts: 1,512 Member
    I take Vit D3/K2, Magnesium, and Iodine because I am deficient. That's it. I don't believe in supplementing just for the sake of supplementing. I believe that you should only supplement with vitamins and minerals that you are actually deficient in.
  • CharlieCharlie007
    CharlieCharlie007 Posts: 245 Member
    Vitamin D, Calcium, Omega 3,6,9, caffeine pills
  • CharlieCharlie007
    CharlieCharlie007 Posts: 245 Member
    and multivitamin
  • Mjkozki
    Mjkozki Posts: 45 Member
    For some reason, I got 3 "woos" for listing my daily regimen. Was this intentional, or is someone questioning what I do? If you're on Keto, this shouldn't be a surprise to you. If you're not on Keto, ask a question or two before making a snap judgment. Thank you.
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    I take Calcium Citrate, magnesium and D3; ACV with tumeric, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne and cream of tartar (potassium) in my matcha tea; serrapeptase and choline, and I sprinkle nutritional yeast on vegetables and in bone broth.

  • cdudley628
    cdudley628 Posts: 547 Member
    I have multivitamin gummies, and a calcium gummy that also has vitamin D. Vitamin D and calcium were highly suggested by my doctor and she told me that taking a multivitamin would be good as well.
  • TrishSeren
    TrishSeren Posts: 587 Member
    fhk281zbzezr.png

    None, unless my doctor says I need to.
  • grimendale
    grimendale Posts: 2,194 Member
    For me, iron, B12, omega 3, and D. I'm vegetarian, so the first three are precautionary (I usually get enough through diet, but doctor agrees it's worth taking the precaution). D is per doctor's orders based on low levels in my last physical.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,947 Member
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    For some reason, I got 3 "woos" for listing my daily regimen. Was this intentional, or is someone questioning what I do? If you're on Keto, this shouldn't be a surprise to you. If you're not on Keto, ask a question or two before making a snap judgment. Thank you.
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    I take Calcium Citrate, magnesium and D3; ACV with tumeric, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne and cream of tartar (potassium) in my matcha tea; serrapeptase and choline, and I sprinkle nutritional yeast on vegetables and in bone broth.

    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    The poster was sharing her regimen, not making any claims about it. Now, if she had said "I take nutritional yeast so I can live to be 200," that would be woo-worthy.
  • kzzr
    kzzr Posts: 53 Member
    edited June 2019
    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    Thank you so much for clarifying this! Thankfully I haven't woo-ed anyone, but I certainly thought woo was like "woohoo" or "well-done", Iooks like I'm getting too old to internet lol
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,947 Member
    kzzr wrote: »
    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    Thank you so much for clarifying this! Thankfully I haven't woo-ed anyone, but I certainly thought woo was like "woohoo" or "well-done", Iooks like I'm getting too old to internet lol

    Woohoo is a common misunderstanding :)

    In fact, when the Woo reaction was first rolled out, it had two (opposite) meanings, the current one that I posted above, and woohoo.
  • Strawblackcat
    Strawblackcat Posts: 944 Member
    edited June 2019
    AM:

    Probiotic (Florastor) - Helps SO MUCH with my IBS. I've had really bad stomach issues ever since I can remember (and, from talking to my parents, I was a really colicky baby, so I wouldn't be surprised if they were going on since before I can remember,) and this probiotic is the only one that really seems to make a different for me out of the dozens that I've tried over the years.

    Lovely Legs (Garden of Life) - It's a Diosmin supplement to help with varicose veins and spider veins. I'm young, but they run in my family, and working in retail doesn't do me any favors. I notice a definite difference in swelling and "leg heaviness" by the end of the day if I forget to take it.

    Methylated B Complex (Pure Encapsulations) - To help with energy, and because I don't eat much meat. It actually makes a huge difference for my mom, who also takes it. She's mostly "anti-supplement", but takes this religiously since it improves her mood so much. My Dad has asked me before if I slip something else in along with it, since it takes her from being a raging b**ch to a bearable individual.

    PM:

    Probiotic (Florastor)

    Vitamind D3, 5000IU (brand varies) - For bone & immune health.

    CBD Oil (Between 10-20mg, depending)(Barlean's is my favorite, but I switch brands around). - I have chronic issues with tendonitis in my ankles and feet, and this has really helped in preventing flares for me. For reference, I used to have 2-3 flares per year (each lasting about a month), and I haven't had a single one since starting CBD about a year and a half ago. I prefer liquid oils.

    Magnesium Citrate (about 1,000mg) (Natural Calm) - For the previously mentioned digestive issues. I get the tub at Sam's, and it lasts me a little over a month.

    Psyllium Husks (2tbsp) (NOW or Frontier brand, usually) - For the stomach issues.

    Protein Powder(Type and brand depends, depending on the day) - For post-workout recovery. I use collagen and whey when I'm having a bad stomach day and plant protein when I'm feeling better.

    Vitamin C (Megafood Complex C) - Because I got a 180-tablet bottle for free from one of their reps. I figure I have to use it up somehow. Otherwise, I probably wouldn't bother.
  • VegjoyP
    VegjoyP Posts: 2,276 Member
    edited June 2019
    earlnabby wrote: »

    You might want to rethink this. Steaming in the microwave actually retains more nutrients than any other cooking method.

    I didn't know this. Hmmm. Would the multivitamin be a bad thing?

    Could just be a general waste of money, as you might be taking something you don't need. You'll pass excess water-soluble vitamins in your urine. The body stores some other micronutrients, like vitamin A and iron, whether it needs them or not, and will continue storing them even at harmful levels, because they are not water-soluble.

    Because supplements, including vitamins, are not regulated in the U.S., it's a bit of a crap-shoot as to whether they actually contain the ingredients they claim. Your best bet is probably to go with products whose manufacturers have voluntarily submitted them for third-party testing, such as USP, which will be noted on the label.

    Then there are vitamin supplements that actually contain random harmful ingredients, such as lead and arsenic.

    I work for a reputable supplement coorporation. I will tell anyone this:
    -Food is first, Food is medicine
    - Research, Confirm and talk to a certified professional on the field
    - Know WHY you are taking a supplement, herb, or vitamin
    - There are a lot of avenues, the more food based, bioavailable and clean ingrediants are vital
    I have a plethora of things to comment, not just because I work in supplements- they are reasons I started a career in this field.
    - Yes, there are precautions and things to be aware of and intetactions, contraindications.
    - There are synergistic combinations and many supplements have multiple functions.

    With that, my main choices now are: CBD, Probiotic and ATP ( Patent product ) B 12, D3, collagen, Vit C, Food Multi, Omegas

    Others Are:
    Glutimine powder, L- Carnatine, L Citrulline( exercise, recovery and metabolism )

    As needed- Neurotropic Adaptagen herbs and extracts, GABA, Theanine, Lemon Balm, Skullcap. Ashwaganda

    There are multiple reasons for these choices and I cycle them, do not use same things all the time. I have cured many ailnents by lifestyle choices, psychologically and physically.

    Because I work in the field I have endless resources for information.




  • VegjoyP
    VegjoyP Posts: 2,276 Member
    VegjoyP wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »

    You might want to rethink this. Steaming in the microwave actually retains more nutrients than any other cooking method.

    I didn't know this. Hmmm. Would the multivitamin be a bad thing?

    Could just be a general waste of money, as you might be taking something you don't need. You'll pass excess water-soluble vitamins in your urine. The body stores some other micronutrients, like vitamin A and iron, whether it needs them or not, and will continue storing them even at harmful levels, because they are not water-soluble.

    Because supplements, including vitamins, are not regulated in the U.S., it's a bit of a crap-shoot as to whether they actually contain the ingredients they claim. Your best bet is probably to go with products whose manufacturers have voluntarily submitted them for third-party testing, such as USP, which will be noted on the label.

    Then there are vitamin supplements that actually contain random harmful ingredients, such as lead and arsenic.

    I work for a reputable supplement coorporation. I will tell anyone this:
    -Food is first, Food is medicine
    - Research, Confirm and talk to a certified professional on the field
    - Know WHY you are taking a supplement, herb, or vitamin
    - There are a lot of avenues, the more food based, bioavailable and clean ingrediants are vital
    I have a plethora of things to comment, not just because I work in supplements- they are reasons I started a career in this field.
    - Yes, there are precautions and things to be aware of and intetactions, contraindications.
    - There are synergistic combinations and many supplements have multiple functions.

    With that, my main choices now are: CBD, Probiotic and ATP ( Patent product ) B 12, D3, collagen, Vit C, Food Multi, Omegas

    Others Are:
    Glutimine powder, L- Carnatine, L Citrulline( exercise, recovery and metabolism )

    As needed- Neurotropic Adaptagen herbs and extracts, GABA, Theanine, Lemon Balm, Skullcap. Ashwaganda

    There are multiple reasons for these choices and I cycle them, do not use same things all the time. I have cured many ailnents by lifestyle choices, psychologically and physically.

    Because I work in the field I have endless resources for information.




    Also Curcumin!
  • Mjkozki
    Mjkozki Posts: 45 Member
    Thanks for clearing that up. What's frustrating is that I can't find who clicked on the "Woo" so I can either clarify or refute their response. I know it's not a big deal, but I get tired of people passing judgment on things they know little about. I thought the point of the thread was simply to see what our day-to-day was like.

    At the end of the day, unless they possess the medical license or certification, and have actually examined "ME", I'd just as soon they keep their pseudo-scientific assessments to themselves.

    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    For some reason, I got 3 "woos" for listing my daily regimen. Was this intentional, or is someone questioning what I do? If you're on Keto, this shouldn't be a surprise to you. If you're not on Keto, ask a question or two before making a snap judgment. Thank you.
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    I take Calcium Citrate, magnesium and D3; ACV with tumeric, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne and cream of tartar (potassium) in my matcha tea; serrapeptase and choline, and I sprinkle nutritional yeast on vegetables and in bone broth.

    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    The poster was sharing her regimen, not making any claims about it. Now, if she had said "I take nutritional yeast so I can live to be 200," that would be woo-worthy.

  • slbbw
    slbbw Posts: 330 Member
    Vit D, B12, Methyl Folate, Magnesium, and tyrosine. Low blood levels for D and folate. Long time vegetarian for B12. Magnesium to balance the D supplementation and tyrosine to help support dopamine production as I weaned from a prescription medication.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,894 Member
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    Thanks for clearing that up. What's frustrating is that I can't find who clicked on the "Woo" so I can either clarify or refute their response. I know it's not a big deal, but I get tired of people passing judgment on things they know little about. I thought the point of the thread was simply to see what our day-to-day was like.

    At the end of the day, unless they possess the medical license or certification, and have actually examined "ME", I'd just as soon they keep their pseudo-scientific assessments to themselves.

    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    For some reason, I got 3 "woos" for listing my daily regimen. Was this intentional, or is someone questioning what I do? If you're on Keto, this shouldn't be a surprise to you. If you're not on Keto, ask a question or two before making a snap judgment. Thank you.
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    I take Calcium Citrate, magnesium and D3; ACV with tumeric, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne and cream of tartar (potassium) in my matcha tea; serrapeptase and choline, and I sprinkle nutritional yeast on vegetables and in bone broth.

    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    The poster was sharing her regimen, not making any claims about it. Now, if she had said "I take nutritional yeast so I can live to be 200," that would be woo-worthy.

    You are overreacting. We all get woo'd for posts that aren't woo at all.
  • hesn92
    hesn92 Posts: 5,971 Member
    prenatal
  • annspal4
    annspal4 Posts: 8 Member
    G
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    Thanks for clearing that up. What's frustrating is that I can't find who clicked on the "Woo" so I can either clarify or refute their response. I know it's not a big deal, but I get tired of people passing judgment on things they know little about. I thought the point of the thread was simply to see what our day-to-day was like.

    At the end of the day, unless they possess the medical license or certification, and have actually examined "ME", I'd just as soon they keep their pseudo-scientific assessments to themselves.
    For what it’s worth, you can disregard “woo”s if I’ve been near your post. Assume it was me scrolling quickly and not even realizing I hit an active spot on the screen/post!
  • Mjkozki
    Mjkozki Posts: 45 Member
    Thanks for the heads up. I don't think it was intentional, especially now that I understand that "woo" is being misused by alot of us, including myself!

    Full disclosure: I've been a bit '_itchy' the last few days. This wouldn't have bothered me a week ago.
    Must be the (lack of) carbs releasing my inner demons!! ROFL
    annspal4 wrote: »
    G
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    Thanks for clearing that up. What's frustrating is that I can't find who clicked on the "Woo" so I can either clarify or refute their response. I know it's not a big deal, but I get tired of people passing judgment on things they know little about. I thought the point of the thread was simply to see what our day-to-day was like.

    At the end of the day, unless they possess the medical license or certification, and have actually examined "ME", I'd just as soon they keep their pseudo-scientific assessments to themselves.
    For what it’s worth, you can disregard “woo”s if I’ve been near your post. Assume it was me scrolling quickly and not even realizing I hit an active spot on the screen/post!

  • Mjkozki
    Mjkozki Posts: 45 Member
    whatever.
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    Thanks for clearing that up. What's frustrating is that I can't find who clicked on the "Woo" so I can either clarify or refute their response. I know it's not a big deal, but I get tired of people passing judgment on things they know little about. I thought the point of the thread was simply to see what our day-to-day was like.

    At the end of the day, unless they possess the medical license or certification, and have actually examined "ME", I'd just as soon they keep their pseudo-scientific assessments to themselves.

    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    For some reason, I got 3 "woos" for listing my daily regimen. Was this intentional, or is someone questioning what I do? If you're on Keto, this shouldn't be a surprise to you. If you're not on Keto, ask a question or two before making a snap judgment. Thank you.
    Mjkozki wrote: »
    I take Calcium Citrate, magnesium and D3; ACV with tumeric, ginger, cinnamon, cayenne and cream of tartar (potassium) in my matcha tea; serrapeptase and choline, and I sprinkle nutritional yeast on vegetables and in bone broth.

    People mis-use the Woo reaction all the time. It's very annoying.

    Hey wooers - this is what woo is supposed to be used for:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/comment/31038294/#Comment_31038294
    What does the woo reaction mean? Woo is a term for pseudoscientific explanations that share certain common characteristics, often being too good to be true (aside from being unscientific). Woo is understood specifically as dressing itself in the trappings of science (but not the substance) while involving unscientific concepts, such as anecdotal evidence and sciencey-sounding words.

    The poster was sharing her regimen, not making any claims about it. Now, if she had said "I take nutritional yeast so I can live to be 200," that would be woo-worthy.

    You are overreacting. We all get woo'd for posts that aren't woo at all.