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Always bloated?

ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
Almost every time I've eaten, I get bloated, like, very bloated. My stomach can "grow" (from I--I to I----I) from morning to evening. I know some foods do more than others, full meals do more than some bread and hot chocolate. Sugary things are usually pretty bad, like cookies, but other than that I've not noticed much of a pattern.

I've been to doctors before and they've never found anything wrong (I don't think they've ever taken it seriously), I have considered trying specific diets but cutting things like tomatoes haven't been easy so I usually give up within a few days. I could probably try to cut out wheat without any issues, but I don't know if wheat is the problem.
I don't eat dairy.

I've had this issue since I was a teen, maybe forever (?), and I'm not sure what's causing it, any ideas? I can live with it, sure, but it's annoying.
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Replies

  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 19,989Member Member Posts: 19,989Member Member
    Did your doctors do testing for conditions such as celiac disease? If not, and https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/celiac-disease-symptoms sounds like you, insist you get tested. No point giving up wheat if you don't have a medical reason to do so.

    You could also try an elimination diet, but you would need to commit to it for 5-6 weeks. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/elimination-diet
    edited October 7
  • LivingtheLeanDreamLivingtheLeanDream Posts: 12,406Member Member Posts: 12,406Member Member
    I take it you've had blood tests done? to check for intolerance's.

    White bread or donuts/high sugar desserts and soft cheese are the main causes when I get bloat. Its a matter of trial and error and eliminating the things that cause your bloat/discomfort.

    Do you drink enough water?
    edited October 7
  • ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    Thank you for your answers, I drink plenty of water :wink:

    The doctors tested for celiac disease 13 years ago, I suppose things might've changed since then? I could definitely get that checked again.

    I've tried the elimination diet before and failed. Some of the things one is supposed to exclude doesn't really work for me to exclude, such as legumes (vegan here), it's hard to get what I need when I cut those, but maybe I could try a simplified version?

    If I had known exactly what made me bloat I would probably have stopped eating it by now, cookies and such is more a special occasion thing, nothing I eat normally since I know too much will upset my stomach.
  • apullumapullum Posts: 4,353Member Member Posts: 4,353Member Member
    Do you eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, etc.? Those can cause a lot of gas. On the second page of this file are some other gas producing foods: https://www.med.umich.edu/fbd/docs/Gas reduction diet.pdf
  • ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    apullum wrote: »
    Do you eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, etc.? Those can cause a lot of gas. On the second page of this file are some other gas producing foods: https://www.med.umich.edu/fbd/docs/Gas reduction diet.pdf

    Not really those, but I'll check that link, thank you!
    Keep a diary - what you ate, how you felt afterwards and how quickly does bloating occur. Maybe even take and track measurements of your stomach.

    Eventually you may see a pattern with regard to which foods are the trigger. Consider ingredients, not just the whole item. I'm intolerant to yeast, but it took a while to register that that was a component of wine, mayo, vinaigrette dressing and a whole bunch of other things.

    I've considered keeping a diary, but since it's almost every time I eat... it sounds a bit tiresome.

    I suppose it wouldn't hurt to give it a try.
  • collectingbluescollectingblues Posts: 2,485Member Member Posts: 2,485Member Member
    apullum wrote: »
    Do you eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, etc.? Those can cause a lot of gas. On the second page of this file are some other gas producing foods: https://www.med.umich.edu/fbd/docs/Gas reduction diet.pdf

    Not really those, but I'll check that link, thank you!
    Keep a diary - what you ate, how you felt afterwards and how quickly does bloating occur. Maybe even take and track measurements of your stomach.

    Eventually you may see a pattern with regard to which foods are the trigger. Consider ingredients, not just the whole item. I'm intolerant to yeast, but it took a while to register that that was a component of wine, mayo, vinaigrette dressing and a whole bunch of other things.

    I've considered keeping a diary, but since it's almost every time I eat... it sounds a bit tiresome.

    I suppose it wouldn't hurt to give it a try.

    Try the Cara app. You log foods, movements, bloating, gassiness, etc, and as it collects data, it tells you your foods on your best days and worst days. It’s a serious game changer if you have food intolerances.
  • caprihanacaprihana Posts: 34Member Member Posts: 34Member Member
    I know a Dr. who see's this all the time. She suffered herself really badly and the tests still showed nothing. She recommends completely giving your guts a rest. Cut out dairy, alcohol and other things too, taking pre and probiotics (amongst other things) and then after a month see how things are. She does this with her patients and has seen some excellent results.
  • ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    apullum wrote: »
    Do you eat a lot of cruciferous vegetables: broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, etc.? Those can cause a lot of gas. On the second page of this file are some other gas producing foods: https://www.med.umich.edu/fbd/docs/Gas reduction diet.pdf

    Not really those, but I'll check that link, thank you!
    Keep a diary - what you ate, how you felt afterwards and how quickly does bloating occur. Maybe even take and track measurements of your stomach.

    Eventually you may see a pattern with regard to which foods are the trigger. Consider ingredients, not just the whole item. I'm intolerant to yeast, but it took a while to register that that was a component of wine, mayo, vinaigrette dressing and a whole bunch of other things.

    I've considered keeping a diary, but since it's almost every time I eat... it sounds a bit tiresome.

    I suppose it wouldn't hurt to give it a try.

    Try the Cara app. You log foods, movements, bloating, gassiness, etc, and as it collects data, it tells you your foods on your best days and worst days. It’s a serious game changer if you have food intolerances.

    Thanks for the app-tip, I'll check it out.
    caprihana wrote: »
    I know a Dr. who see's this all the time. She suffered herself really badly and the tests still showed nothing. She recommends completely giving your guts a rest. Cut out dairy, alcohol and other things too, taking pre and probiotics (amongst other things) and then after a month see how things are. She does this with her patients and has seen some excellent results.

    I don't eat dairy and I don't drink alcohol, what other things do you mean? gluten? everything an elimination diet wants you to cut out? I can't really cut out legumes without having a really hard time getting what I need.
  • wendyheath32wendyheath32 Posts: 59Member Member Posts: 59Member Member
    Also another tip here ( fellow vegan here) soak and rinse your legumes also rinse the canned ones before you eat them. It's supposed to go with gas/ bloating
  • goldthistimegoldthistime Posts: 3,247Member Member Posts: 3,247Member Member
    I avoid beans completely because of how gassy they make me. If they are a mainstay for you I would suspect them. Have you tried Beano?
  • ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    I do rinse them. I've never really noticed any correlation with legumes and being bloated, though, most of my more severe bloatings happen when I haven't eaten them at all.

    I don't know what beano is, I googled it but I don't think we got that here.

    Also, I was bloated way before I switched to a vegan diet, and back then i didn't eat legumes at all. I do notice a slight improvement if I don't use processed foods at all, meaning I cook from scratch, but I'm not sure why that is. Could it be the fat?
  • slbbwslbbw Posts: 275Member Member Posts: 275Member Member
    It may be worth looking into FODMAP sensitivity. I just attempted and failed miserably at an elimination diet myself, but I had been tracking symptoms over the years and had a sense of what things might be triggers. Apples, onions and garlic for me. Cruciferous vegetables as well, but if I keep them to a minimum I am fine. These sensitivities tend to be cummulative so the idea of minimizing instead of eliminating is valid, its just harder to pinpoint the keytriggers that way. I would look up the classes of Fodmap and maybe start using your MFP log to note at which meals the bloating is the worst. If you can get some general trends you may be able to cut back on certain foods without having to do a full sale elimination.
  • slbbwslbbw Posts: 275Member Member Posts: 275Member Member
    since you are vegan, do you eat Seitan? Does this cause bloating or not? Seitan is straight gluten and can be a good indicator. You could still be sensitive to wheat, but determining if it is gluten or not might help you keep some key items in your diet.
  • caprihanacaprihana Posts: 34Member Member Posts: 34Member Member
    @ ColdDawing "I don't eat dairy and I don't drink alcohol, what other things do you mean? gluten? everything an elimination diet wants you to cut out? I can't really cut out legumes without having a really hard time getting what I need"

    I'll contact her and see if I can get some details for you.
  • whitpaulywhitpauly Posts: 1,118Member Member Posts: 1,118Member Member
    Probiotics/prebiotics can help,I'm a bloater too no matter what I eat,the only problem with probiotics is finding the right strains thaat you need and they get pricey!
  • nooshi713nooshi713 Posts: 3,663Member Member Posts: 3,663Member Member
    There are many good suggestions here already. It can be very tricky to narrow down food intolerances.

    I would recommend a gas tablet like Beano or Gas-X like someone else mentioned if you have already been to the doctor and they have ruled out serious causes. GERD can sometimes cause bloating as can IBS.

  • carlaringuettecarlaringuette Posts: 119Member Member Posts: 119Member Member
    I have that issue from food allergies. The docs love me because I am always the unusual case. Best I've ever felt is when I did the rotation diet and allergy shots.

    It's worth looking into.

    It's a pain and not exactly convenient. When I start to feel bad enough I flip back to it

    Wanna be vegan here.

    Having a General Tso's tofu bowl as we "speak"
  • ColdDawningColdDawning Posts: 25Member Member Posts: 25Member Member
    Thank you all for your replies, I'll check out the different things you're suggesting.

    I've had seitan as a small addition to stews and such and not really as a big piece at once, so I can't really say that I've noticed anything. I could try to just eat a big piece straight up and check if it does something for sure.
  • veganbaumveganbaum Posts: 1,990Member Member Posts: 1,990Member Member
    Just be aware that Beano may not be vegan. I think it's formulation changes and sometimes it is and sometimes it isn't. I don't know about Gas-X. There's a similar product that I think is called Bean-zyme and comes in a vegan version, but I've never tried it.
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