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Processed food rant

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  • aokoyeaokoye Member Posts: 3,494 Member Member Posts: 3,494 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    armyvet25 wrote: »
    Ok, my intermittent/fasting sometimes interferes with my eating with my wife, she won't be home till just after my trough period, if I end my fast now which completes my 16hrs, no problem, I let it go longer and adjust my daily intake times, but, thought I'd have a teeny tiny teensy itsy bitsy snack to stave off any cravings, wife brought home a turkey snack she thought I might want and I wasn't familiar with the nutrient label so thought I'd take a look before plopping in my gullet, HOLY NAKED BATMAN ON A STICK...70 calories and 440mg sodium on this tiny little TURKEY TURD! In the garbage bin with it.
    I hardly touch anything processed for this reason. To be honest, my one weakness is frozen pizza's, going to start making and freezing my own low cal/carb pizza's.

    Whole Foods had all of their frozen pizzas 50% off last week but the reviews for the mini pizzas I looked at were terrible. For a snack, I like English muffin pizzas - English muffins, spaghetti sauce, cheese, and pepperoni.

    That wouldn't meet your need for low carb, and as you mentioned subsequently, low sodium. How do you make your pizzas?

    While we are on the subject of pizza, for traditional crust, I use the recipe from my Cuisinart food processor. Rolling out the dough has become ever so much easier since I got one of these:

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HK2DNA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    41zigKi7MsL._AC_.jpg

    And I cook that in a 14" cast iron pizza skillet:

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B016ILHNS6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    81xq6pJ9MgL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

    I'll take a pizza! You cooking?

    I'm always cooking ;)

    Tomorrow night will be my solution for getting stuffing to taste like it was cooked in a turkey, without a turkey - put bone-in, skin-on thighs on top of the stuffing and bake, infusing the stuffing with chicken fat. Plus mashed potatoes, gravy, cranberry sauce, and something green TBD.

    I'm going to store this in my memory.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 4,059 Member Member, Premium Posts: 4,059 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    armyvet25 wrote: »
    Ok, my intermittent/fasting sometimes interferes with my eating with my wife, she won't be home till just after my trough period, if I end my fast now which completes my 16hrs, no problem, I let it go longer and adjust my daily intake times, but, thought I'd have a teeny tiny teensy itsy bitsy snack to stave off any cravings, wife brought home a turkey snack she thought I might want and I wasn't familiar with the nutrient label so thought I'd take a look before plopping in my gullet, HOLY NAKED BATMAN ON A STICK...70 calories and 440mg sodium on this tiny little TURKEY TURD! In the garbage bin with it.
    I hardly touch anything processed for this reason. To be honest, my one weakness is frozen pizza's, going to start making and freezing my own low cal/carb pizza's.

    Whole Foods had all of their frozen pizzas 50% off last week but the reviews for the mini pizzas I looked at were terrible. For a snack, I like English muffin pizzas - English muffins, spaghetti sauce, cheese, and pepperoni.

    That wouldn't meet your need for low carb, and as you mentioned subsequently, low sodium. How do you make your pizzas?

    While we are on the subject of pizza, for traditional crust, I use the recipe from my Cuisinart food processor. Rolling out the dough has become ever so much easier since I got one of these:

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000HK2DNA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    41zigKi7MsL._AC_.jpg

    And I cook that in a 14" cast iron pizza skillet:

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B016ILHNS6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    81xq6pJ9MgL._AC_SL1500_.jpg

    I'll take a pizza! You cooking?

    I'm always cooking ;)

    Tomorrow night will be my solution for getting stuffing to taste like it was cooked in a turkey, without a turkey - put bone-in, skin-on thighs on top of the stuffing and bake, infusing the stuffing with chicken fat. Plus mashed potatoes, gravy, cranberry sauce, and something green TBD.

    what time should I show up? ;)
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,950 Member Member Posts: 1,950 Member
    armyvet25 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »

    It's 6g of protein or 24 out of 70 calories. Lots of better choices if you want low calorie protein sources.

    Yay, someone who agrees, and my thoughts exactly...and I still think it looks like a turd!
    I have to say I'm biased as well, I make my own home-made jerky, so I've become a jerky snob and won't buy packaged stuff.

    [/quote]

    Have a son that lives in Wisconsin, you get some fantastic jerky from some of the small shops.
  • AliNouveauAliNouveau Member Posts: 36,287 Member Member Posts: 36,287 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Hollis100 wrote: »
    Having worked in a food research laboratory at Procter & Gamble's Food Research Center Winton Hill Technical Center I can say with pretty much confidence that food processing is not done to make the food more dangerous, less stable or more expensive. If they do it, it is to make the food safer, more long lasting, tastier or to comply with the bureaucrats. And, having cultured household kitchen surfaces to see what kind of mold and bacteria finds its way into containers after they have been opened in your kitchen, I would also predict that there is not a residential kitchen you would be comfortable having as a food processing plant. Fine for fixing dinner. Making jerky from raw beef, deer or fish without preservatives? Not so much.

    I get you. I understand. I've recently taken college science classes.

    However, I find it -- I don't know the word, maybe Twilight Zone-ish -- to fish a year old McDonald's French fry off a car floor and discover it's in perfect condition. Never molded, nothing.

    What troubles me is coming down in the morning to clean up from a party and finding a bowl of un-melted ice cream on the table. Room temperature. Yikes!



    In fact, it's normal for me (when I was eating ice cream regularly) to put it out for a bit to soften it for scooping (but not too much to cause ice crystals). So I call bogus on this.

    . . .

    I'd suggest you do a little research before calling another post "bogus."






    I'd suggest you do a little research before you call Bryer's "ice cream."

    ETA: watching clickbaity youtube videos isn't research.

    Here's a blog from someone that tested to see if the stories about Bryers not melting were true (not that blogs are any better than videos).
    Spoiler: Myth busted.

    https://spoonuniversity.com/lifestyle/i-tested-to-see-if-it-is-true-that-breyers-ice-cream-doesn-t-melt

    My brother had a carton of Breyers sit in his sink because it had been forgotten there and it didn't melt.
    Myth....confirmed in his house
    I've had some wicked reactions to Breyers so i believe there is something in there that's not good for you
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 1,950 Member Member Posts: 1,950 Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Hollis100 wrote: »
    Having worked in a food research laboratory at Procter & Gamble's Food Research Center Winton Hill Technical Center I can say with pretty much confidence that food processing is not done to make the food more dangerous, less stable or more expensive. If they do it, it is to make the food safer, more long lasting, tastier or to comply with the bureaucrats. And, having cultured household kitchen surfaces to see what kind of mold and bacteria finds its way into containers after they have been opened in your kitchen, I would also predict that there is not a residential kitchen you would be comfortable having as a food processing plant. Fine for fixing dinner. Making jerky from raw beef, deer or fish without preservatives? Not so much.

    I get you. I understand. I've recently taken college science classes.

    However, I find it -- I don't know the word, maybe Twilight Zone-ish -- to fish a year old McDonald's French fry off a car floor and discover it's in perfect condition. Never molded, nothing.

    Wow, I thought my car was dirty, and all I have are old soda bottles and work documents, none from a year ago.

    I am skeptical that the fry would be in perfect condition, but if you have consumed it, I guess I bow to your expertise.

    I'm guessing you've never cleaned out a vehicle where little kids who eat in the car are riders. You can find fries that look perfect to the naked eye that you know have been in there a while. Now part of an apple, banana another story.
  • psychod787psychod787 Member, Premium Posts: 4,059 Member Member, Premium Posts: 4,059 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    armyvet25 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »

    It's 6g of protein or 24 out of 70 calories. Lots of better choices if you want low calorie protein sources.

    Yay, someone who agrees, and my thoughts exactly...and I still think it looks like a turd!
    I have to say I'm biased as well, I make my own home-made jerky, so I've become a jerky snob and won't buy packaged stuff.

    Have a son that lives in Wisconsin, you get some fantastic jerky from some of the small shops.[/quote]

    I personally would not eat it as well. Though as you stated, I am biased. I grew up hunting and raising livestock, so I know how to make my own.
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,421 Member Member Posts: 7,421 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Hollis100 wrote: »
    Having worked in a food research laboratory at Procter & Gamble's Food Research Center Winton Hill Technical Center I can say with pretty much confidence that food processing is not done to make the food more dangerous, less stable or more expensive. If they do it, it is to make the food safer, more long lasting, tastier or to comply with the bureaucrats. And, having cultured household kitchen surfaces to see what kind of mold and bacteria finds its way into containers after they have been opened in your kitchen, I would also predict that there is not a residential kitchen you would be comfortable having as a food processing plant. Fine for fixing dinner. Making jerky from raw beef, deer or fish without preservatives? Not so much.

    I get you. I understand. I've recently taken college science classes.

    However, I find it -- I don't know the word, maybe Twilight Zone-ish -- to fish a year old McDonald's French fry off a car floor and discover it's in perfect condition. Never molded, nothing.

    What troubles me is coming down in the morning to clean up from a party and finding a bowl of un-melted ice cream on the table. Room temperature. Yikes!



    In fact, it's normal for me (when I was eating ice cream regularly) to put it out for a bit to soften it for scooping (but not too much to cause ice crystals). So I call bogus on this.

    . . .

    I'd suggest you do a little research before calling another post "bogus."






    I'd suggest you do a little research before you call Bryer's "ice cream."

    ETA: watching clickbaity youtube videos isn't research.

    Here's a blog from someone that tested to see if the stories about Bryers not melting were true (not that blogs are any better than videos).
    Spoiler: Myth busted.

    https://spoonuniversity.com/lifestyle/i-tested-to-see-if-it-is-true-that-breyers-ice-cream-doesn-t-melt

    All of this!

    Also, much better ice cream out there.
    edited November 2019
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Member Posts: 7,421 Member Member Posts: 7,421 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Hollis100 wrote: »
    Having worked in a food research laboratory at Procter & Gamble's Food Research Center Winton Hill Technical Center I can say with pretty much confidence that food processing is not done to make the food more dangerous, less stable or more expensive. If they do it, it is to make the food safer, more long lasting, tastier or to comply with the bureaucrats. And, having cultured household kitchen surfaces to see what kind of mold and bacteria finds its way into containers after they have been opened in your kitchen, I would also predict that there is not a residential kitchen you would be comfortable having as a food processing plant. Fine for fixing dinner. Making jerky from raw beef, deer or fish without preservatives? Not so much.

    I get you. I understand. I've recently taken college science classes.

    However, I find it -- I don't know the word, maybe Twilight Zone-ish -- to fish a year old McDonald's French fry off a car floor and discover it's in perfect condition. Never molded, nothing.

    Wow, I thought my car was dirty, and all I have are old soda bottles and work documents, none from a year ago.

    I am skeptical that the fry would be in perfect condition, but if you have consumed it, I guess I bow to your expertise.

    I'm guessing you've never cleaned out a vehicle where little kids who eat in the car are riders. You can find fries that look perfect to the naked eye that you know have been in there a while. Now part of an apple, banana another story.

    Looking and being are not the same. Over the winter I wouldn't expect anything to mold in my car, for example, but if I did find food (ugh, and like I said my car is filthy), I certainly would not pop it in my mouth.

    IME, fast food fries (like other fries) aren't tasty at all if not hot, so I don't believe they are unchanged after a year. I have never eaten something that old, granted.

    Recently I asked if I could use leftover candy from Halloween last year and got enough "no way, it would taste bad" that I tossed it. Speaking of processed things.
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Member Posts: 5,084 Member Member Posts: 5,084 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Homemade ice cream is easy to make. The very most custard-y kinds melt less, in my experience. Not because there are weird ingredients, though they are slightly different as to ingredients. The custard-y kind is a little more processed than the non-custard-y kinds, though, i.e., more cooking and whipping, mostly.

    I doubt whether a commercial frozen dessert's melting qualities are a wonderful indicator of their food-like-ness. Isn't that why there's an ingredients list?

    IMO, this is kind of silly. "Nutritious" is meaningful. "Calorie dense" is meaningful. "Nutrition dense" is meaningful.

    "Traditional food" (vs. highly extracted modern food ingredient) is possibly meaningful.

    "Processed" or "not processed", not so meaningful.

    Just my opinion.

    Don't you touch my velveeta mac and cheese.

    I think I already ceded you my lifetime share of those disgusting Oreos you like so much, didn't I? You can't have all of everything.

    (You can have most of the Velveeta, too, though.)

    I can't have all of everything?

    How disappointing...
  • smantha32smantha32 Member Posts: 7,002 Member Member Posts: 7,002 Member
    Kathryn247 wrote: »
    I don't get it. The main ingredients are turkey, honey, water, and salt, so it's mostly "real" ingredients. 70 calories isn't bad for 28g of snack, especially one with this much protein.

    Heck, I think I might try these. Thanks for the tip!

    I also eat jerky a lot for the protein. It's relatively low cal and it's filling.
  • KrazyKrissyyKrazyKrissyy Member Posts: 322 Member Member Posts: 322 Member
    If you need a low sodium snack to hold you off, eat a cucumber and/or a bowl of shirataki noodles. Or chug coffee. This is what I do.
    edited November 2019
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