Walkers in the runners-only lanes. It's so common.

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Replies

  • spartan_d
    spartan_d Posts: 727 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    spartan_d wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    Have you spoken to the gym staff about this? It's their responsibility to enforce the rules. If they don't and it's still causing a problem I'd be more forceful about it. Maybe they can put up larger signs or notify the regular "offenders" in a discreet way.

    I have, and at more than one gym. By and large, they don't care. In fact, they often keep silent even when they see this happening.

    It's not hard to guess why. They usually aren't eager to enforce the rules. The rules only matter when an accident happens or when they have already decided to kick someone out.

    As for being more forceful about it... I do that on occasion with mixed results.

    Recently, I did tell one woman that she was in a runners lane. I told her twice, without anger, since she didn't seem to hear me the first time. She snapped my photo and tried to report me to the management. (Thankfully, the manager was sensible. A bit weak-willed and overly accommodating to her, but at least he understood that I was just being reasonable.)

    On a related note... this same manager said that we shouldn't confront the offenders directly. To avoid conflict, we are supposed to stop our workouts, get off the track, look for a staff member, and ask that staff member to intervene. He says this is because "everyone has their own perspective" and asking another gym member to obey track rules could be perceived as harassment. Sigh.
    That's the issue. In my gym, I'm ADAMANT about people not reracking their weights. I will look at equipment being used by someone who may be new or someone I've never seen before and if they leave it unracked, I will let them know about it. It's come to the point now that we're not seeing much of weights being left on equipment and members are being respectful. It works out for everyone.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    You're a hero. You understand that gentle enforcement of the rules will prevent problems from occuring, whereas others let things slide (lack of track etiquette, etc) until a problem does occur.
  • katsheare
    katsheare Posts: 1,025 Member
    MPDean wrote: »
    Here in blighty we walk on the left, sword arm nearest to middle in case a duel breaks out.

    Oh, not down south we don't. Folks in he Home Counties seem to be perfectly happy taking up all the space and ignoring anyone else who might be there. Maybe I need to start actually carrying a sword...
  • gradchica27
    gradchica27 Posts: 777 Member
    I’m watching this right now. The worst is when the walkers clump up and you have to start on the inside, dodge to the middle and put on a super fast spurt to get to the outside lane before the ever so sightly faster than the others walker closes the gap. Sometimes the gap closes and you have to stop short before you hit the walker in the middle (which at my gym is designated “jog” as opposed to the “walk” and “run” lanes.

    Further issues caused by the befuddled walker who kinda realizes they’re in the wrong spot when they hear your footfalls behind them and jukes like a squirrel in front of a car and you don’t know where they’re trying to go. I’ve tripped on one and tripped myself trying to change direction when they dodged back and forth.

    To say nothing of those who walk holding hands next to a third walker. Impenetrable barrier.

    The worst offenders at my gym are elderly so everyone feels like a heel saying something, but they’d be in the worst shape if someone hit them and they fell.
  • vim_n_vigor
    vim_n_vigor Posts: 4,093 Member
    Well, there is a track here where the walking lanes are elevated and at an angle. Many of the older, or injured walkers are not physically able to walk at that angle comfortably and the running lanes are flat. I suspect at least in this area why most of the walkers ignore the walking lanes.
  • debrakgoogins
    debrakgoogins Posts: 2,034 Member
    I ran a half marathon in the UK last year. I wasn't aware the passing lane there is the opposite of what it is in the US. To any runners who dodged me at the 2019 Great Stirling Run before I grabbed a clue when I slowed down, I sincerely apologize.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,892 Member
    edited January 2020
    Well, there is a track here where the walking lanes are elevated and at an angle. Many of the older, or injured walkers are not physically able to walk at that angle comfortably and the running lanes are flat. I suspect at least in this area why most of the walkers ignore the walking lanes.

    I don't currently use or have access to a place with an indoor track, but typically when I've seen them they are identical, and OP hasn't said anything to make me think there's something that makes the walking lanes unavailable to older walkers.

    Here are examples of what I've seen:

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  • erjones11
    erjones11 Posts: 422 Member
    Reading through all of this reaffirms my desire to not go to gyms and why I don't.

    I would not want to inadvertently mess up someones workout At the same time my workouts are important to me and I don't want to be interrupted or use equipment that is icky or unorganized.

    Just want do my thing all by myself especially when it comes to working out.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,892 Member
    Inadvertently messing up someone's workout isn't really a risk.
  • spartan_d
    spartan_d Posts: 727 Member
    edited January 2020
    @lemurcat2 is right. In the situation that I described, the walking lane was not elevated or cambered. In fact, it's rather unusual that the walking lanes that @vim_n_vigor described are cambered in that manner. Also, when tracks have a bit of elevation on the outermost lane, it is typically to make running a bit easier.
  • allother94
    allother94 Posts: 588 Member
    edited January 2020
    Uggghh... this sounds so frustratingly annoying. I would probably deliberately brush by them every time...not enough to knock them down but enough to be annoying to them. I suppose they would complain about that rather than get the hint though.

    I always make a big show out of going around them, we only have 2 lanes at my gym and a wall around the outside. I’ll running around them fast and pretend to almost hit the wall and stumble a little. The next time I come around, they are already looking for me and get COMPLETELY out of the way.

    That being said, if you can go around them on a bigger track, go around them. We live in a society people.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,695 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    spartan_d wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    Have you spoken to the gym staff about this? It's their responsibility to enforce the rules. If they don't and it's still causing a problem I'd be more forceful about it. Maybe they can put up larger signs or notify the regular "offenders" in a discreet way.

    I have, and at more than one gym. By and large, they don't care. In fact, they often keep silent even when they see this happening.

    It's not hard to guess why. They usually aren't eager to enforce the rules. The rules only matter when an accident happens or when they have already decided to kick someone out.

    As for being more forceful about it... I do that on occasion with mixed results.

    Recently, I did tell one woman that she was in a runners lane. I told her twice, without anger, since she didn't seem to hear me the first time. She snapped my photo and tried to report me to the management. (Thankfully, the manager was sensible. A bit weak-willed and overly accommodating to her, but at least he understood that I was just being reasonable.)

    On a related note... this same manager said that we shouldn't confront the offenders directly. To avoid conflict, we are supposed to stop our workouts, get off the track, look for a staff member, and ask that staff member to intervene. He says this is because "everyone has their own perspective" and asking another gym member to obey track rules could be perceived as harassment. Sigh.
    That's the issue. In my gym, I'm ADAMANT about people not reracking their weights. I will look at equipment being used by someone who may be new or someone I've never seen before and if they leave it unracked, I will let them know about it. It's come to the point now that we're not seeing much of weights being left on equipment and members are being respectful. It works out for everyone.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    I went from a YMCA where I saw the staff reracking when needed (and it wasn't much of a problem) to an LA Fitness where the staff clearly didn't rerack at the end of the day or do anything to enforce the rules and it was super annoying to always have to hunt for dumb bells or be tripping over them >.<
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,695 Member
    spartan_d wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    Have you spoken to the gym staff about this? It's their responsibility to enforce the rules. If they don't and it's still causing a problem I'd be more forceful about it. Maybe they can put up larger signs or notify the regular "offenders" in a discreet way.

    I have, and at more than one gym. By and large, they don't care. In fact, they often keep silent even when they see this happening.

    It's not hard to guess why. They usually aren't eager to enforce the rules. The rules only matter when an accident happens or when they have already decided to kick someone out.

    As for being more forceful about it... I do that on occasion with mixed results.

    Recently, I did tell one woman that she was in a runners lane. I told her twice, without anger, since she didn't seem to hear me the first time. She snapped my photo and tried to report me to the management. (Thankfully, the manager was sensible. A bit weak-willed and overly accommodating to her, but at least he understood that I was just being reasonable.)

    On a related note... this same manager said that we shouldn't confront the offenders directly. To avoid conflict, we are supposed to stop our workouts, get off the track, look for a staff member, and ask that staff member to intervene. He says this is because "everyone has their own perspective" and asking another gym member to obey track rules could be perceived as harassment. Sigh.

    Does this woman still walk in the wrong lane? What about the other example(s) you've mentioned?

    I'm ornery enough I would stop my running every single time and get a staff member. Hopefully that would encourage them to do better about signage.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,695 Member
    I had to switch track times because of women who were always drenched in perfume. GAG.
  • psychod787
    psychod787 Posts: 4,088 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    spartan_d wrote: »
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    Have you spoken to the gym staff about this? It's their responsibility to enforce the rules. If they don't and it's still causing a problem I'd be more forceful about it. Maybe they can put up larger signs or notify the regular "offenders" in a discreet way.

    I have, and at more than one gym. By and large, they don't care. In fact, they often keep silent even when they see this happening.

    It's not hard to guess why. They usually aren't eager to enforce the rules. The rules only matter when an accident happens or when they have already decided to kick someone out.

    As for being more forceful about it... I do that on occasion with mixed results.

    Recently, I did tell one woman that she was in a runners lane. I told her twice, without anger, since she didn't seem to hear me the first time. She snapped my photo and tried to report me to the management. (Thankfully, the manager was sensible. A bit weak-willed and overly accommodating to her, but at least he understood that I was just being reasonable.)

    On a related note... this same manager said that we shouldn't confront the offenders directly. To avoid conflict, we are supposed to stop our workouts, get off the track, look for a staff member, and ask that staff member to intervene. He says this is because "everyone has their own perspective" and asking another gym member to obey track rules could be perceived as harassment. Sigh.

    Does this woman still walk in the wrong lane? What about the other example(s) you've mentioned?

    I'm ornery enough I would stop my running every single time and get a staff member. Hopefully that would encourage them to do better about signage.

    I don't get that vibe from you....
  • tuckerrj
    tuckerrj Posts: 1,453 Member
    Yeah I try my best to ask innocently, "Did you see the sign that said the inside lane is for walkers?". Or, "The sign there says no standing on the track, did you see it?". Now the second time (especially on the same day) "Do I need to get a staff member to explain the rules to you?". Confrontation is not always a bad thing. More than once I've gone to the staff and they do NOTHING, because they're afraid of confrontation.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 25,214 Member
    tuckerrj wrote: »
    Yeah I try my best to ask innocently, "Did you see the sign that said the inside lane is for walkers?". Or, "The sign there says no standing on the track, did you see it?". Now the second time (especially on the same day) "Do I need to get a staff member to explain the rules to you?". Confrontation is not always a bad thing. More than once I've gone to the staff and they do NOTHING, because they're afraid of confrontation.

    "Gosh, I'd hate for a careless runner to crash into you - safer to stay in the walker lanes!" (point at sign) might be a good start, too.

    I may've corrected thirteen dozen people on their bad behavior already this week, but exercising that justifiable level of irritation may not be the most effective strategy for correcting a new walker who missed the signs, and is hearing from a runner for the first time . . . or maybe even a subsequent one.

    I don't run (or walk) on tracks, but think I get better results from being friendly with fishermen and other powerboaters (thanking them for politeness, apologizing when it's
    me who messed up, explaining how we can accommodate each other), than do fellow rowers who just yell at them and flip them off because the previous powerboater(s) was a jerk who didn't follow standard navigation rules.

    I figure people are likely to be more accommodating when they think you're a real person, a nice person, rather than a hot-headed jerk. Call me optimistic, I guess.

    And that's not to mention that I don't need the stress that comes from being incensed about stupid, admittedly annoying, things other people do, over which I have limited influence/control.

    Others' mileage seems to vary. :)
  • spartan_d
    spartan_d Posts: 727 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »

    Does this woman still walk in the wrong lane? What about the other example(s) you've mentioned?
    Thanks for asking. I saw this same woman yesterday, and she was still walking slowly in the wrong lane. Except toward the end of her "workout," when she finally moved to one of the walking lanes. Perhaps she finally noticed me and feared that I might report her.
    I'm ornery enough I would stop my running every single time and get a staff member. Hopefully that would encourage them to do better about signage.
    I was looking for a staff member so that I could report her and this other woman who was wandering all about the lanes. The second woman is the one I mentioned previously -- the one who often straddles to lanes and might have some mental disability.

    None were nearby. And honestly, this sort of thing happens often enough that they must surely notice. They just don't care.
  • JustSomeEm
    JustSomeEm Posts: 19,814 MFP Moderator
    Hey folks - if you read the original post in this thread, or even the thread title, you'll realize this discussion is about walkers at gyms who use the lanes on the track that are designated for runners. You may also realize that this topic in no way mentions driving too slowly in the left lane OR parking in handicap spots.

    This thread has been cleaned up to remove off-topic discussion. If you'd like to discuss those who drive too slowly in the wrong lane OR the necessary merits for using handicap spots, please start your own thread.

    If you'd like to discuss the cleaning of this thread or moderation in general, please shoot me (or any other moderator or staff member) a PM. In the meantime, please feel free to review our community guidelines: http://www.myfitnesspal.com/welcome/guidelines

    JustSomeEm
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    My gym does not have designated lanes per se, just signs saying "Walkers, please stay in the inside lane". I spoke to runners and they said they almost never have a problem with walkers being in the way. The only times they did were when a group of 3 or more were together and stretched out over most of the track. When that happens, they mention it at the desk when they pass it and an employee is ready when the walkers get near the desk so they can remind them to stay in one lane.

    We do the inner and outer lane instead of left or right because the direction of traffic alternates between clockwise and counterclockwise each day.