Is Expensive Workout Clothing Worth It?

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Replies

  • Psychgrrl
    Psychgrrl Posts: 3,177 Member
    hesn92 wrote: »
    Well, i've heard good things about lulu but they don't come in my size soooo.......

    I am a Fabletics VIP, and if you were to buy Fabletics at list price, it's way too expensive for me. But, a few times a year they do huge sales and that's when I buy. I get the sale price on top of the already discounted VIP price and honestly it comes out to being really affordable and my staple items from them are very high quality.

    Good shoes are definitely worth the extra money. I probably won't ever wear anything other than Brooks.

    TJ Maxx is a great place for discount brand names, like stated above. Even if it has a defect I don't mind.

    I think the people who swear by a certain brand name and dress in it head to toe are more so doing it for a self-branding purpose, which might make you feel like Serena Williams but you aren't getting her endorsement money LOL

    Glad to hear you like fabletics. Never tried them and I want to. Does the VIP membership cost money? Every time I try to do the 2 for $24 deal it never works. (Like, when I get to check out it doesn't ring it up correctly) so I gave up.

    I love Fabletics--been a member since they started. The VIP membership doesn't cost anything, you just have to "opt out" that month or you'll be charged a $49.95 credit which you then spend on merchandise. I have a reminder in my calendar at the start of the month and I either opt out or buy something. I forgotten once in about five years. I just used the money a few months later.
  • NorthCascades
    NorthCascades Posts: 10,970 Member
    GreenValli wrote: »
    ... But if you have the money and WANT to look good at the gym, ...

    Part of what makes this impossible to have a definitive answer for is how many different things "exercise" can mean to different people.

    One thing I've done - and this wouldn't work in the gym - is go to thrift stores and buy used cashmere sweaters. These make fantastic midlayers for hiking and cycling in cold temperatures. They're warm, but they breathe well, and they'll still keep you warm if they get wet. Plus they only cost $10 so I don't mind abusing them. But it's never below freezing at the gym, it's usually too warm in there.
  • saintor1
    saintor1 Posts: 376 Member
    I tried some jackets for cross-countrying and always end wet. Winter, of course. Any recommendation?
  • Legs_McGee23
    Legs_McGee23 Posts: 114 Member
    I have 3 pairs of workout shorts I bought from Athleta for $60 a piece. I bought them 8 or 9 years ago and they've been washed hundreds (thousands?) of times and they still look new. And I have some pricey running shorts that are of similar age. I think they were a worthy investment. I've got a mix of expensive and cheaper stuff ... I want my workout clothes to be comfortable, not doing anything weird when I move - and I want to look cute.
  • muskieschaef
    muskieschaef Posts: 27 Member
    I say no. I just wear a t-shirt and shorts. Sometimes I will wear a hooded sweatshirt
  • SchweddyGirl
    SchweddyGirl Posts: 244 Member
    My choice of activewear comes down to how reflective it is. Since I sometimes run after work (which is currently at 5 AM since I work the night shift) I focus heavily on reflective gear. So I will often opt to pay more for the highly reflective gear than for lower-priced pieces without any. One item I don't care about how expensive they are is my running shoes. If they are the shoes that work for me and they cost $120 then I will pay $120 (which I just did actually, since it was time for a replacement).
  • aokoye
    aokoye Posts: 3,495 Member
    edited January 2020
    I primarily care about how well the clothing functions for me and how comfortable it is. That includes neon/reflectability, water-repellency, and how warm or cool something will keep me.

    I am a big fan of my neon Gore cycling jacket that I use for rowing because my coaches and other rowers/coxswains can see me on the water, it keeps my upper body as dry as one could expect (not as dry as if I was cycling but in similar weather conditions there's simply less water involved when I'm cycling), and it's light. I suspect I'll end up replacing it not because it's worn out but because it'll eventually be too large for me.

    I also am a big fan of cycling specific clothing. It's an issue of comfort and function. I definitely only wear jerseys outside, but cycling shorts/bib shorts are a necessity for me and I definitely prefer bibs. I also fully intend on getting a Proviz cycling jacket when I start commuting by bike when I move for grad school. It's not about the brand for the money, but as a driver I am forever grateful when I see cyclists and runners wearing them because they are just so easy to see (they're exceedingly visible from a launch or another boat when you're rowing before daylight in the morning).
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,860 Member
    Here's a picture of me from March, 2012. In it, I'm wearing two pieces of Arc'teryx gear, the jacket, and the neck gaiter which I'm using as a hat. I've worn that jacket almost every day from October until March almost every year, and the gaiter an awful lot too. I still have and use both of them. Eight years is a long time for stuff like this to last when you use it so much. Arc'teryx is notoriously expensive, until you consider how much use you get out of it. Also, their gear functions very well, and tends to look good as a bonus. So I'd say yes, at least in some cases expensive gear is worth it. I don't have any Nike, North Face, or Under Armor, I'm not saying all expensive clothing is worth it or good. Even among Arc'teryx in whom I have a lot of confidence, I research every piece of gear I think about buying,...

    It's been I don't know how many years, but my Marmot dry climb windshirt is still going strong. It was a splurge for me back when I only bought cheap clothes, gear - but an Editor's choice review from a backpacking /mountaineering magazine sold me. So warm for being so light without restricting movement whatsoever.

    My sports bras are all Under Armour (but which brand fits best will be individual).

    My running shirts are all tech wick... Various brands (generally from sales at major races, or race shirts from the race). Most of my leggings and shorts are cheap. I used to buy pricier Under Armor or Nike Pro for shorts... They used to make longer 7" inseam shorts with the style of waistband I prefer, but they both discontinued the longer shorts. Most of my leggings are Champion (Target)... Sized up with the waist tie tied tighter (these tend to not want to ride down as much as ones that are very snug on thighs).
  • ritzvin
    ritzvin Posts: 2,860 Member
    GreenValli wrote: »
    ... But if you have the money and WANT to look good at the gym, ...

    Part of what makes this impossible to have a definitive answer for is how many different things "exercise" can mean to different people.

    One thing I've done - and this wouldn't work in the gym - is go to thrift stores and buy used cashmere sweaters. These make fantastic midlayers for hiking and cycling in cold temperatures. They're warm, but they breathe well, and they'll still keep you warm if they get wet. Plus they only cost $10 so I don't mind abusing them. But it's never below freezing at the gym, it's usually too warm in there.

    Cuddl Duds are a surprisingly favorite baselayer for me. (near the underwear section at Target or one of the other X-Mart type stores, less than $20). So very comfortable compared to my EMS brand ones (although the latter are warmer so still have their place if I'm mountaineering in winter in the ADK or similar).
  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    My workout tights have to be plain black with no mesh inserts. Then they look tolerable and go with everything. They also have to pass the squat test. Most of them are from a Nike outlet store and the current batch have lasted me three years and still going strong. Tops can be any sweat wicking whatever. I like to have a few that are made of a particularly thin fabric as they are easy to launder in a hotel sink when we go away. Sports bras have to fit well but I don't care about brand. Mostly they're Shock Absorber. Shoes have to be a good fit and fairly minimalist so I tend to be limited there. Adidas men's ankle socks are fantastic!
  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,479 Member
    I'm of the old school mentality. If you're going to work out at the gym, who gives a crap what you look like? Personally just some good old sweats (unless it's really hot, I cover up) that don't smell is all I need. I'd rather put my money into what really makes me look better and that's the food I can buy with the money I save from not spending on expensive clothing. When I hear a pair of pants is $50-$100, you can bet that's NOT a pair I would ever spend money on.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

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  • emmamcgarity
    emmamcgarity Posts: 1,593 Member
    When I started working out I was a size larger and still losing weight. I picked up items mostly at Walmart. For running, I was professionally fitted and bought high quality shoes. I mostly work out at home and run in the neighborhood. And most of these items have been fine for my needs. I picked up a pair of Target capris after work one day that offered compression and a phone pocket. I really like that phone pocket a lot. I will likely buy more just for the pocket. Once it’s Summer, I’ll need to replace my large shorts with mediums or smalls. I’ll likely look into more of the moisture wicking items since the Summer heat is more of a problem where I live than the few days of the year we have cold weather. I may be willing to pay more to bear the outdoor heat at that time.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,881 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Shoes: It matters what you do with shoes, too.

    I don't use bike shoes for spin, even though real cyclists say I should. Inexpensive shoes are working fine.

    As an on-water rower, though, I may spend more than average on shoes: They can be several thousand dollars a pair . . . if you think of them as coming with a free rowing shell attached. ;) (I think the boat vendors' price lists would argue that it's closer to the other way around!) Yes, rowers' shoes are attached to the boat, essentially bolted on. They can be switched out, but that's a rare thing. And they needn't fit especially well, either.

    But the net result is there's really no need for me to buy expensive athletic shoes, as I don't do "on my feet" athletic activities, or much walking. (I do buy everyday shoes, moderately priced, that I know work for me for the amount of walking I actually do.)

    An unrelated aside: The leggings from Walmart (I think the ones I have are Danskin) have proven very sturdy, despite their low price point. When my obese-sized ones got too loose for athletic use, I threaded a cord through the waistband fabric tunnel, and now still wear them as knockabout pants at home. (It's been nearly 5 years since they fit as leggings, and they were few years old then, but the fabric isn't unacceptably thin, seams still intact, all that jazz.) I still have a few of the XL t-shirts, huge on me now, but suitable for yard work, still in decent shape, too. Cost per month very, very low. Pennies. ;) ). Yup, I'm cheap. ;) And I like to use things until they're used up.

    I have a pair of Danskin leggings from Walmart that are about used up...but I got at least 10 years out of them :)

    I'm not crazy about the newer ones - last time I checked the fabric felt weird, although it was still cotton and spandex.
  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 27,881 Member
    saintor1 wrote: »
    I tried some jackets for cross-countrying and always end wet. Winter, of course. Any recommendation?

    Wet because you sweat or wet because not waterproof?

    If sweat, I always start out a little cold, as I know I will warm up, and layer with pieces that can be taken off and tied around my waist, a hat that can be stuffed in a pocket, a scarf that can be untied, etc.

    Can't help you with not waterproof - I lift weights or practice yoga on rainy days.
  • vollkornbloedchen
    vollkornbloedchen Posts: 2,243 Member
    edited January 2020
    I'd say it depends (as usual ...)
    In the beginning, when not that trained, or still trying to find out if you REALLY like this, there usually is no need to get the High End equipment.
    When becoming more ambitioned you will soon find out that low-cost equipment has it's deficits.
    Most likely you still don't need the High End equipment, but you will, for sure, learn to value the advantages of better material.
    Get the equipment you need to fulfill your needs. Not more and definitely not less.
    If in doubt, ask others doing your sport on about your level what they use and how they like it.
    Learn from them and you will avoid one or the other mis-purchase.
  • AliNouveau
    AliNouveau Posts: 36,287 Member
    Lululemon are magic and make everyone's butt look amazing. Shop the sale rack though you can get some amazing deals.
  • adotbaby
    adotbaby Posts: 199 Member
    I get most of my gear at thrift stores- UA, Danskin, MPG, VS, RBK, LLBean- sometimes Ebay, most for less than $5.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,171 Member
    edited January 2020
    In some cases, yes high priced brands are necessary but in other cases they aren't. Which is or isn't depends on the person. I will pay a higher price for my swimwear because I need something that will stand up to the chemicals and salt while spending about 9 hours a week in the pool. A good chlorine resistant suit will run between $70 and $100 and last a year or more. H2O is my favorite and they are closer to $125 but last up to 3 years. Non chlorine resistant can run about $30 and fall apart after 3 months. I also will spend whatever is needed for the right shoes for walking. Leggings, shorts, shirts, etc. are not nearly as important to me so I go as cheap as possible.