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Body Positive Workout Clothes Women's Thing, Not Men's?

13

Replies

  • magnusthenerd
    magnusthenerd Posts: 1,207 Member
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    jdh419 wrote: »
    I am 55 years old and only wear sweats and old tees to the gym. I am not one to fall for discriminated marketing. So many of the tights are just over the top tight! I just don't understand why women still allow themselves to be subjected to the sexualization of our bodies! Working out should be in a comfortable, stress free environment where we are looked at as equal; not some sex kitten in pants so tight you can see our labia! That's just my, humble opinion.

    men wear leggings too.
    what i wear is up to me. what you decide to sexualize is up to you.

    In the summer, I'll also see men running in very short shorts. I trust they know what works best for their preferences and workout, I doubt they've fallen for discriminatory marketing or are somehow trying to tempt onlookers.
    I would if I thought it would work. There are people of any gender that do wear things wanting to be sexualized.
    But yeah, as at least a practical matter, you probably should assume that self objectifying is not someone's purpose.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    mbaker566 wrote: »
    jdh419 wrote: »
    I am 55 years old and only wear sweats and old tees to the gym. I am not one to fall for discriminated marketing. So many of the tights are just over the top tight! I just don't understand why women still allow themselves to be subjected to the sexualization of our bodies! Working out should be in a comfortable, stress free environment where we are looked at as equal; not some sex kitten in pants so tight you can see our labia! That's just my, humble opinion.

    men wear leggings too.
    what i wear is up to me. what you decide to sexualize is up to you.

    In the summer, I'll also see men running in very short shorts. I trust they know what works best for their preferences and workout, I doubt they've fallen for discriminatory marketing or are somehow trying to tempt onlookers.
    I would if I thought it would work. There are people of any gender that do wear things wanting to be sexualized.
    But yeah, as at least a practical matter, you probably should assume that self objectifying is not someone's purpose.

    I'm not saying it never happens, I'm just saying my default assumption is that people are wearing what is most comfortable and practical for them.
  • jdh419
    jdh419 Posts: 65 Member
    edited January 2020
    I've never had an issue wearing my sweats and tees in the last 3 decades that I've been wearing them to the gym. They've never got bunched up and I've never tripped or got hung up on any type of machinery. I am comfortable in loose fitting clothing at the gym and I think you guys are judging me because I wear baggy clothes at the gym. I like going to the gym to exercise. The end!
  • jdh419
    jdh419 Posts: 65 Member
    edited January 2020
    "All of the discussion I have read was in direct response to you passing judgment on what others wear. Can you point out one post that stated you should wear something other than what you enjoy wearing?"


    I guess you haven't read them all. All I did was post my opinion then I was bombarded.
  • jdh419
    jdh419 Posts: 65 Member
    hesn92 wrote: »
    Don't get me wrong, I think there are a lot of people who wear certain things to *accentuate* body parts and make themselves look more attractive (think leggings that are cinched down the butt crack to make their butt look bigger etc) So it's not all about functionality (unless I'm missing something about the cinch on the butt)

    But I mean if someone feels better wearing something that makes them look cuter who am I to judge. People should wear what they want and it's not their responsibility to worry about whether other people like it or not.

    I feel like this debate has gone awry lol

    I feel like it's gone awry too.
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    jdh419 wrote: »
    I've never had an issue wearing my sweats and tees in the last 3 decades that I've been wearing them to the gym. They've never got bunched up and I've never tripped or got hung up on any type of machinery. I am comfortable in loose fitting clothing at the gym and I think you guys are judging me because I wear baggy clothes at the gym. I like going to the gym to exercise. The end!

    Nobody is judging you for wearing what you prefer and is most comfortable for you. We're simply pointing out that not everyone shares your preferences.
  • SnifterPug
    SnifterPug Posts: 746 Member
    I have not read the whole thread so apologies if someone has already said similar. I live in a part of the UK where men take as much interest in their appearance as women. There are at least as many specialist barbers as hairdressers on our high street and you see plenty of men in health/relaxation spas. They take a great deal of care about and interest in how they dress. However, at the gym, even while their hair may be pomaded their apparel is purely functional. For all I know they are wearing designer kit but it looks the same as everything else. I've never seen a man turn up in shorts with fancy mesh panels or a bright print. The loudest their tops get is hi-vis yellow all over, but normally it would be a regular T shirt or a muscle vest in a grisly shade of grey. All the above points apply regardless of their physique.
  • bathsheba_c
    bathsheba_c Posts: 1,866 Member
    This advertising appeals to me because, when I first wanted to invest in actual workout clothes that would be comfortable and whisk away sweat, I COULD NOT FIND THEM IN MY SIZE. And this was going to serious sportswear stores and being portly but not obese.

    Color me cynical, but they aren’t being body positive so much as they are exploiting the fact that they are producing clothes for a market that is drastically underserved.