Half Marathon training plan recommendations?

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Hiya!

I'm running my second half marathon this year, and having managed to get round the first one (a victory in itself!) in 2 1/2 hours I was looking for a solid plan to follow to see if I can cut that down a bit!

I regularly run 4 times a week and cover about 20km, and the half is in May. I was looking at the Hal Higdon plan but wanted to see if anyone can suggest other plans as I'm not 100% sure!

Also, is it normal for a plan to only get up to 10 miles in long runs before the race? I seem to remember my first one covering further distances (but then it was a few years ago I could be wrong!)

Thanks in advance! x

Replies

  • tapwaters
    tapwaters Posts: 428 Member
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    I use one through my Garmin and Columbus Running Company, my local running shop. You might have a local running shop with plans, support, and group runs for free!
  • dewd2
    dewd2 Posts: 2,449 Member
    edited January 2020
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    Yeah, 10 miles is not unusual but if you want to get to the next level you should look at other plans. I'm a HUGE fan of Jack Daniels (the coach, not the whiskey ;) ). Check out his book for some next level plans (I use the 2Q plans for my marathons). Be warned your weekly distance will increase as the plans get more advanced.
  • SchweddyGirl
    SchweddyGirl Posts: 244 Member
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    There are so many out there, you really just need to research the one that will work for you. If you are wanting to get faster then you should be looking for a plan that has some speed work. Or, if you find a plan that works for your schedule and it doesn't have speed work then do one of the runs on a fairly hilly course (if you don't have a hilly course, bridge repeats work great).

    There are so many out there though, you really just need to find one that works for you. Hal Higdon is usually the go-to recommendation, but there are the plans from Coach Jenny (https://www.jennyhadfield.com/training-plans/half-marathon/), Garmin has training plans you can use, the BAA has a good one (https://www.baa.org/races/baa-half-marathon/train/leveltwo), and Cooling Running has some (http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/144.shtml).

    I also agree about finding a local running group. They often will know about free speed days offered in your area. Here in Memphis, the University of Memphis has free speed work on Tuesday nights that is open to the public. You might be able to find something similar in your area.
  • SchweddyGirl
    SchweddyGirl Posts: 244 Member
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    dewd2 wrote: »
    Yeah, 10 miles is not unusual but if you want to get to the next level you should look at other plans. I'm a HUGE fan of Jack Daniels (the coach, not the whiskey ;) ). Check out his book for some next level plans (I use the 2Q plans for my marathons). Be warned your weekly distance will increase as the plans get more advanced.

    I am a huge fan of his runSMART project.
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,676 Member
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    Since this is not your first and you have plenty of time to build up a better base, you might look at Higdon's intermediate plans instead of novice. The intermediate 2 goes up to 12 miles and includes some speedwork to help you get faster. Just running more miles each week will also work to make you faster. I had a big improvement when I went from running 20 mpw to 35.

    If you really want to improve, then look at Pfitzinger or Hansons plans. They include a lot more miles and speedwork.
  • emmamcgarity
    emmamcgarity Posts: 1,593 Member
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    dewd2 wrote: »
    Yeah, 10 miles is not unusual but if you want to get to the next level you should look at other plans. I'm a HUGE fan of Jack Daniels (the coach, not the whiskey ;) ). Check out his book for some next level plans (I use the 2Q plans for my marathons). Be warned your weekly distance will increase as the plans get more advanced.

    I am a huge fan of his runSMART project.

    His runSMART is what my local run club bases it’s marathon and half marathon training program on. Then they support the training plans with scheduled group runs that fit the program and incorporate some warm up races of increasing lengths throughout the season.
  • caffieneaddict
    caffieneaddict Posts: 8 Member
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    There are so many out there, you really just need to research the one that will work for you. If you are wanting to get faster then you should be looking for a plan that has some speed work. Or, if you find a plan that works for your schedule and it doesn't have speed work then do one of the runs on a fairly hilly course (if you don't have a hilly course, bridge repeats work great).

    There are so many out there though, you really just need to find one that works for you. Hal Higdon is usually the go-to recommendation, but there are the plans from Coach Jenny (https://www.jennyhadfield.com/training-plans/half-marathon/), Garmin has training plans you can use, the BAA has a good one (https://www.baa.org/races/baa-half-marathon/train/leveltwo), and Cooling Running has some (http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_4/144.shtml).

    I also agree about finding a local running group. They often will know about free speed days offered in your area. Here in Memphis, the University of Memphis has free speed work on Tuesday nights that is open to the public. You might be able to find something similar in your area.

    Thanks! I'll have a look at those plans. I do know of a running group in my area so I'll get in contact with them and try and get involved.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,885 Member
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    Hal Higdon's plans are free online and I have used and liked them.

    I'm also another fan of local running groups.