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Veggies, HELP!

I wasn't raised eating veggies, I've always claimed that I don't like them, but mostly I've never tried them.
Now at 35 I need to get my act together and start incorporating them into my daily life, but I have no idea where to start, my kids don't eat veg because I don't.
Where do I start?
Please advise x
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Replies

  • RelCanonical
    RelCanonical Posts: 3,883 Member
    Do you have any that you currently like? Start with those, and prepare them in a way that’s fun, like roasting or frying, to help transition your palette. No need to start out eating them raw or dry (unless that’s preferred) to start out. I used to not like onions but I liked onion rings, and as I ate them, I came to appreciate the taste and texture of onion, and now I love onions in general.
  • mnbvcxzlkjhgfdsa12
    mnbvcxzlkjhgfdsa12 Posts: 188 Member
    When it comes to veggies something is better than nothing. When you find something you/the kids like have it everyday, and gradually add in more.

    I find textures really matter. I don’t like anything mushy, so I am careful not to over cook (most veggies just need a few minutes in boiling water and they’re done). Also don’t limit yourself to just boiling veggies, I like to roast them for more texture - I love roasted squash and zucchini, but dislike them cooked in other ways for example.

    Embrace frozen and even canned - easy and nutritious. Look out for salt in canned veggies if that concerns you. From someone who has worked hard to increase veggie intake, and has a small go to list, these are the ones I eat every week:

    Frozen peas
    Frozen sweetcorn (kernel corn)
    Carrots
    Zucchini
    Yellow crook-necked squash
    Butternut squash
    Green beans (French beans)
    Asparagus
    Canned hearts of palms
    Canned artichokes

    Don’t feel like you need to eat a wide range of veggies from the get go, find one or two you like and eat them with everything. Then once you’re set with those try some new ones. Also, don’t feel like you have to eat a specific vegetable to be successful, all veggies are good veggies!
  • MelanieCN77
    MelanieCN77 Posts: 4,051 Member
    One veg can be worlds different to your palate depending on how it's cooked. Sautéd zucchini is a bit gross to me especially if it's over cooked even a little, but grilled/broiled I'll take it all day. A few veg are fine boiled but kinda amazing roasted - cauliflower comes to mind. Pick a veg you already can stomach and experiment one weekend cooking it a few different ways. Say carrots - straight boil with some salt, thin sliced and pan cooked with some oil, roasted on a tray - and see what you see. I think carrots are good all ways but they'll be different tastes and definitely textures. One of my favourite ways to do carrots is to boil cook with a parsnip or turnip and mash them together with S&P and some butter.
  • littlegreenparrot1
    littlegreenparrot1 Posts: 547 Member
    You could start by looking at what you make for dinner, and seeing if you can add more veg to that.
    Carrot chopped up small will vanish into a Bolognese sauce or a shepherd's pie for example.

    Experiment with salad veg. Cherry tomatoes are lovely and sweet. I will often make up a salsa salad and add it to everything - start with a ton of sweetcorn and drain. Chuck in a bowl, chop up some cucumber, tomato, red or yellow pepper to about the same size as the sweetcorn, all in the bowl together. The juice of a lemon or lime, couple of tablespoons of olive oil, chopped coriander, but if salt and pepper, and if you like some chilli flakes. Stir it all up and tuck in.

    Try sweet potato instead of white ones. Brussels sprouts might not be a favourite, but try boiling them first and let them cool, chop them up then fry with some chopped bacon, you might get more takers!

    Try things in different ways, I don't really like a raw carrot stick, but grated in a salad it's fine. I would never even consider eating a raw mushroom, but cook them all the time.

    It might be worth looking at what is in season in your region, it will probably be cheaper and easy to get, and will be at it's best.
    Then look for recipes and see what you fancy, maybe the children could get involved if they're old enough. You might get more buy in If they feel involved.

    Have fun!
  • tequila5000
    tequila5000 Posts: 128 Member
    Hi ! Does your family like crunchy snacks? If yes, then maybe some raw veggies like carrot, celery, bell peppers, cucumber, and maybe with some hummus for dipping. Or maybe a coleslaw with cabbage, carrot, and a yummy dressing. Does your family enjoy soup? Then maybe a minestrone soup. The above suggestions are all really good too. Let us know what you decide to try and how it turns out. Try different things, because I don’t think there is anybody out there who likes every vegetable cooked in every way. Each person has their preferences and the trick is to find out what each person prefers.
  • littlegreenparrot1
    littlegreenparrot1 Posts: 547 Member
    You could start by looking at what you make for dinner, and seeing if you can add more veg to that.
    Carrot chopped up small will vanish into a Bolognese sauce or a shepherd's pie for example.

    Experiment with salad veg. Cherry tomatoes are lovely and sweet. I will often make up a salsa salad and add it to everything - start with a ton of sweetcorn and drain. Chuck in a bowl, chop up some cucumber, tomato, red or yellow pepper to about the same size as the sweetcorn, all in the bowl together. The juice of a lemon or lime, couple of tablespoons of olive oil, chopped coriander, but if salt and pepper, and if you like some chilli flakes. Stir it all up and tuck in.

    Try sweet potato instead of white ones. Brussels sprouts might not be a favourite, but try boiling them first and let them cool, chop them up then fry with some chopped bacon, you might get more takers!

    Try things in different ways, I don't really like a raw carrot stick, but grated in a salad it's fine. I would never even consider eating a raw mushroom, but cook them all the time.

    It might be worth looking at what is in season in your region, it will probably be cheaper and easy to get, and will be at it's best.
    Then look for recipes and see what you fancy, maybe the children could get involved if they're old enough. You might get more buy in If they feel involved.

    Have fun!

    Just noticed typo - you could start your salsa salad with a ton of sweetcorn if you like, but I usually start with a tin 😉

    Blinkin autocorrect....
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,181 Member
    well, yes - a ton of sweet corn and then about the same size of the other ingredients would make a very large salad :o;)B):D
  • HeidiCooksSupper
    HeidiCooksSupper Posts: 3,836 Member
    I love the convenience of microwave steam-in-bag veggies. They are not the cheapest way to buy them but they are incredibly convenient. Lately, our local Big Y supermarket has had a house brand that is cheaper than the Birdseye and about as good! I find that if I nuke and pour out half the bag for supper, I can just clip the bag shut and throw it in the fridge for the next day. I don't recook in the bag, just throw the veg on the plate and warm up in the microwave.
  • RelCanonical
    RelCanonical Posts: 3,883 Member
    Just an update, I've bought some grated carrots, root vegetable mash (carrots, parsnip and swede) and steam bags (carrot, broccoli and corn). Yay 😍
    Thanks everyone ❤️

    Sounds delicious! I love the steam bags too, nice and convenient.
  • shirazumdraws
    shirazumdraws Posts: 63 Member
    I have recently turned vegan and am exploring all kinds of recipes. The easiest and yummiest vegetable I found is squash. You can fry them, make soup of them, make pie out of it, bake it in some sort of crisp form, it thickens the gravy and it helps with my sweet tooth.

    Eggplant is also delicious. So is fried plantain. My taste bud is like of kid's. I hope it helps.
  • hipari
    hipari Posts: 1,295 Member
    I always have some frozen pre-chopped onion and frozen chopped spinach in my freezer. It’s super easy to throw them in pretty much anything, they just disappear there and fill me up. I also love chopping cherry tomatoes to lots of things.
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,285 Member
    This recipe is something you could do with the grated carrots, that kids typically like.

    https://www.skinnytaste.com/zucchini-tots/
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,040 Member
    This ongoing thread here about Produce will change your life. :)

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10726786/for-the-love-of-produce/p1
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,181 Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    This recipe is something you could do with the grated carrots, that kids typically like.

    https://www.skinnytaste.com/zucchini-tots/


    They look like vegetable fritters which I make quite often, just in frypan on stove though, not baked. And I don't put cheese in mine, but you could.

    You can use any grated veg. I usually use zucchini and carrot, sometimes pumpkin.
  • acpgee
    acpgee Posts: 6,285 Member
    A couple of dishes I like that incorporate a lot of raw veg but are very tasty.

    Bagna cauda is a North Italian dish of raw veg dipped in a hot sauce of butter, olive oil, anchovy and garlic. You will need to like anchovy and garlic to enjoy this. The recipe below is given as a starter but a full peasant meal of bagna cauda would include crusty bread which serves to catch sauce drippings as you transport vegetable from the communal sauce pot to your plate. When the bread is soaked it is eaten too. The last stage of the dinner is scrambling eggs in the dregs of the sauce.
    https://www.saveur.com/article/recipes/marcella-hazans-bagna-cauda-anchovy-and-garlic-dip/

    Nam prik ong is a similar Thai dish where you dip raw veg into a warm, spicy, sloppy joe type sauce. The recipe below is easier than most because it starts with commercial Thai red curry paste. A lot of recipes specify making the curry paste from scratch which is a lot more work.
    https://importfood.com/recipes/recipe/201-spicy-pork-and-tomato-dip-with-veggies-nam-prik-ong

    Cambodian beef lok lak is a beef stir fry on a big bed of salad. Can be made with chicken or prawns. It is how Cambodian parents get children to eat salad.
    https://refugeekitchen.com/2014/04/04/khmer-lok-lak/

    Finally grande alioli is a dish from Provence in the spirit of raw veg dipped into homemade garlic mayonnaise. The aioli is so strongly flavoured no vegetable hater could protest. But the kids will need to like garlic for this to go down well with the family.
    https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/grand-aioli