Denied Weight-loss Surgery...

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Replies

  • gadorlogor
    gadorlogor Posts: 7 Member
    If you're losing weight track your macros as well as your micros. I see to many people eat sub 2,000 calories but around a hundred grams of fat and then wonder why they are gaining weight.
    Good luck.
  • gadorlogor
    gadorlogor Posts: 7 Member
    "some people cant just lose it the old fashion way."
    Everyone can, don't make excuses this is why you're fat.

  • Evamutt
    Evamutt Posts: 1,742 Member
    I agree that it is right for some people but please at least try to change your eating habits & lose weight that way first. I worked in ICU for 10 yrs & there was almost always someone in there from complications / infection. Most made it out but some also died. We do know a couple who had it many years ago & are still doing well but they were more than 100 lbs overweight. There are so many on here who have lost 100+ lbs. Do it slowly & change your food choices over a period of time
  • Diatonic12
    Diatonic12 Posts: 32,344 Member
    This is a judgment free zone and I'm in agreement with the comments above.

    WLS removes most of a stomach but does not fix the appetite control center which is located in the brain. WLS patients can eat it all back just like serial dieters do. Know this going in to surgery. My loved died due to complications from WLS. I have 6 relatives who've ate it all back with WLS. Not one of them is maintaining any of the original weight loss at the 5 year mark.

    Most of them started eating it all back at the 2 year mark.

    Speaking in general and to no one particular, can you answer this question: What was going through your mind as you were eating yourself into the highest weight you've ever been in your life?

    Pre, Mid or Post-surgery. With or without surgery.

    Why didn't your brain stop you one single time during the eating it all back phase and send out an alarm or even a word of caution. Why did your brain allow the eating phase to keep going and going and going without any kind of a stop-gap measure? Not stopping one single day to stop and look around. Not once.

    That's the brain and the appetite control center. These things won't change after surgery. There will be a major weight loss within the first year followed by more surgery to remove the loose skin. After all of that, the brain can kick it right back into those old eating patterns without new major cognitive behavior skillsets and subsets.

    A good surgeon will require counseling with a trial period to see if you can actually take off some of the weight before surgery. Many do and some decide to go on without the surgery.

    Removing most of a stomach doesn't fix what's really going on in the brain. It's the brain that needs fixing and the body will follow. T2 diabetes is often the underlying cause of a ravenous appetite that will not be abated. If you can get your blood glucose levels under control it makes all of this easier.

    People often overlook the underlying causes of what's really going on inside of their pancreas and other internal organs that are the largest contributor to obesity. We have to dig deep and get down to the root causes of what's really causing obesity.

    T2 and binge eating go hand in hand. Binge eating earlier in life can be the handwriting on the wall for your diabetes diagnosis coming later in life. It's all connected.


  • nanastaci2020
    nanastaci2020 Posts: 1,072 Member
    I hope you're doing well - I see this thread was started a month ago.

    WLS is a tool. But its not the only tool available for you on this journey.
  • nanastaci2020
    nanastaci2020 Posts: 1,072 Member
    100 grams of fat = 900 calories, and if their calorie target daily is 2000: that leaves 275 grams @ 4 calories each for proteins/carbs. Nothing wrong with this.

    If the people you 'see' are not losing weight on 2000 calories, then 2000 calories is either not a deficit for them OR they are eating more than they think.

    Eating fat does not make one gain weight. Consuming too many calories makes one gain weight.
    gadorlogor wrote: »
    If you're losing weight track your macros as well as your micros. I see to many people eat sub 2,000 calories but around a hundred grams of fat and then wonder why they are gaining weight.
    Good luck.

  • Evamutt
    Evamutt Posts: 1,742 Member
    as with any tool, it can help but can't work on it's own. I believe some ppl do need it. Anyone watch My 600 lb life? it says in the beginning that only 5% are successful. I think the % is fairly low for the rest of us who don't have to lose that much weight
  • Diatonic12
    Diatonic12 Posts: 32,344 Member
    edited July 2020
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6728934/

    Does binge-eating matter for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients?




    Conclusions
    The pool of evidence regarding the association between ED and T2DM seems to justify screening diabetic patients for abnormal eating behaviors. In addition, when obesity is present, eating psychopathology investigation is even more recommended, since it may disrupt obesity treatment and indirectly affect diabetes control.

    Although the objective negative clinical impact of an ED on type 2 diabetes control is yet to be confirmed, is possible to speculate that the remission of binge episodes could play a major role in diabetes treatment. The clinical control of eating psychopathology could enhance nutritional recommendations adherence and may diminished post-prandial glycemic peaks. Nevertheless, although the spectrum of the clinical significance of the comorbidity of ED and T2DM has not been extensively studies, treatment of binge-eating related disorders could improve perception of self-efficacy of patients toward the diabetes dietary carbohydrate goals and, ultimately improved diabetes-related quality of life.


    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32341661/


    Binge Eating Disorder in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Diagnostic and Management Challenges