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Over eating is an ecological issue- motivation?

CorvusCorax77CorvusCorax77 Member Posts: 2,516 Member Member Posts: 2,516 Member
I was wondering if anyone else thinks about the ecological impacts of over eating, and if anyone else is motivated by that? The idea first came to me when I heard we were fishing the ocean to death. While I am a vegetarian and I was vegan for 11 years, I don't believe that veganism or vegetarianism is a one size fits all solution (because I'm indigenous too and my ancestors didn't destroy their land base by hunting).

Anyways, so it turns out some folks have done some maths around the idea that over eating causes ecological destruction. It's not a perfect science, but they looked at how much of the population had how much of a BMI and the typical diet in that region, and calculated an approximately 240 billion tons of CO2 in the atmosphere caused by over eating alone.

Here's a link: https://www.treehugger.com/overeating-terrible-planet-4856664

Of course, I know some of us need to eat more (you weight lifting beefcakes!), so again not a "one size fits all" approach, but I thought this was a really interesting thing to look into.

I'm an earth loving hippie, so this motivates me to get my eating addiction under control.
edited August 24
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Replies

  • CorvusCorax77CorvusCorax77 Member Posts: 2,516 Member Member Posts: 2,516 Member
  • 4legsRbetterthan24legsRbetterthan2 Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 18,294 MFP Moderator Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium Posts: 18,294 MFP Moderator
    Neat topic idea @CorvusCorax77

    I hope you don't mind I moved this over to the debate section, I think it will get some better visability here.
  • CorvusCorax77CorvusCorax77 Member Posts: 2,516 Member Member Posts: 2,516 Member
    If this idea motivates you then more power to you! :) I’ve thought about having lessened my ecological impact due to the fact that I am a barefoot runner. I run barefoot because to me it feels natural and fun but I realize I’m also saving the planet a teeny tiny bit from having to manufacture, transport and later dispose of multiple pairs of running shoes every single year for many years and that’s definitely an added bonus in my opinion :)

    That's pretty rad. What type of surface do you run on?
  • RunsWithBeesRunsWithBees Member Posts: 1,299 Member Member Posts: 1,299 Member
    If this idea motivates you then more power to you! :) I’ve thought about having lessened my ecological impact due to the fact that I am a barefoot runner. I run barefoot because to me it feels natural and fun but I realize I’m also saving the planet a teeny tiny bit from having to manufacture, transport and later dispose of multiple pairs of running shoes every single year for many years and that’s definitely an added bonus in my opinion :)

    That's pretty rad. What type of surface do you run on?

    Trail and pavement. Trail running is my true passion! Been at it for 6+ years
  • Mellouk89Mellouk89 Member Posts: 122 Member Member Posts: 122 Member
    Food waste is a big problem, I try my hardest not to throw away food.

    I rarely do it, maybe once a month at most.
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,165 Member Member Posts: 1,165 Member
    No one forces you to eat. It's about personal responsibility.
  • zamphir66zamphir66 Member Posts: 549 Member Member Posts: 549 Member
    Deleted.
    edited August 27
  • fstricklfstrickl Member Posts: 706 Member Member Posts: 706 Member
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    Food waste is a big problem, I try my hardest not to throw away food.

    I rarely do it, maybe once a month at most.

    Somehow I missed this. That’s so impressive! What are some steps you take to reduce food waste?
  • OnedaywriterOnedaywriter Member Posts: 204 Member Member Posts: 204 Member
    Good points all!!

    Another important point- packaging!!
    Think about this- the amount of packaging needed for tap or home filtered water, fresh fruits, veggies, meat, fish etc is minimal but the amount of packaging required for bottled water, Soda pop, chips (crisps), frozen dinners etc has a huge environmental impact. It is made from fossil fuels, mined metals and trees and requires much by way of transportation and refrigeration.
    When I’m “eating clean” the trash bin looks empty compared to when it used to be stuffed with frozen food packages, candy wrappers etc.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,358 Member Member Posts: 8,358 Member
    fstrickl wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    Food waste is a big problem, I try my hardest not to throw away food.

    I rarely do it, maybe once a month at most.

    Somehow I missed this. That’s so impressive! What are some steps you take to reduce food waste?

    I'm not the person you were responding to, and I would admit that I probably toss things two or even three times a month (almost always fresh produce that started growing mold or went slimy before I could finish it), but here are the things I find most important in reducing food waste:

    (1) Eat, repurpose, or freeze leftovers (I probably toss leftovers once a year, if that -- to me, it's convenience food -- ready to eat).

    (2) Don't overbuy perishable foods. This is the hardest one for me, because I'm almost always cooking for one, and I like cooking from scratch, and whole foods are often only available in multi-serve amounts. Back when groceries stores had salad bars, I would sometimes buy small amounts for a specific recipe from the salad bar, but mostly I just try to limit what I buy and make a point of eating it before it goes bad.

    (3) Triage perishable foods. E.g., if I buy different types of fruit, berries and stone fruit are going to get eaten before apples and citrus. For veggies, leafy greens, asparagus, and other quick to spoil veggies get eaten first, with things like okra, eggplant, broccoli, etc., getting eaten next. Root vegetables (potatoes, carrots, turnips), green cabbage, and winter squash last a really long time, and thus go to the end of the triage list. Same with dairy: I find cultured products (yogurt, buttermilk, kefir) have a long shelf-life, as do a lot of hard cheeses, so I focus more on finishing regular milk and soft cheeses. I store shredded cheeses in the freezer; it doesn't seem to compromise texture or flavor at all.

    Figuring out which of the foods you eat can be frozen without loss of quality is a big help. In general, things with low liquid content are generally good candidates, with the bonus that they thaw quickly when removed from the freezer (e.g., bread).
  • MarttaHPMarttaHP Member Posts: 36 Member Member Posts: 36 Member
    fstrickl wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    Food waste is a big problem, I try my hardest not to throw away food.

    I rarely do it, maybe once a month at most.

    Somehow I missed this. That’s so impressive! What are some steps you take to reduce food waste?

    Is it impressive? Honestly, I'm baffled by the fact that households generate so much food waste. 43% in the US according to this report, which is probably similar to most developed countries. I've never understood how, why. Can anyone offer any insight into this? What kinds of foods do you throw out, and why?

    Me, I buy only what I intend to eat, I eat everything I buy. Very occasionally I might throw out a piece of fruit that I didn't notice at the store had started going moldy and brought home. I suppose that maybe with children things might be more complicated - my 10-month old nephew throws much of his food on the floor, and not even his aunt who finds food waste abhorrent will pick it up and eat it herself. But then again he's small, so it's not as if he eats (or wastes) much to begin with. Shouldn't adults be able to plan what they are going to eat and act accordingly?
  • AvidkeoAvidkeo Member Posts: 2,300 Member Member Posts: 2,300 Member
    MarttaHP wrote: »
    fstrickl wrote: »
    Mellouk89 wrote: »
    Food waste is a big problem, I try my hardest not to throw away food.

    I rarely do it, maybe once a month at most.

    Somehow I missed this. That’s so impressive! What are some steps you take to reduce food waste?

    Is it impressive? Honestly, I'm baffled by the fact that households generate so much food waste. 43% in the US according to this report, which is probably similar to most developed countries. I've never understood how, why. Can anyone offer any insight into this? What kinds of foods do you throw out, and why?

    Me, I buy only what I intend to eat, I eat everything I buy. Very occasionally I might throw out a piece of fruit that I didn't notice at the store had started going moldy and brought home. I suppose that maybe with children things might be more complicated - my 10-month old nephew throws much of his food on the floor, and not even his aunt who finds food waste abhorrent will pick it up and eat it herself. But then again he's small, so it's not as if he eats (or wastes) much to begin with. Shouldn't adults be able to plan what they are going to eat and act accordingly?

    Kids. Omg kids create so much waste.

    We buy a lot of fruit because my kids eat a lot of fruit. That and bread is always available to them. And usually they are pretty good at eating it. Buy boy do they go through patches where they won't touch it and it rots in the bowl. Or they get a banana and because of a brown spot they won't eat it, or they get something because they are starving, eat half and throw away the rest.

    We are trying to teach them to not waste food, but it's an ongoing challenge. They are getting better, but they are also only 4 and 6.

    Also, the pickiness! We refuse to cook seperate meals. So they eat what ever we make for them. No individual meals. So this can cause waste, by them simply not eating what they are given.

    So yeah, kids.

    After that it's more complicated. I know I've bought stuff, intending to use it throughout the week, then simply didn't want to eat it when I got to it, or even forgot about it. Is this privileged? Absolutely. Did I do the same thing when I had absolutely no money, you bet it did. I believe its because we are trained and conditioned by advertising and marketing to always believe we have a choice no matter what.
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