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Seeking recommendations for home gym equiptment

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Also stay away from total gym (more junk)

    I would not say universally Total Gym is junk. My physical therapist's office which is affiliated with a well respected orthopedic surgeons group has one. Now there are various models available some better than others.

    While some or better than others, when compared with say a cybex bravo ft or even an inspire FT1, either of those functional trainers is clearly the far superior machine just in materials alone. Ergonomically they are also superior.

    I have worked with many different physical therapy studios over the years and have never seen one with a total gym of any kind. They don’t always have high end equipment, but I’ve never known one who would get something like that to use with clients. While I get that some of the line is obviously better than others, for the same or slightly more money, there are many different, better, options out there.

    If someone is happy with theirs, great. The OP wanted an all in one machine and had previous experience with gym quality machines based on her post. A total gym, is NOT and never will be a gym quality machine, so I was suggesting she get something more like what the gym has to offer.

    As it turns out, this particular OP probably should work with a personal trainer before making the leap into buying any equipment as they want a machine to dictate their form. She should work on form and then potentially spend the money on an ever better setup that includes free weights.

    The orthopedic surgeon that owns this practice has his undergrad from MIT, med school at University of Rochester, specialist training at Ohio State, 25 year of practice and does shoulder work for several universities including a Big 10 school and another D1 school. With all due respect, this doctor with more expertise in the field than I would venture to say anyone on these boards, believes that piece of equipment has a place in his facility.

    Now I will say, when I have seen therapists using it, it has been with deconditioned individuals or someone just starting rehab. They put me on it early stages of shoulder rehab and it worked fine, though I soon grew out of it.

    The OP says he budget is $4k and has not worked out using home exercise equipment. Personally I wouldn't be counseling someone in that situation to spend that kind of money out the gate, especially when she says if financing is available. Get something more affordable see if you really use and can upgrade when time.

    I do agree the OP should be looking toward working on form and a more free weight based approach.
    edited October 2020
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,837 Member Member Posts: 2,837 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Also stay away from total gym (more junk)

    I would not say universally Total Gym is junk. My physical therapist's office which is affiliated with a well respected orthopedic surgeons group has one. Now there are various models available some better than others.

    While some or better than others, when compared with say a cybex bravo ft or even an inspire FT1, either of those functional trainers is clearly the far superior machine just in materials alone. Ergonomically they are also superior.

    I have worked with many different physical therapy studios over the years and have never seen one with a total gym of any kind. They don’t always have high end equipment, but I’ve never known one who would get something like that to use with clients. While I get that some of the line is obviously better than others, for the same or slightly more money, there are many different, better, options out there.

    If someone is happy with theirs, great. The OP wanted an all in one machine and had previous experience with gym quality machines based on her post. A total gym, is NOT and never will be a gym quality machine, so I was suggesting she get something more like what the gym has to offer.

    As it turns out, this particular OP probably should work with a personal trainer before making the leap into buying any equipment as they want a machine to dictate their form. She should work on form and then potentially spend the money on an ever better setup that includes free weights.

    The orthopedic surgeon that owns this practice has his undergrad from MIT, med school at University of Rochester, specialist training at Ohio State, 25 year of practice and does shoulder work for several universities including a Big 10 school and another D1 school. With all due respect, this doctor with more expertise in the field than I would venture to say anyone on these boards, believes that piece of equipment has a place in his facility.

    Now I will say, when I have seen therapists using it, it has been with deconditioned individuals or someone just starting rehab. They put me on it early stages of shoulder rehab and it worked fine, though I soon grew out of it.

    The OP says he budget is $4k and has not worked out using home exercise equipment. Personally I wouldn't be counseling someone in that situation to spend that kind of money out the gate, especially when she says if financing is available. Get something more affordable see if you really use and can upgrade when time.

    I do agree the OP should be looking toward working on form and a more free weight based approach.

    Another "gimmick" used a lot in Physical Therapy are BodyBlades. Fantastic for shoulder work. Most people think of BodyBlades as giant Shakeweights, but it turns out they are fantastic to get the small muscles in shoulders activated.
    edited October 2020
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Also stay away from total gym (more junk)

    I would not say universally Total Gym is junk. My physical therapist's office which is affiliated with a well respected orthopedic surgeons group has one. Now there are various models available some better than others.

    While some or better than others, when compared with say a cybex bravo ft or even an inspire FT1, either of those functional trainers is clearly the far superior machine just in materials alone. Ergonomically they are also superior.

    I have worked with many different physical therapy studios over the years and have never seen one with a total gym of any kind. They don’t always have high end equipment, but I’ve never known one who would get something like that to use with clients. While I get that some of the line is obviously better than others, for the same or slightly more money, there are many different, better, options out there.

    If someone is happy with theirs, great. The OP wanted an all in one machine and had previous experience with gym quality machines based on her post. A total gym, is NOT and never will be a gym quality machine, so I was suggesting she get something more like what the gym has to offer.

    As it turns out, this particular OP probably should work with a personal trainer before making the leap into buying any equipment as they want a machine to dictate their form. She should work on form and then potentially spend the money on an ever better setup that includes free weights.

    The orthopedic surgeon that owns this practice has his undergrad from MIT, med school at University of Rochester, specialist training at Ohio State, 25 year of practice and does shoulder work for several universities including a Big 10 school and another D1 school. With all due respect, this doctor with more expertise in the field than I would venture to say anyone on these boards, believes that piece of equipment has a place in his facility.

    Now I will say, when I have seen therapists using it, it has been with deconditioned individuals or someone just starting rehab. They put me on it early stages of shoulder rehab and it worked fine, though I soon grew out of it.

    The OP says he budget is $4k and has not worked out using home exercise equipment. Personally I wouldn't be counseling someone in that situation to spend that kind of money out the gate, especially when she says if financing is available. Get something more affordable see if you really use and can upgrade when time.

    I do agree the OP should be looking toward working on form and a more free weight based approach.

    Another "gimmick" used a lot in Physical Therapy are BodyBlades. Fantastic for shoulder work. Most people think of BodyBlades as giant Shakeweights, but it turns out they are fantastic to get the small muscles in shoulders activated.

    I have shoulder issues been thinking about the BodyBlade.

    Given the background of the doctor that owns the facility and the managing therapist (DPT, D1 15 years experience and former D1 catcher) I have all thr faith in the world they are equipping the facility properly for the intended use.
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,189 Member Member Posts: 1,189 Member
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,189 Member Member Posts: 1,189 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accesory work.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,837 Member Member Posts: 2,837 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accesory work.

    That's why I thought that Tempo Fit looked amazing for women in this type of situation.

    Aside from the electronics breaking down and it being a new product (yes, both of which are risky), it accomplishes everything the OP was looking for.

    Don't like that they sneak the $39 monthly classes in and kind of hide that from the price of the product ($55 a month).

    https://tempo.fit/

    May not be worth trying a new product that has such a likely expensive screen to fix, but this is old school meets new tech, which I appreciate.

    edited October 2020
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accessory work.

    Agree, the movements you mention, squat, press and deadlift (hip hinge) are basic human movements that most people should be training.

    With a machine like this I could see these as ways to get the basic movements in. Now there is going to be some loading issues for a stronger individual but for most you could probably make this work pretty well.

    Cable Pull-through = hip hinge/deadlift
    s4lfejjum6my.png


    This version of squat:
    4spo81kk828h.png

    Overhead Press:

    8kiu2crlgn2v.png
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,189 Member Member Posts: 1,189 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accessory work.

    Agree, the movements you mention, squat, press and deadlift (hip hinge) are basic human movements that most people should be training.

    With a machine like this I could see these as ways to get the basic movements in. Now there is going to be some loading issues for a stronger individual but for most you could probably make this work pretty well.

    Cable Pull-through = hip hinge/deadlift
    s4lfejjum6my.png


    This version of squat:
    4spo81kk828h.png

    Overhead Press:

    8kiu2crlgn2v.png

    I guess it depends on their physical capabilities. Possibly outgrowing the usable weight.
  • cgvet37cgvet37 Member Posts: 1,189 Member Member Posts: 1,189 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accesory work.

    That's why I thought that Tempo Fit looked amazing for women in this type of situation.

    Aside from the electronics breaking down and it being a new product (yes, both of which are risky), it accomplishes everything the OP was looking for.

    Don't like that they sneak the $39 monthly classes in and kind of hide that from the price of the product ($55 a month).

    https://tempo.fit/

    May not be worth trying a new product that has such a likely expensive screen to fix, but this is old school meets new tech, which I appreciate.

    They also make one with built-in resistance. Without using one it's hard to give my opinion.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accessory work.

    Agree, the movements you mention, squat, press and deadlift (hip hinge) are basic human movements that most people should be training.

    With a machine like this I could see these as ways to get the basic movements in. Now there is going to be some loading issues for a stronger individual but for most you could probably make this work pretty well.

    Cable Pull-through = hip hinge/deadlift
    s4lfejjum6my.png


    This version of squat:
    4spo81kk828h.png

    Overhead Press:

    8kiu2crlgn2v.png

    I guess it depends on their physical capabilities. Possibly outgrowing the usable weight.

    Totally agree fie a stronger individual.
  • MikePfirrmanMikePfirrman Member Posts: 2,837 Member Member Posts: 2,837 Member
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    cgvet37 wrote: »
    My opinion, hire a personal trainer and learn first. My opinion, all in one machines are very limiting. Free weights not only help you build strength, but stability. Unless you have serious underlying injuries or other medical conditions.

    I would tend to agree. Now some to the ''free motion type" machines mentioned like this

    ovfu9t1hw6lo.png

    would help build stability. Personally my thought is one will build better stability and core strength the more the exercise in a way their body is not supported by a machine/bench/chair (of course this is going to within the individuals physical limits).

    Those are nice. I guess I see exercises like barbell squats, OHP, and deadlifts as essential. They are natural movements we do every day. Cable machines have their place. I like them for doing accesory work.

    That's why I thought that Tempo Fit looked amazing for women in this type of situation.

    Aside from the electronics breaking down and it being a new product (yes, both of which are risky), it accomplishes everything the OP was looking for.

    Don't like that they sneak the $39 monthly classes in and kind of hide that from the price of the product ($55 a month).

    https://tempo.fit/

    May not be worth trying a new product that has such a likely expensive screen to fix, but this is old school meets new tech, which I appreciate.

    They also make one with built-in resistance. Without using one it's hard to give my opinion.

    My concern, a huge one, is what happens when the screen breaks. Have to say, though, great concept.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 25,153 Member Member Posts: 25,153 Member
    gannonmail wrote: »
    Ok, so I looked at the links, but I have to say that box thing scares me. I need machines that keep you in alignment. I don't like free weights for that exact reason. The pulley systems are so loosely goosey I KNOW I will injure myself. Thank you so much for the feedback on the other systems though because they didn't look like junk at all to me and I was about to purchase one. I guess I will have to keep searching.

    Another vote for a personal trainer, preferably one who specializes in bone density issues. My mom started strength training with a PT in her late 70's due to osteoporosis. Good for you for starting to address bone density now :)

    I've seen plenty of bad form from people using machines in gyms.
    edited October 2020
  • HeidiCooksSupperHeidiCooksSupper Member, Premium Posts: 3,836 Member Member, Premium Posts: 3,836 Member
    I had a big home gym (cable & weight machine) with many possible ways to use it. I had to get rid of it when we moved. One very important thing I learned is that there are MANY of them on the used market looking for homes. I finally had to give my $2500+ machine away to a community center. This is one instance where I would haunt Craig's List or other local sources to find a good, little-used machine for about 1/10th retail.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    I had a big home gym (cable & weight machine) with many possible ways to use it. I had to get rid of it when we moved. One very important thing I learned is that there are MANY of them on the used market looking for homes. I finally had to give my $2500+ machine away to a community center. This is one instance where I would haunt Craig's List or other local sources to find a good, little-used machine for about 1/10th retail.

    Worth trying but with Covid if you find fitness equipment used at a decent price you better hustle to the seller and have cash in hand inany areas.
  • Dogmom1978Dogmom1978 Member Posts: 1,587 Member Member Posts: 1,587 Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I had a big home gym (cable & weight machine) with many possible ways to use it. I had to get rid of it when we moved. One very important thing I learned is that there are MANY of them on the used market looking for homes. I finally had to give my $2500+ machine away to a community center. This is one instance where I would haunt Craig's List or other local sources to find a good, little-used machine for about 1/10th retail.

    Worth trying but with Covid if you find fitness equipment used at a decent price you better hustle to the seller and have cash in hand inany areas.

    @Theoldguy1 Considering the OP has a $4k budget, she shouldn’t have a problem finding a used one she can afford.
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Member Posts: 2,128 Member Member Posts: 2,128 Member
    Dogmom1978 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    I had a big home gym (cable & weight machine) with many possible ways to use it. I had to get rid of it when we moved. One very important thing I learned is that there are MANY of them on the used market looking for homes. I finally had to give my $2500+ machine away to a community center. This is one instance where I would haunt Craig's List or other local sources to find a good, little-used machine for about 1/10th retail.

    Worth trying but with Covid if you find fitness equipment used at a decent price you better hustle to the seller and have cash in hand inany areas.

    @Theoldguy1 Considering the OP has a $4k budget, she shouldn’t have a problem finding a used one she can afford.

    My response was to a comment from someone other than the OP.
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