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How do I stay full?

Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
I’m trying to lose some weight and I’ve worked out I need to cut 500 calories each day. Does anyone know any good foods I can eat to stay full longer?
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  • Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    1/2 kg each week over 20 weeks. I think your strat is wise. It’s prob better to ease into it so my body gets used to less food slowly.
  • Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    Lol! Never expected two cat lovers to give me advice 😂 much appreciated - thank you.
  • L1zardQueenL1zardQueen Member Posts: 8,750 Member Member Posts: 8,750 Member
    Cats are wise. Yes.
  • goal06082021goal06082021 Member Posts: 1,315 Member Member Posts: 1,315 Member
    Drink more water. Sometimes it's hard to distinguish between hunger and thirst, so if it's not quite time for the next full meal and you're thinking you should grab a snack, have a glass of water first and then see how you feel.
  • Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    Drink more water. Sometimes it's hard to distinguish between hunger and thirst, so if it's not quite time for the next full meal and you're thinking you should grab a snack, have a glass of water first and then see how you feel.

    Got it thanks for the advice.
  • Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Without intending to counter the excellent advice above: Some of satiation is individual and idiosyncratic. Pay attention to how you feel, and think about how it relates to what you eat.

    Some people feel more satiated with relatively more protein, some with more fats, some with lots of fiber-rich foods, other via high-volume eating (of low-calorie-density things - there's a huge thread about this over in the Food & Nutrition part of the Community). Timing can matter, too. People do everything from one big meal a day (OMAD) to all-day grazing, and everything in between. Some people find skipping breakfast easy and painless, while other are ready to eat the furniture before lunchtime if they try. There can also be specific food choices that are filling, but that's individual, too. Research on satiating foods puts plain cooked white potatoes at the top of the list of filling foods. For other people, it might be oatmeal, or who knows what.

    Personally, I need a good bit of protein at breakfast (and I *do* need breakfast!), and protein through the day. At some point daily, I need some volume foods (usually it's veggies, and plenty of 'em). Oatmeal is filling, and if I get hungry when a meal isn't coming up soon, I'm better off eating a small protein-rich snack, so that I don't risk over-eating at the next meal. You will be different from that, I'm just using myself as an applied example of the kinds of things that might matter.

    So, definitely try the strategies others have mentioned, but be attentive to the results, and experiment along the way.

    Thanks for the advice bro. Food is my weakness. I hope I’ll be more discipline this time and I’ll experiment with eating different foods as you’ve pointed out to get a better understanding of hunger levels in my body. I like potatoes, so I’ll do some reading on that. I usually eat what I want to eat, so I don’t have anyone to blame, or I skip meals because of work and end up binging on anything I can find that is quick, usually crap. I appreciate your reply.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member
    Chadwick_J wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Without intending to counter the excellent advice above: Some of satiation is individual and idiosyncratic. Pay attention to how you feel, and think about how it relates to what you eat.

    Some people feel more satiated with relatively more protein, some with more fats, some with lots of fiber-rich foods, other via high-volume eating (of low-calorie-density things - there's a huge thread about this over in the Food & Nutrition part of the Community). Timing can matter, too. People do everything from one big meal a day (OMAD) to all-day grazing, and everything in between. Some people find skipping breakfast easy and painless, while other are ready to eat the furniture before lunchtime if they try. There can also be specific food choices that are filling, but that's individual, too. Research on satiating foods puts plain cooked white potatoes at the top of the list of filling foods. For other people, it might be oatmeal, or who knows what.

    Personally, I need a good bit of protein at breakfast (and I *do* need breakfast!), and protein through the day. At some point daily, I need some volume foods (usually it's veggies, and plenty of 'em). Oatmeal is filling, and if I get hungry when a meal isn't coming up soon, I'm better off eating a small protein-rich snack, so that I don't risk over-eating at the next meal. You will be different from that, I'm just using myself as an applied example of the kinds of things that might matter.

    So, definitely try the strategies others have mentioned, but be attentive to the results, and experiment along the way.

    Thanks for the advice bro. Food is my weakness. I hope I’ll be more discipline this time and I’ll experiment with eating different foods as you’ve pointed out to get a better understanding of hunger levels in my body. I like potatoes, so I’ll do some reading on that. I usually eat what I want to eat, so I don’t have anyone to blame, or I skip meals because of work and end up binging on anything I can find that is quick, usually crap. I appreciate your reply.

    Bro? Just for the record, I'm a li'l ol' lady, age 65. 😆 (Yes, that's me in my profile photo, though around age 60.) But you can call me "bro" if you like, I guess.

    Consider this:

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b3cf/3b7d71a7485e6355e49b2e4c86db54b25046.pdf

    When I was losing, I kept shelf-stable protein snacks in my car, in case hunger hit while I was out and about. Had I not already been retired then, I would've kept some in my desk at work, too. (Consider options that are nutritious, pleasant enough to eat, but not profoundly tempting. Dry-roasted soybeans are one that worked for me, for example.)
    edited January 16
  • quiksylver296quiksylver296 Member, Premium Posts: 28,074 Member Member, Premium Posts: 28,074 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Chadwick_J wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Without intending to counter the excellent advice above: Some of satiation is individual and idiosyncratic. Pay attention to how you feel, and think about how it relates to what you eat.

    Some people feel more satiated with relatively more protein, some with more fats, some with lots of fiber-rich foods, other via high-volume eating (of low-calorie-density things - there's a huge thread about this over in the Food & Nutrition part of the Community). Timing can matter, too. People do everything from one big meal a day (OMAD) to all-day grazing, and everything in between. Some people find skipping breakfast easy and painless, while other are ready to eat the furniture before lunchtime if they try. There can also be specific food choices that are filling, but that's individual, too. Research on satiating foods puts plain cooked white potatoes at the top of the list of filling foods. For other people, it might be oatmeal, or who knows what.

    Personally, I need a good bit of protein at breakfast (and I *do* need breakfast!), and protein through the day. At some point daily, I need some volume foods (usually it's veggies, and plenty of 'em). Oatmeal is filling, and if I get hungry when a meal isn't coming up soon, I'm better off eating a small protein-rich snack, so that I don't risk over-eating at the next meal. You will be different from that, I'm just using myself as an applied example of the kinds of things that might matter.

    So, definitely try the strategies others have mentioned, but be attentive to the results, and experiment along the way.

    Thanks for the advice bro. Food is my weakness. I hope I’ll be more discipline this time and I’ll experiment with eating different foods as you’ve pointed out to get a better understanding of hunger levels in my body. I like potatoes, so I’ll do some reading on that. I usually eat what I want to eat, so I don’t have anyone to blame, or I skip meals because of work and end up binging on anything I can find that is quick, usually crap. I appreciate your reply.

    Bro? Just for the record, I'm a li'l ol' lady, age 65. 😆 (Yes, that's me in my profile photo, though around age 60.) But you can call me "bro" if you like, I guess.

    Consider this:

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b3cf/3b7d71a7485e6355e49b2e4c86db54b25046.pdf

    When I was losing, I kept shelf-stable protein snacks in my car, in case hunger hit while I was out and about. Had I not already been retired then, I would've kept some in my desk at work, too. (Consider options that are nutritious, pleasant enough to eat, but not profoundly tempting. Dry-roasted soybeans are one that worked for me, for example.)

    Bro! :laugh:
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Chadwick_J wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Without intending to counter the excellent advice above: Some of satiation is individual and idiosyncratic. Pay attention to how you feel, and think about how it relates to what you eat.

    Some people feel more satiated with relatively more protein, some with more fats, some with lots of fiber-rich foods, other via high-volume eating (of low-calorie-density things - there's a huge thread about this over in the Food & Nutrition part of the Community). Timing can matter, too. People do everything from one big meal a day (OMAD) to all-day grazing, and everything in between. Some people find skipping breakfast easy and painless, while other are ready to eat the furniture before lunchtime if they try. There can also be specific food choices that are filling, but that's individual, too. Research on satiating foods puts plain cooked white potatoes at the top of the list of filling foods. For other people, it might be oatmeal, or who knows what.

    Personally, I need a good bit of protein at breakfast (and I *do* need breakfast!), and protein through the day. At some point daily, I need some volume foods (usually it's veggies, and plenty of 'em). Oatmeal is filling, and if I get hungry when a meal isn't coming up soon, I'm better off eating a small protein-rich snack, so that I don't risk over-eating at the next meal. You will be different from that, I'm just using myself as an applied example of the kinds of things that might matter.

    So, definitely try the strategies others have mentioned, but be attentive to the results, and experiment along the way.

    Thanks for the advice bro. Food is my weakness. I hope I’ll be more discipline this time and I’ll experiment with eating different foods as you’ve pointed out to get a better understanding of hunger levels in my body. I like potatoes, so I’ll do some reading on that. I usually eat what I want to eat, so I don’t have anyone to blame, or I skip meals because of work and end up binging on anything I can find that is quick, usually crap. I appreciate your reply.

    Bro? Just for the record, I'm a li'l ol' lady, age 65. 😆 (Yes, that's me in my profile photo, though around age 60.) But you can call me "bro" if you like, I guess.

    Consider this:

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b3cf/3b7d71a7485e6355e49b2e4c86db54b25046.pdf

    When I was losing, I kept shelf-stable protein snacks in my car, in case hunger hit while I was out and about. Had I not already been retired then, I would've kept some in my desk at work, too. (Consider options that are nutritious, pleasant enough to eat, but not profoundly tempting. Dry-roasted soybeans are one that worked for me, for example.)

    Bro! :laugh:

    ToldJa.
  • Chadwick_JChadwick_J Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Chadwick_J wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Without intending to counter the excellent advice above: Some of satiation is individual and idiosyncratic. Pay attention to how you feel, and think about how it relates to what you eat.

    Some people feel more satiated with relatively more protein, some with more fats, some with lots of fiber-rich foods, other via high-volume eating (of low-calorie-density things - there's a huge thread about this over in the Food & Nutrition part of the Community). Timing can matter, too. People do everything from one big meal a day (OMAD) to all-day grazing, and everything in between. Some people find skipping breakfast easy and painless, while other are ready to eat the furniture before lunchtime if they try. There can also be specific food choices that are filling, but that's individual, too. Research on satiating foods puts plain cooked white potatoes at the top of the list of filling foods. For other people, it might be oatmeal, or who knows what.

    Personally, I need a good bit of protein at breakfast (and I *do* need breakfast!), and protein through the day. At some point daily, I need some volume foods (usually it's veggies, and plenty of 'em). Oatmeal is filling, and if I get hungry when a meal isn't coming up soon, I'm better off eating a small protein-rich snack, so that I don't risk over-eating at the next meal. You will be different from that, I'm just using myself as an applied example of the kinds of things that might matter.

    So, definitely try the strategies others have mentioned, but be attentive to the results, and experiment along the way.

    Thanks for the advice bro. Food is my weakness. I hope I’ll be more discipline this time and I’ll experiment with eating different foods as you’ve pointed out to get a better understanding of hunger levels in my body. I like potatoes, so I’ll do some reading on that. I usually eat what I want to eat, so I don’t have anyone to blame, or I skip meals because of work and end up binging on anything I can find that is quick, usually crap. I appreciate your reply.

    Bro? Just for the record, I'm a li'l ol' lady, age 65. 😆 (Yes, that's me in my profile photo, though around age 60.) But you can call me "bro" if you like, I guess.

    Consider this:

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b3cf/3b7d71a7485e6355e49b2e4c86db54b25046.pdf

    When I was losing, I kept shelf-stable protein snacks in my car, in case hunger hit while I was out and about. Had I not already been retired then, I would've kept some in my desk at work, too. (Consider options that are nutritious, pleasant enough to eat, but not profoundly tempting. Dry-roasted soybeans are one that worked for me, for example.)

    Hahaha, best laugh of the day. So sorry, no disrespect.

    I’ve just had a turkey salad sandwich, but still hungry. I think I’ll pop into the grocery store to get some fruit and lean meats for the coming week.
  • yirarayirara Member Posts: 6,680 Member Member Posts: 6,680 Member
    Sorry, not a cat. I just chimed in because there's lots of laughter here, and to say that all above is right.
    Find food that makes you feel full and happy. Feeling full is important when losing weight of course. But feeling happy is as well so that you make it to the finish line. There's no need to punish yourself. All foods are allowed (provided no medical conditions).
  • ac7ssmac7ssm Member Posts: 14 Member Member Posts: 14 Member
    In my experience, "Fullness" is dependent on what you have eaten. Sugar triggers hunger for me, If I avoid sugar, I can feel fuller longer.
    YMMV
  • shadowfax_c11shadowfax_c11 Member Posts: 1,942 Member Member Posts: 1,942 Member
    Big glass of water with some Metamucil (psyllium powder) will make you feel full. But please be sure your calorie goal is realistic and healthy.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member Member, Premium Posts: 20,820 Member
    BTW, thinking it may not have been clear, because of laugh-y context. This link that I suggested above (with the totally nonspecific URL) . . . .

    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/b3cf/3b7d71a7485e6355e49b2e4c86db54b25046.pdf

    . . . is a list of foods from a research study, indicating the "satiation index" (fullness-invoking value) of a number of specific common foods, as rated by the research subjects. The findings won't be universal, but could suggest some useful things to experiment with.

    Also, there's been some research suggesting that some compound in leafy dark greens helps with satiation. I can't put my fingers on the link right now, but heck, a nice big mixed-greens salad, or a goodly portion of lightly-sauteed greens with flavorful vinaigrette or miso or something . . . that's enjoyable/useful for other reasons, too, so why not eat some? 🙂
  • sportygal1971sportygal1971 Member, Premium Posts: 55 Member Member, Premium Posts: 55 Member
    Healthy fat & protein fill me up. I eat under 125 to 150g carbs a day because they just want me to eat more most days I'm under 100.
    Fat is not the bad guy and I don't feel I've been sacrificing much w my nutrition eating eggs, avocado, olive oil etc to satisfy me.
    Celery, asparagus, cauliflower are my go to carbs since they are low on glycemic index.
  • rosebarnalicerosebarnalice Member Posts: 3,293 Member Member Posts: 3,293 Member
    I'm big on veggie-based soups and filling up on lots of veggies at every meal (I average about 40-50 grams of fiber a day- mostly from veggies)
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